WinTech vs. Vetta 100 vs. Shimano 6502 vs. Cateye 3000



O

Onefred

Guest
Hey

I've been considering putting a cyclometer on my road bike and have been looking at some of the
wireless models. The one that has really captured my attention is the Wintech by Mavic. I like
its innovative skewer/transmitter design and it appears to offer wireless cadence. BUT, does is
work good? Mavic has a nasty habit of introducing products and then pulling them when they don't
fly off the shelves. From using the interactive guide at Mavic.com, this seems like a simple unit
to operate.

Coming in at a very close second is the 10 speed compatible 6502 computer from Shimano, but I don't
know if it will have a wireless option. I like this computer for its vitrual cadence function. This
is innovative, in my opinion.

Then there is the Vetta 100 which, AFAIK, was the first to have wireless cadence. Does this wireless
computer work reliably? How is the precision of this unit?

Lastly, Cateye is coming out with an all wireless computer w/cadence called the 3000 or something
similar. It has a multi-colored display. Anybody see this at the shows, or did you hear something?
If so, what's your opinion?

Do any of these units calculate average speed down to the hundredth of a MPH? I would miss this if I
didn't have it.

Any other suggestions? I'd consider a unit w/HRM, but I already have several HRM's and don't want to
spend much more for this feature in a cyclometer.

Dave
 
Here's my opinion on the Mavic Wireless Computer. Its really cool that the receiving part is built into the skewer and it makes it a lot cleaner looking than some chunky thing you tie to your fork blad, but the computer itself is huge! I just saw one on somebody's bike and its a monster in size.

The new Specialized wireless computer is pretty cool looking. Just found out that it is the only computer on the market, wired or wireless, that has a mileage countdown. So, if your doing a race or a ride, you can set the miles to like 100 or whatever and then the computer will display the number of miles remaining. How many times have you been at it and thought, "ok whatever minus how far we've gone = number of miles we have to go"?
 
"BaCardi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Here's my opinion on the Mavic Wireless Computer. Its really cool that the
> receiving part is built into the skewer and it makes it a lot cleaner looking
> than some chunky thing you tie to your fork blad, but the computer itself is
> huge! I just saw one on somebody's bike and its a monster in size.

Hey Jon,

Hmm, that's another thing you can't determine over the Internet. Thanks for
sharing this, I most certainly will be removing the Wintech from my list of
choices. I don't like big computers. I haven't thought of this and I should do a
little more homework to see if I can find the sizes of the other computers. I
wish I could find a computer the size of my 45tt (or a wireless mount for it).

> The new Specialized wireless computer is pretty cool looking. Just found out
> that it is the only computer on the market, wired or wireless, that has a
> mileage countdown. So, if your doing a race or a ride, you can set the miles to
> like 100 or whatever and then the computer will display the number of miles
> remaining. How many times have you been at it and thought, "ok whatever minus
> how far we've gone
> = number of miles we have to go"?

Yeah, I forgot about Specialized, and they do make some nice computers, too. And
any idea of the precision of the number displays?

Dave
 
onefred wrote:
> Hey
>
> Lastly, Cateye is coming out with an all wireless computer
> w/cadence
called
> the 3000 or something similar. It has a multi-colored
> display. Anybody see this at the shows, or did you hear
> something? If so, what's your opinion?

I dislike Cateyes in general because of their left-handed
button arrangement (the left button is the one that is used
99% of the time while riding), their restriction to only
military time, their constantly blinking display, and their
manual turn-on and turn-off. (On every other bike computer
I've used, the functions of time, distance, etc turn on
automatically with movement. You have to manually turn this
on and off with Cateyes. If you forget to turn it on, no
milage or time. If you forget to turn it off after the ride,
your average speed goes to 0.) But people put up with these
design flaws because Cateyes handle wet weather so well.

> Do any of these units calculate average speed down to the
> hundredth of a MPH? I would miss this if I didn't have it.

Avocet used to. Avocets are notoriously fragile, though.
 
On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 07:46:37 -0800, Jay Hill <[email protected]>
wrote:
>I dislike Cateyes in general because of their left-handed
>button arrangement (the left button is the one that is used
>99% of the time while riding), their restriction to only
>military time,

These two issues exist but do not bother me...personal
preference.

>their constantly blinking display,

My two Cateye Astrales don't blink. My cat, OTOH, does
blink her eyes.

>and their manual turn-on and turn-off. (On every other bike
>computer I've used, the functions of time, distance, etc
>turn on automatically with movement. You have to manually
>turn this on and off with Cateyes. If you forget to turn it
>on, no milage or time. If you forget to turn it off after
>the ride, your average speed goes to 0.)

Perhaps you didn't adequately explore the manual and
features. This is an option. I don't like it, so I set it
to auto, like other computers. When set to auto, it brings
forth another feature that I really like: by pressing the
button on the right, the cadence and speed displays
switch, so the cadence is the big number and speed is the
small number.

> But people put up with these design flaws because Cateyes
> handle wet weather so well.

I don't do a lot of wet weather riding, so I can't comment
on that; however, I like my two Astrales better than the
computers I have by Trek and Specialized for other reasons:
- The cadence/speed display switching mentioned above
- Everything (speed, cadence, etc) registers instantly.

On the Trek and Specialized, I have to wait for the speed
display to catch up sometimes; and more annoyingly, I have
to wait 5 or 6 seconds for cadence to register _anything_ if
I've looked at something other than cadence or if I've
stopped pedalling for a few seconds, and if I change my
cadence, it takes a few seconds to catch up.

OTOH, my Cateyes show cadence instantly as I switch to
view cadence, or as I resume pedalling, or as I change
my cadence.

I also like the mount. It is secure yet easy to remove,
because it has a latch, unlike my other computers; and,
turning the mount over, you can remove the band from it and
mount it in any odd way you want, if you so please. I intend
to mount one to a stem soon with adhesive-backed velcro,
after removing the band.

>> Do any of these units calculate average speed down to
>> the hundredth of a MPH? I would miss this if I didn't
>> have it.
>
>Avocet used to. Avocets are notoriously fragile, though.

I'd question the need for hundredth of a mph accuracy, but
to each his own.
--
Rick Onanian
 
"BaCardi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Here's my opinion on the Mavic Wireless Computer. Its
> really cool that the receiving part is built into the
> skewer and it makes it a lot cleaner looking than some
> chunky thing you tie to your fork blad, but the computer
> itself is huge! I just saw one on somebody's bike and its
> a monster in size.
>
> The new Specialized wireless computer is pretty cool
> looking. Just found out that it is the only computer on
> the market, wired or wireless, that has a mileage
> countdown. So, if your doing a race or a ride, you can set
> the miles to like 100 or whatever and then the computer
> will display the number of miles remaining. How many times
> have you been at it and thought, "ok whatever minus how
> far we've gone
> = number of miles we have to go"?
>

Don't know about the Mavic, but I have used a Vetta v100
wireless for about a year now. Aside from a bad one that got
replaced by the retailer, it has worked just fine. No
problems with either the wireless speed or cadence features.
It has a wide array of features and is not overly
complicated.

My only minor dislike is with the number of digits displayed
on the speed and distance functions. Speed is only shown to
the whole number, and trip distance to a 1/10 of a mile. Not
a big deal, but it is kind of nice to see more digits.
Mounting options are also a bit limited. You need about 1.5
inches of bar width, and there are no provisions to mount
the computer on the stem or cantilevered over the stem as
some brands do.
 
Originally posted by Jay Hill
onefred wrote:

> Do any of these units calculate average speed down to the
> hundredth of a MPH? I would miss this if I didn't have it.

Avocet used to. Avocets are notoriously fragile, though.


My old Avocet only calculated to a tenth of a mile. I'm not sure if there is any computer on the market that can calculate to a hundredth of a mile, but for the original poster. What difference does it make knowing you are going 23.1 miles per hour compared to 23.17 miles per hour?
 
Jay Hill <[email protected]> wrote in
news:[email protected]:

> (On every other bike computer I've used, the functions of
> time, distance, etc turn on automatically with movement.
> You have to manually turn this on and off with Cateyes.
> If you forget to turn it on, no milage or time. If you
> forget to turn it off after the ride, your average speed
> goes to 0.)
>

Not with the Astrale.
 
Jay Hill <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
>
> I dislike Cateyes in general because of their left-handed
> button arrangement (the left button is the one that is
> used 99% of the time while riding), their restriction to
> only military time, their constantly blinking display, and
> their manual turn-on and turn-off. (On every other bike
> computer I've used, the functions of time, distance, etc
> turn on automatically with movement. You have to manually
> turn this on and off with Cateyes. If you forget to turn
> it on, no milage or time. If you forget to turn it off
> after the ride, your average speed goes to 0.) But people
> put up with these design flaws because Cateyes handle wet
> weather so well.
>
> > Do any of these units calculate average speed down to
> > the hundredth of a MPH? I would miss this if I didn't
> > have it.
>
> Avocet used to. Avocets are notoriously fragile, though.

Hi, the newer CatEyes have one button on top and the other
on the backside, no left or right. They can be set to
operate automatically, like other computers. It's in the
manual. I really like my CatEye Astrale.

As far as average speed to the hundreth, the CatEye doesn't,
but my Sigma Sport does. I would rather use a calculator
later to record my time in hundredths and have the benefits
of the Astrale, during my rides. The current model CatEyes
really look nice and streamlined. Here take a look:
http://www.cateye.com/browse.php?cat=com Life is Good! Jeff
 
"BaCardi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Jay Hill wrote:
> > onefred wrote:
> > > Do any of these units calculate average speed down
> > > to the hundredth
of
> > > a MPH? I would miss this if I didn't have it.
> > Avocet used to. Avocets are notoriously fragile,
> > though.
>
>
>
>
> My old Avocet only calculated to a tenth of a mile. I'm
> not sure if there is any computer on the market that can
> calculate to a hundredth of a mile, but for the original
> poster. What difference does it make knowing you are going
> 23.1 miles per hour compared to
> 23.17 miles per hour?

My 45tt calcs to 1/100th but it unfortunately is not avail.
wireless, AFAIK.

When you are riding it's a whole lot nicer to see your
average drop only
1/100th of a MPH (which is easy to make up even after 80+
miles) than 1/10th of a MPH. Basically, you can quickly
see when your average begins dropping and correct it.
IMO, it's certainly easier than watching an arrow all the
time. Plus, it's real sweet to see the progress being
tacked on as your average is increasing, and it's nice to
know how much more you need to go until you increase
another 1/10th.

Imagine starting a climb to find at the top your average
dropped 5/100ths. You know to try to make this much up on
the decent.

Dave
 
Rick Onanian wrote:
>
>>their constantly blinking display,
>
> My two Cateye Astrales don't blink. My cat, OTOH, does
> blink her eyes.

It's the mile/h symbol in the upper right of the display. My
model is several years old, though.

>>and their manual turn-on and turn-off. (On every other
>>bike computer I've used, the funct

> Perhaps you didn't adequately explore the manual and
> features. This is an option.

You're right. Mea culpa on this one. It looks like my model
can allow this to be turned off. Thanks for the prompting me
to rtfm better. This was the most irritating thing to me.

>I don't like it, so I set it to auto, like other computers.
>When set to auto, it brings forth another feature that I
>really like: by pressing the button on the right, the
>cadence and speed displays switch, so the cadence is the
>big number and speed is the small number.

Thanks for pointing that out.

Extra cadence features that my Vettas have are average and
max cadence, which I like more than I thought I would,
especially on my fixed gear.
 
Jay Hill <[email protected]> wrote:
>I dislike Cateyes in general because of their left-handed
>button arrangement (the left button is the one that is used
>99% of the time while riding), their restriction to only
>military time, their constantly blinking display, and their
>manual turn-on and turn-off.

The blinking display aside, these are not true anymore and
have not been for some years. There is, however, a
deficiency in at least some current models in that the
selection of 12 or 24 hour clocks is based on the miles
versus kilometres setting, which is awkward for British
people because all road distances are still marked in miles
but many of us have become accustomed to the more sensible
24 hour clock.
--
David Damerell <[email protected]> flcl?
 
David Damerell wrote:

> Jay Hill <[email protected]> wrote:
>> I dislike Cateyes in general because of their left-handed
>> button arrangement (the left button is the one that is
>> used 99% of the time while riding), their restriction to
>> only military time, their constantly blinking display,
>> and their manual turn-on and turn-off.
>
> The blinking display aside, these are not true anymore and
> have not been for some years. There is, however, a
> deficiency in at least some current models in that the
> selection of 12 or 24 hour clocks is based on the miles
> versus kilometres setting, which is awkward for British
> people because all road distances are still marked in
> miles but many of us have become accustomed to the more
> sensible 24 hour clock.

Blinking display? Mine (Enduro 2) doesn't have this.

My main annoyance with these computers is that the average
speed readout just says "E" after a little under 28 hours
(or 1000 miles/km, but I have yet to exceed this on a
single ride.)

I would also prefer that the elapsed time wrap around at
12:00 or 24:00 rather than 10:00, but I guess they'd have to
add another digit to the display for this.

--
Benjamin Lewis

Thrashing is just virtual crashing.
 
Benjamin Lewis <[email protected]> wrote: [Cateye
cyclecomputers]
>Blinking display? Mine (Enduro 2) doesn't have this.

Not even the little 'M' or 'K' when moving with the computer
set to automatic on/off? That's all I have in mind.

>My main annoyance with these computers is that the average
>speed readout just says "E" after a little under 28 hours
>(or 1000 miles/km, but I have yet to exceed this on a
>single ride.)

That hasn't come up for me yet, but I suspect it will at
some point.

Not being able to use miles+24h clock does bug me, though.
--
David Damerell <[email protected]> Kill
the tomato!
 
David Damerell wrote:

> Benjamin Lewis <[email protected]> wrote: [Cateye
> cyclecomputers]
>> Blinking display? Mine (Enduro 2) doesn't have this.
>
> Not even the little 'M' or 'K' when moving with the
> computer set to automatic on/off? That's all I have
> in mind.

Oh. Maybe it does, I always have it set to manual. I don't
really use it much when I'm not randonneuring, and the auto
setting isn't as useful for that.

>> My main annoyance with these computers is that the
>> average speed readout just says "E" after a little under
>> 28 hours (or 1000 miles/km, but I have yet to exceed this
>> on a single ride.)
>
> That hasn't come up for me yet, but I suspect it will at
> some point.

Well it's only come up for me once so far, when I did my
first (and only, to date) 600 km brevet. I wasn't in any
danger of falling below the 15km/h minimum average speed,
but it's still kind of comforting to be sure with just a
quick glance at the computer. The "E" was not as comforting,
somehow...

> Not being able to use miles+24h clock does bug me, though.

Yeah, that would bug me too. You should lobby for
conversion to km :)

--
Benjamin Lewis

Seeing is deceiving. It's eating that's believing.
-- James Thurber
 
I realize the op has already eliminated consideration of the
Wintech but for the record...here's one more limitation of
this model: it can only be mounted on the stem, not the
bars. For some this might be great, for others a deal-
breaker, but it's certainly not very flexible.

By the way I have one, and I agree it's LARGE! However, I
put it on my travel bike, which is packed and unpacked
often, and the benefit of not having a transmitter strapped
to the fork is much appreciated!

Fred Roses