Winding up motorists.

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Chris French, Jul 9, 2003.

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  1. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    It's summer (and it sunny....), lots of people have their car windows open, a number of them like to
    sit with the mobile clamped to the ear.

    They do like it when you cheerfully remind them that it will soon be illegal as you pass by :)
    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
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  2. Ben

    Ben Guest

    chris French wrote:
    > It's summer (and it sunny....), lots of people have their car windows open, a number of them like
    > to sit with the mobile clamped to the ear.
    >
    > They do like it when you cheerfully remind them that it will soon be illegal as you pass by :)

    What's the point? It's not illegal now, when it is, they'll get done for it. End of story. Why
    go out of your way to antagonise someone and potentially ruin your day when one of them gets
    arsey with you?
    --
    ******** replace 'spam' with 'ben' to reply *********
     
  3. Frank X

    Frank X Guest

    "chris French" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > It's summer (and it sunny....), lots of people have their car windows open, a number of them like
    > to sit with the mobile clamped to the ear.
    >
    > They do like it when you cheerfully remind them that it will soon be illegal as you pass by :)
    > --
    Are you sure it's illegal?
     
  4. chris French wrote:
    > It's summer (and it sunny....), lots of people have their car windows open, a number of them like
    > to sit with the mobile clamped to the ear.
    >
    > They do like it when you cheerfully remind them that it will soon be illegal as you pass by :)

    They like it even more if you gob in their windows as you pass, just say SMIDSY if they complain.
     
  5. chris French <[email protected]> wrote: ( They do like it when you cheerfully remind them
    that it will soon be ) illegal as you pass by :)

    Wouldn't it be illegal if you weren't passing by?
     
  6. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Guest

    chris French wrote:

    >It's summer (and it sunny....), lots of people have their car windows open, a number of them like
    >to sit with the mobile clamped to the ear.
    >
    >They do like it when you cheerfully remind them that it will soon be illegal as you pass by :)

    I managed to cycle and talk on my mobile the other day as I cycled up a steep hill in Padstow. I
    wondered if that too would be made illegal.
    --
    remove remove to reply
     
  7. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Ben <[email protected]> writes
    >chris French wrote:
    >> It's summer (and it sunny....), lots of people have their car windows open, a number of them like
    >> to sit with the mobile clamped to the ear.
    >>
    >> They do like it when you cheerfully remind them that it will soon be illegal as you pass by :)
    >
    >What's the point? I

    Most likely very little.

    >t's not illegal now, when it is, they'll get done for it. End of story. Why go out of your way to
    >antagonise someone and potentially ruin your day when one of them gets arsey with you?

    What's life without a few risks? :)
    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  8. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Frank X <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >"chris French" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> It's summer (and it sunny....), lots of people have their car windows open, a number of them like
    >> to sit with the mobile clamped to the ear.
    >>
    >> They do like it when you cheerfully remind them that it will soon be illegal as you pass by :)
    >> --
    >Are you sure it's illegal?
    >
    No, I'm absolutely sure that it is legal.

    But government has said that it plans to make it illegal.
    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  9. Msa

    Msa Guest

    > >Are you sure it's illegal?
    > >
    > No, I'm absolutely sure that it is legal.
    >
    > But government has said that it plans to make it illegal.
    > --
    > Chris French, Leeds

    Correct.

    --
    Mark

    "Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak"
     
  10. Stephen \

    Stephen \ Guest

    chris French wrote:
    > It's summer (and it sunny....), lots of people have their car windows open, a number of them like
    > to sit with the mobile clamped to the ear.
    >
    > They do like it when you cheerfully remind them that it will soon be illegal as you pass by :)

    Just cycling by them seems to wind them up enough
     
  11. Thomas

    Thomas Guest

    "Stephen (aka steford)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > chris French wrote:
    > > It's summer (and it sunny....), lots of people have their car windows open, a number of them
    > > like to sit with the mobile clamped to the ear.
    > >
    > > They do like it when you cheerfully remind them that it will soon be illegal as you pass by :)
    >
    > Just cycling by them seems to wind them up enough

    Indeed.

    I have my favourite stretch on the commute in to work. About five sets of traffic lights along a
    busy stretch of road from Westbourne Park onwards. I accelerate away from the lights at a good
    speed, car driver eventually overtakes and then stops at the lights ahead. I pull up next to the car
    and the cycle is repeated. Some of the drivers appear to get quite upset at this ;)

    Although that makes me wonder about one strange phenominum I've noticed: There are a couple of
    junctions where there's loads of traffic going across in front and virtually nothing on the road I'm
    on, waiting to cross. So, I'm stopped at the traffic lights, another cyclist (usually a *very* slow
    cyclist) passes over the pedestrian crossing, right up to the lip of the road, waits until a gap
    appears and then crosses through a red light. The thing is, the reason there's a gap in the traffic
    is because the lights have just changed to red on the busy road...

    Where's the sense in that?

    Thomas.
     
  12. Ben wrote:

    > chris French wrote:
    >
    >>It's summer (and it sunny....), lots of people have their car windows open, a number of them like
    >>to sit with the mobile clamped to the ear.
    >>
    >>They do like it when you cheerfully remind them that it will soon be illegal as you pass by :)
    >
    >
    > What's the point? It's not illegal now, when it is, they'll get done for it. End of story. Why go
    > out of your way to antagonise someone and potentially ruin your day when one of them gets arsey
    > with you?

    "When its illegal they'll get done for it" -- oh how I wish I lived in a society where transgressors
    of laws were actually booked.

    Around here it has *always* been illegal to use a hand-held mobile phone while driving, and every
    day I see motorists doing it.

    A loud "PUT THE PHONE DOWN" seems to get the point across without being too rude. A friend of mine
    advocates reaching in, removing the phone, and hurling it across the road.

    Adrian

    ---------------------------------------------------------------
    Adrian Tritschler mailto:[email protected] Latitude 38°S, Longitude 145°E,
    Altitude 50m, Shoe size 44
    ---------------------------------------------------------------
     
  13. Adrian Tritschler wrote:

    > A loud "PUT THE PHONE DOWN" seems to get the point across without being too rude. A friend of mine
    > advocates reaching in, removing the phone, and hurling it across the road.

    Better yet, remove the ignition keys and ride off with them, cackling. When out of sight, drop them
    down a drain or hurl them into the canal.

    The Mgt whished to make it clear that the Kids should not try this at home or, indeed, anywhere
    else, unless they /really/ want to.

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  14. Thomas wrote:

    > Where's the sense in that?

    OK, here's another brain-twister. I am stopped at a red light, behind the white line, like a gude
    little boy, when out of the west comes a cyclist. Cyclist advances over the white line and *right*
    up to the edge of the junction. from here, he can make a lightning getaway when the lights change.
    Except that he's so far forward he can't see the lights change and has to rely on revving engines or
    overtaking cyclists to give him the cue to wobble off (they *always* wobble, because they have no
    notion of the use of gears). Thereby gaining no advantage whatsoever. I Am Confused.

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  15. Tim Woodall

    Tim Woodall Guest

    On Wed, 9 Jul 2003 22:48:19 +0100, Thomas <> wrote:
    > Although that makes me wonder about one strange phenominum I've noticed: There are a couple of
    > junctions where there's loads of traffic going across in front and virtually nothing on the road
    > I'm on, waiting to cross. So, I'm stopped at the traffic lights, another cyclist (usually a *very*
    > slow cyclist) passes over the pedestrian crossing, right up to the lip of the road, waits until a
    > gap appears and then crosses through a red light. The thing is, the reason there's a gap in the
    > traffic is because the lights have just changed to red on the busy road...
    >
    > Where's the sense in that?
    >
    Because if you are a slow cyclist who doesn't want to belt it from the lights (does this mean you're
    not a Cyclist? :) then you want all the head start possible to clear the pinch point at the other
    side of the lights before the cars start passing you. Sitting in the queue doesn't help because
    there will still be cars behind you who will overtake.

    Just my 0.02EUR.

    Tim.

    --
    God said, "div D = rho, div B = 0, curl E = - @B/@t, curl H = J + @D/@t," and there was light.

    http://tjw.hn.org/ http://www.locofungus.btinternet.co.uk/
     
  16. Not Me

    Not Me Guest

    Dave Larrington deftly scribbled:

    > Adrian Tritschler wrote:
    >
    >> A loud "PUT THE PHONE DOWN" seems to get the point across without being too rude. A friend of
    >> mine advocates reaching in, removing the phone, and hurling it across the road.
    >
    > Better yet, remove the ignition keys and ride off with them, cackling. When out of sight, drop
    > them down a drain or hurl them into the canal.

    I'd seriously not suggest anyone actually try this .. I know someone who tried this, was grabbed by
    the arm, and came off quite badly.

    Personally, if anyone, cyclist or pedestrian, tries to take my ignition keys, phone or whatever,
    then I see them as fair game and they *will* get severe damage done to their arm or hand. They will
    also be dragged, if necessary, to the nearest police station to atone for trying to steal my car.

    --
    Digweed
     
  17. John B

    John B Guest

    "Not me, someone else" wrote:

    > Dave Larrington deftly scribbled:
    >
    > > Adrian Tritschler wrote:
    > >
    > >> A loud "PUT THE PHONE DOWN" seems to get the point across without being too rude. A friend of
    > >> mine advocates reaching in, removing the phone, and hurling it across the road.
    > >
    > > Better yet, remove the ignition keys and ride off with them, cackling. When out of sight, drop
    > > them down a drain or hurl them into the canal.
    >
    > I'd seriously not suggest anyone actually try this
    >

    I must admit to having done this once after a driver tried to shorten my life. I advised the driver
    that they could collect them from the police station.

    Mr Plod was quite impressed :)

    A friend of mine once did it to the driver of a London bus that knocked him off.

    I agree it is not really advisable tho'.

    John B
     
  18. Not Me

    Not Me Guest

    John B deftly scribbled:

    > "Not me, someone else" wrote:
    >
    >> Dave Larrington deftly scribbled:
    >>
    >>> Adrian Tritschler wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> A loud "PUT THE PHONE DOWN" seems to get the point across without being too rude. A friend of
    >>>> mine advocates reaching in, removing the phone, and hurling it across the road.
    >>>
    >>> Better yet, remove the ignition keys and ride off with them, cackling. When out of sight, drop
    >>> them down a drain or hurl them into the canal.
    >>
    >> I'd seriously not suggest anyone actually try this
    >>
    >
    > I must admit to having done this once after a driver tried to shorten my life. I advised the
    > driver that they could collect them from the police station.
    >
    > Mr Plod was quite impressed :)
    >
    > A friend of mine once did it to the driver of a London bus that knocked him off.
    >
    > I agree it is not really advisable tho'.

    In certain circumstances no worries .. at the scene of an accident it may be entirely appropriate to
    deprive some nutter of his car keys, but if all the motorist has done is used his phone and a
    passing cyclist has simply decided to 'wind him up', then said cyclist may be on very sticky ground,
    from both a moral and a legal aspect.

    My point being that the OP wanted simply to 'wind motorists up', which is just asking for trouble.

    Aren't there already enough reports in this very newsgroup that cyclists get cut up by irate,
    irresponsible or blind motorists ? What good will winding another motorist up even more do anyone ?

    --
    Digweed
     
  19. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 11:31:58 +0100 someone who may be "Not me, someone else"
    <[email protected]> wrote this:-

    >Personally, if anyone, cyclist or pedestrian, tries to take my ignition keys, phone or whatever,
    >then I see them as fair game and they *will* get severe damage done to their arm or hand.

    That might be difficult to defend in the subsequent court case. One can only do what is reasonable
    and this might well not pass that test.

    >They will also be dragged, if necessary, to the nearest police station

    I would have thought that this is impossible to justify as reasonable.

    >to atone for trying to steal my car.

    Someone was trying to steal your car by taking the ignition keys, a mobile phone or whatever. That
    would be a fascinating one to try and convince the courts about.

    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number F566DA0E I will always explain revoked
    keys, unless the UK government prevents me using the RIP Act 2000.
     
  20. Ben

    Ben Guest

    On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 13:46:43 +0100, David Hansen <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 11:31:58 +0100 someone who may be "Not me, someone else"
    ><[email protected]> wrote this:-
    >
    >>Personally, if anyone, cyclist or pedestrian, tries to take my ignition keys, phone or whatever,
    >>then I see them as fair game and they *will* get severe damage done to their arm or hand.
    >
    >That might be difficult to defend in the subsequent court case. One can only do what is reasonable
    >and this might well not pass that test.
    >
    >Someone was trying to steal your car by taking the ignition keys, a mobile phone or whatever. That
    >would be a fascinating one to try and convince the courts about.

    You miss the point that even taking the keys is theft.

    'Not me' is spot on, IMO, about stopping someone taking their keys. Likewise the poster who
    suggested spitting in the car would be likely to get punched by me.

    I must say, the amount of 'them v us' advocacy in this group is extremely wearing. I've been riding
    a long time, driving a fair while and riding motorcycles as well, and I've never felt the need to
    behave in the way suggested by some in this thread. If you wouldn't do it to someone's face when
    you're stood in front of them, don't do it when you're able to 'run away' on your bike.
    --
    "We take these risks, not to escape from life, but to prevent life escaping from us." ***** replace
    'spam' with 'ben' to reply *****
     
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