Winter clothing

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by gman0482, Sep 28, 2009.

  1. gman0482

    gman0482 Member

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    Hey everyone,
    Winter season is coming fast, and New England winters can be brutal. Already it is getting into the high 50's here, and on a sunny day, it can be tricky. I am wondering, what some of you wear in the colder days, and what is too much or not enough (as far as layers). I don't want to freeze, but aslo don't want to sweat, and then freeze.

    Thanks,
    -Greg
     
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  2. nbfman

    nbfman New Member

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    This old link might help.

    http://www.cyclingforums.com/bike-connections/7627-cycling-cold-weather.html

    I went to an outdoors store (like an REI or LL Bean) for ideas. I checked out the mountaineering section and got stuff like long-sleeve polypro underwear. Over the underwear, I wear multiple layers of riding shirts (usually, one thin and one thick) with a wind-proof outer garment, all of which unzip in the front for when it gets too hot. For the legs, I wear long riding tights with multiple sock layers to keep the feet warm. Last winter, I found that my ski socks (knee-high) worked well as the last sock layer. Ski gloves work well for the hands, too. This is all for riding in typical T's of 7-10C.
     
  3. gman0482

    gman0482 Member

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    Thanks thats helpful. I went for a ride 2 days ago, and it was about 60*F (15*C), but that was in the sun. My routes are all 95% in the shade so it was 10* colder, and not an enjoyable ride because I wasn't dressed right.
     
  4. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    Road shoe ae built so they are vented on top so they need to be covered with shoe covers otherwise your feet can get really cold.
    They will freezze up snap right off at the ankle. There is something very sad about looking down and seeing your shoes free-wheeling around the crank.
    Seriously get some covers along with the other items mentioned.
    I also use under armor with a built in wind breaker in the torso area.
     
  5. 64Paramount

    64Paramount Active Member

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    LOL

    Yep, I hate it when that happens. :D

    I don't bike in cold weather, but I do bike in 50 to 60 degree weather and wind chills can make that seem much cooler.

    Like others have mentioned: I wear long sleeved jerseys with windblocker front panels/normal jersey material on the back, I wear tights with windblocker front panels over my normal padded bike trunks/shorts, full coverage gloves over my normal padded bike gloves, and shoes covers over my normal bike shoes.

    I mainly just try to wear clothes that block the wind hitting me from the front, but allow heat and moisture to disipate on the back.

    When I ride in cooler temps it's not uncommon for my hands or feet to be too cool, but I'm sweating from the head and torso area. So, I've had to learn how to dress to maintain overall comfort.

    I've got several different brands of cool weather clothes, and most of them are several years old, and some are many years old as they don't get worn as much as my warm weather gear..

    But, as usual I bought most of them online from Performance Bike or Nashbar, when they had sales, or from my LBS when they had a sale...and I take the best care I can with them to make sure they last for a long time.
     
  6. nbfman

    nbfman New Member

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    I forgot to mention shoe and head covers. Shoe covers were mentioned above, but I tried two types - one that is thin and stretches over the shoe and another one that is thick and looks like it is made from the same material as a scuba suit. Multiple socks and the thinner cover have been enough for most of my rides. For the head, I bought a hood that extends over the neck and has a hole just for the face. When it is not too cold, a band to just cover ears has been enough.
     
  7. gman0482

    gman0482 Member

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    Great help everyone. I plan to ride for as long as it's at least 50*F, and there's no salt/sand (and of course snow) on the ground. Once any or all of those hit, I most likely won't ride until march and stick to gym and trainer. Hopefully I still have a month or so left :rolleyes:.

    -Greg
     
  8. BigSharks

    BigSharks New Member

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    We're already seeing high 40's in the mornings here in NE Ohio.

    I go compression tights, mesh shorts, Under Armour shirt, and a pair of UA receiver gloves (football). They don't soak through easily when wet, are warm enough, but not bulky at all.

    I'm still trying to figure out headgear though. A knit cap is too warm, no hat will be too cold in a few weeks.
     
  9. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW. When riding at temps below 40ºF, I wear XC ski stuff + neoprene booties + goggles ...

    A polypropylene balaclava is a good idea for keeping your ears & neck warm ... they come in various fabric "weights" -- lightweight to 'expedition'.
     
  10. 64Paramount

    64Paramount Active Member

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    The right headgear for cool/cold weather was always the hardest for me to figure out too.
     
  11. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    I have a nice WP/B cap from hind that fits easily under my helmet. I've also got a thin poly pro knit cap that fits equally well. Each works as well as the other, and both are good in the 20's (Yup, it gets that cold in Tucson.).

    Neoprene booties are the trick for shoe/feet.

    Upper body stays comfy most times with thin capilene shirt under a short sleeve jersey under a windproof (on the front)long sleeve jersey. Almost as good are armwarmers, thin undershirt and ss jersey under the same windproof jersey. Sometimes I revert to heavier long sleeved jerseys under the windproof.

    That about covers most situations.

    If you're warm when you start, you've got too much on.
     
  12. 64Paramount

    64Paramount Active Member

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    I think that's where I screw up....
     
  13. gman0482

    gman0482 Member

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    I know that the right amount of clothes on should have you chilly for the 1st 15 minutes or so, but my biggest problem is after a sprint or a good hill I will sweat, and then freeze. But I don't have anything wind resistant yet (that will also vent out). Today's ride was around 55*F, I had : regular long sleeve shirt, short sleeve jersey, long sleeve jersey. Long Canari tights, Pearl Izumi shorts.
     
  14. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Layering is essential. Don't dress in one or two bulky layers. If you feel bulky when you're dressed, you likely are. I find long zippers essential, too. Go up and down on the zippers as needed.

    No matter what you have on, you'll still sweat on hard efforts. Buying bits of clothing made of hydrophobic materials will help. Bi-component fabrics are even better. They have a hydrophobic component next to the next skin, while the outside is made from a hydrophilic component. In this way water moves to the outisde of the fabric, away from the skin.

    With three thin layers, at most, on, I've never suffered in the cold, even down to 22°F.
     
  15. gman0482

    gman0482 Member

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    That is great, thanks. I was thinking about not even going out again this season after today's ride, just because I was sweating on the pushes, staying on my brakes on every downhill so I wouldn't go over 20 mph and freeze to death. It's the worst feeling ever. I am going to a couple LBS tomorrow to look for those you mentioned.
     
  16. Beverly Stayart

    Beverly Stayart New Member

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    Wear multiple layers of thin material. Don't wear anything bulky or heavy.
     
  17. gman0482

    gman0482 Member

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  18. wsommariva

    wsommariva New Member

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    First time for me riding in the winter. My only concern is keeping my face from freezing. From reading these posts doesn't seem to be a problem? Worst situation I expect to encounter is 20 degrees F and riding downhills at 27 mph. Thinking about a ski mask. Any thoughts appreciated.
     
  19. b725

    b725 New Member

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    I'm definitely interested to read these posts. Early morning (late-October) rides in Maine have become very cold (starting at 27 - 32 degrees). Now, I layer as a skier might - on top - Helly Hansen base top layer (with turtle neck), light fleece vest, full-zip wind-resistent (reflective) jacket. On bottom, if really cold - helly hansen breathable long underwear - otherwise, leg warmers for 30 plus degree days + bike shorts. A Descente "cold-out" skull cap that covers ears (the best!). Light ski socks and Descente booties.
     
  20. wsommariva

    wsommariva New Member

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    " A old man lived in Maine all his life. His property was surveyed one day and he was told that it's actually in NH. Thnak God he said, I can't stand those Maine winters any longer."

    So, no problem with frozen faces it seems. I'll need to get a skull cap and them I'm all set.

    Thanks
     
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