Wine Tasting

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Ranee Mueller, Dec 2, 2005.

  1. I'm no wine snob, I don't know a whole lot about different wines,
    only what I like and don't like. I've read a bit about them, so there
    are some facts and trivia that I know, but that's pretty much it. Well,
    the restaurant on the airport invited us to a six course wine tasting
    meal. Rich doesn't drink, so they pulled out some nice sparkling cider
    for him, and we got a nice date out of it.

    I have lost the sheet of paper with the wine list on it, but they
    were all very nice wines, and I got to learn quite a bit about wine and
    how the food paired with it changes the flavor. The only wine I wasn't
    really keen on was the Sauvignon Blanc, but I don't generally like those
    anyway, and it was much better than expected and drinkable.

    I had seconds on the Gewurztraminer with the clam chowder and thirds
    after the meal was over. One of the reds was a blend of six or nine red
    wines, and you tasted a different wine depending on which food you were
    eating. The port at the end was served with a divine creme brulee, and
    both were extraordinary.

    We had the Gewurztraminer with the clam chowder, the Sauvignon Blanc
    with a spinach salad with candied walnuts and dried cranberries, a
    Riesling (Pacific Rim something or other, I wish I could find the wine
    sheet) with chicken sate on fried rice sticks (it was too salty, but the
    peanut sauce was perfect), the blended red - Jess Red - with asparagus
    in a lemon sauce and a bit of rice pilaf, a gorgeous Merlot with pork
    tenderloin served on spiced apple rings with a creamy rosemary sauce
    over it and the creme brulee with the Port. It was a lovely meal and a
    nice time.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
    Tags:


  2. modom

    modom Guest

    On Fri, 02 Dec 2005 21:20:42 -0800, Ranee Mueller
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm no wine snob, I don't know a whole lot about different wines,
    >only what I like and don't like. I've read a bit about them, so there
    >are some facts and trivia that I know, but that's pretty much it. Well,
    >the restaurant on the airport invited us to a six course wine tasting
    >meal. Rich doesn't drink, so they pulled out some nice sparkling cider
    >for him, and we got a nice date out of it.
    >
    > I have lost the sheet of paper with the wine list on it, but they
    >were all very nice wines, and I got to learn quite a bit about wine and
    >how the food paired with it changes the flavor. The only wine I wasn't
    >really keen on was the Sauvignon Blanc, but I don't generally like those
    >anyway, and it was much better than expected and drinkable.
    >
    > I had seconds on the Gewurztraminer with the clam chowder and thirds
    >after the meal was over. One of the reds was a blend of six or nine red
    >wines, and you tasted a different wine depending on which food you were
    >eating. The port at the end was served with a divine creme brulee, and
    >both were extraordinary.
    >
    > We had the Gewurztraminer with the clam chowder, the Sauvignon Blanc
    >with a spinach salad with candied walnuts and dried cranberries, a
    >Riesling (Pacific Rim something or other, I wish I could find the wine
    >sheet) with chicken sate on fried rice sticks (it was too salty, but the
    >peanut sauce was perfect), the blended red - Jess Red - with asparagus
    >in a lemon sauce and a bit of rice pilaf, a gorgeous Merlot with pork
    >tenderloin served on spiced apple rings with a creamy rosemary sauce
    >over it and the creme brulee with the Port. It was a lovely meal and a
    >nice time.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ranee
    >
    >Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.
    >
    >"She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13
    >

    Sounds fantastic. Except maybe that part about the airport -- I
    didn't understand that, but probably that's just me.

    Events like the one you describe can be truly memorable. I've done
    one in Dallas as a guest of a friend who'd won a charity lottery. The
    evening was a little odd, but the wine was fine.

    Thanks for sharing your event.


    modom
     
  3. Stan  Horwitz

    Stan Horwitz Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Ranee Mueller <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm no wine snob, I don't know a whole lot about different wines,
    > only what I like and don't like. I've read a bit about them, so there
    > are some facts and trivia that I know, but that's pretty much it. Well,
    > the restaurant on the airport invited us to a six course wine tasting
    > meal. Rich doesn't drink, so they pulled out some nice sparkling cider
    > for him, and we got a nice date out of it.


    Sounds like a nice evening. Perhaps you can contact the manager at that
    restaurant to see if you can get a copy of that wine tasting paper?
     
  4. Kathy in NZ

    Kathy in NZ Guest

    On Fri, 02 Dec 2005 21:20:42 -0800, Ranee Mueller
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm no wine snob, I don't know a whole lot about different wines,



    > The only wine I wasn't
    >really keen on was the Sauvignon Blanc, but I don't generally like those
    >anyway, and it was much better than expected and drinkable.


    Each to their own, but sauvignon blanc is my favourite wine type. I am
    not a wine snob either, just know what my taste buds demand. I will
    drink chardonnay or pinos gris (pinot grigio in Italy) but prefer sb.
    Gewurtz is great with spicy food, but sb is my all time best. I have
    found I like the cheaper wines more than the expensive ones. My taste
    buds are immature, maybe. New World wines appeal because they shout of
    fruit, not hint at it, as old world wines are reputed to do.

    Just to blow our own trumpet, try NZ sauvignon blancs and see if you
    like them. We do sb far better than Australia does. To give them
    credit, they do reds (in general) better than NZ does. I cannot speak
    for US wines as they're unknown here. Ours are terrific. Even when
    travelling the world, I will head for NZ wines after trying local
    ones.

    I am passionate about NZ wines, if you haven't already guessed!
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>,
    modom <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Sounds fantastic. Except maybe that part about the airport -- I
    > didn't understand that, but probably that's just me.


    *laugh* I live on an airport, small airport, that my husband
    manages. This is the fly in restaurant, though you can drive to it as
    well. It has exceptional food. Not a high ranking, fancy place, but a
    bit more upscale than the greasy spoon diner type places usually found
    at airports. We like that kind of restaurant as well.

    > Events like the one you describe can be truly memorable. I've done
    > one in Dallas as a guest of a friend who'd won a charity lottery. The
    > evening was a little odd, but the wine was fine.
    >
    > Thanks for sharing your event.


    You are welcome. They are talking about doing these meals once a
    month, now.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Kathy in NZ) wrote:

    > Each to their own, but sauvignon blanc is my favourite wine type. I am
    > not a wine snob either, just know what my taste buds demand. I will
    > drink chardonnay or pinos gris (pinot grigio in Italy) but prefer sb.
    > Gewurtz is great with spicy food, but sb is my all time best. I have
    > found I like the cheaper wines more than the expensive ones. My taste
    > buds are immature, maybe. New World wines appeal because they shout of
    > fruit, not hint at it, as old world wines are reputed to do.


    I'm not a huge fan of most white wines, really. I lucked out that
    two of the whites I actually like were served. :)

    > Just to blow our own trumpet, try NZ sauvignon blancs and see if you
    > like them. We do sb far better than Australia does. To give them
    > credit, they do reds (in general) better than NZ does. I cannot speak
    > for US wines as they're unknown here. Ours are terrific. Even when
    > travelling the world, I will head for NZ wines after trying local
    > ones.


    I live in a wine producing state, myself, and have really enjoyed
    local winery samplings. I grew up in a wine state as well. I've been
    fortunate. I am a huge red wine fan, and only like Gewurztraminer,
    Riesling and sparkling whites. That's not true, my outlaws brought me
    some lovely Pinot Grigio that I enjoyed, but I would have preferred a
    red wine. I have had many Australian wines, but I don't know if I've
    ever had any NZ wines. This may be because of the white/red thing
    though.

    > I am passionate about NZ wines, if you haven't already guessed!


    No? ;) I just recently found a sparkling Shiraz that I am excited
    about trying. If it's any good, I'm going to go and pick up a whole lot
    more.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  7. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    modom <[email protected]> wrote:


    > Sounds fantastic. Except maybe that part about the airport -- I
    > didn't understand that, but probably that's just me.



    Small airports generally have a decent restaurant. If you have enough
    money to buy a plane, you have enough money to eat at a restaurant. We
    have an airport about half a mile away, and we eat there once a year or
    so. It's more of a coffee shop place. Sometimes I walk there. It used
    to be possible to take the back way. Now there is a pedestrian path.


    It's called the Two Niner Diner. That's some kind of airplane talk. I
    forget what it means.

    http://www.airnav.com/airport/O69/TWO_NINER_DINER

    --
    Dan Abel
    [email protected]
    Petaluma, California, USA
     
  8. Kathy in NZ

    Kathy in NZ Guest

    On Sat, 17 Dec 2005 21:52:23 -0800, Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:


    >
    >Small airports generally have a decent restaurant. If you have enough
    >money to buy a plane, you have enough money to eat at a restaurant.

    <snipped>
    -
    >Dan Abel
    >[email protected]
    >Petaluma, California, USA


    LOL, gee, I doubt I'll ever have enough money to buy a plane. I can
    only afford a seat in one.

    Kathy in NZ
     
  9. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Dan Abel" <[email protected]> wrote

    > Small airports generally have a decent restaurant. If you have enough
    > money to buy a plane, you have enough money to eat at a restaurant. We
    > have an airport about half a mile away, and we eat there once a year or
    > so. It's more of a coffee shop place. Sometimes I walk there. It used
    > to be possible to take the back way. Now there is a pedestrian path.


    > It's called the Two Niner Diner. That's some kind of airplane talk. I
    > forget what it means.


    There is/was a place at an airport near me. It pretty much sucked, but
    that's neither here nor there, it's just that someone I knew kept going on
    about it and it was a dive with bad food. Thing is, they had ... uh ...
    things on the tables so you could hear the control tower and the pilots
    communicating. Reminded me of the Staten Island ferry, squawk squawk
    squawk and NO SMOKING. You couldn't understand a word they said.
    I certainly hope the pilots had better radios. Disturbing.

    nancy
     
  10. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Dan Abel" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> Small airports generally have a decent restaurant. If you have enough
    >> money to buy a plane, you have enough money to eat at a restaurant. We
    >> have an airport about half a mile away, and we eat there once a year or
    >> so. It's more of a coffee shop place. Sometimes I walk there. It used
    >> to be possible to take the back way. Now there is a pedestrian path.

    >
    >> It's called the Two Niner Diner. That's some kind of airplane talk. I
    >> forget what it means.

    >
    > There is/was a place at an airport near me. It pretty much sucked, but
    > that's neither here nor there, it's just that someone I knew kept going on
    > about it and it was a dive with bad food. Thing is, they had ... uh ...
    > things on the tables so you could hear the control tower and the pilots
    > communicating. Reminded me of the Staten Island ferry, squawk squawk
    > squawk and NO SMOKING. You couldn't understand a word they said.
    > I certainly hope the pilots had better radios. Disturbing.
    >
    > nancy

    The only airport restaurant I've ever eaten in that I can remember was a
    real restaurant was one at LAX. It was high from the ground and round.
    Maybe it isn't even there anymore. The food was decent as far as I remember
    I'm not sure if it revolved like one in San Francisco or the Space needle.

    Yes, I often wonder how the pilots understand that squawk, squawk. Maybe
    some of them actually don't!
    The last time DH and I were on the subway in NY, the squawkers were
    announcing at each stop for certain people to move to the back of the cars.
    We were worried because we didn't understand if we were one of the travelers
    who should be doing this. You can't believe how many people helped us out.
    But they all got a big kick out of it that we couldn't understand the
    squawkers. It was a riot!
    Dee Dee
     
  11. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote

    > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote


    >> communicating. Reminded me of the Staten Island ferry, squawk squawk
    >> squawk and NO SMOKING. You couldn't understand a word they said.
    >> I certainly hope the pilots had better radios. Disturbing.


    > The only airport restaurant I've ever eaten in that I can remember was a
    > real restaurant was one at LAX. It was high from the ground and round.
    > Maybe it isn't even there anymore. The food was decent as far as I
    > remember I'm not sure if it revolved like one in San Francisco or the
    > Space needle.


    Hmmm, high off the ground on what appears to be a structurally impossible
    building, balancing a restaurant on top and rotating. I'd love to see
    Seattle, but not! from the top of the Space Needle. (smile)

    > Yes, I often wonder how the pilots understand that squawk, squawk. Maybe
    > some of them actually don't!


    That's the disturbing part! No, runway two, TWO! not FOUR! Ahhhhh!
    Crash.

    > The last time DH and I were on the subway in NY, the squawkers were
    > announcing at each stop for certain people to move to the back of the
    > cars. We were worried because we didn't understand if we were one of the
    > travelers who should be doing this.


    That's so funny, I haven't been on the subway since they started that.
    Safe to say get away from the doors so people can get on or off.
    Stare at the maps on the sides of the cars so you know when you're
    getting close.

    >You can't believe how many people helped us out.


    I can, but then I grew up with New Yorkers.

    > But they all got a big kick out of it that we couldn't understand the
    > squawkers. It was a riot!


    Cute. But really ... you don't know what they're saying. You'd
    have thought PA systems would have progressed by now.

    nancy
     
  12. Gene Seibel

    Gene Seibel Guest

    Lots of little airport restaurants out there. Many are small "home
    cooking" types. Some are quite good. Usually on Saturday mornings
    pilots get together and fly somewhere for a "$100 hamburger." That of
    course refers to the cost of getting there.
    --
    Gene Seibel
    Tales of Flight - http://pad39a.com/gene/tales.html
    Because I fly, I envy no one.
     
  13. Chuck

    Chuck Guest

    On 19 Dec 2005 07:29:14 -0800, "Gene Seibel" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Lots of little airport restaurants out there. Many are small "home
    >cooking" types. Some are quite good. Usually on Saturday mornings
    >pilots get together and fly somewhere for a "$100 hamburger." That of
    >course refers to the cost of getting there.


    Restaurant in the hotel, connected to the main terminal at KAGS
    Augusta GA airport,, Best cuts of beef.. fine food

    (Tripacer is a handful at times.. Flew one a bit 15 years ago.. Lacked
    enough aleron in my opnion. Had strong cross wind take off from First
    flight (kill devil hills) it opened my eyes.. )

    Chuck (in SC)
     
  14. Gene Seibel

    Gene Seibel Guest

    Yeah, my Tri-Pacer got away from me a couple times. Not great in
    crosswinds. But I had a lot of great times in it.
    --
    Gene Seibel
    Gene & Sue's Aeroplanes - http://pad39a.com/gene/planes.html
    Because we fly, we envy no one.
     
  15. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > There is/was a place at an airport near me. It pretty much sucked, but
    > that's neither here nor there, it's just that someone I knew kept going on
    > about it and it was a dive with bad food. Thing is, they had ... uh ...
    > things on the tables so you could hear the control tower and the pilots
    > communicating. Reminded me of the Staten Island ferry, squawk squawk
    > squawk and NO SMOKING. You couldn't understand a word they said.
    > I certainly hope the pilots had better radios. Disturbing.


    They do have better radios, but you also have to be used to what
    you're listening for, if that makes sense. With the headsets on, you
    are attuned to the tower and traffic around you, and you know what the
    terms are.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
Loading...