Winter commute

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by John Griffiths, Jul 20, 2005.

  1. John_Kane

    John_Kane Guest

    John Griffiths wrote:
    > Hi folks,
    > Sorry to throw a downer on the lovely cycling weather we've been having
    > recently but....
    > I've recently starting commting to work by bike and I've enjoyed the
    > experience so much (numpty white van drivers aside) I want to carry on.
    > However, the thought of doing it in the winter is a bit daunting. Anyone
    > have any advice for essential kit that will make it a bit more safe and
    > comfortable?
    > Cheers
    > John


    Well this may be a bit extreme for the UK but it's fun:
    http://icebike.com/ or you might want to have a look at Pete Hickey's
    page on winter commuting http://mudhead.uottawa.ca/~pete/winter.txt

    BTW, Pete's article does pretty accurately describe winter cycling
    where he lives. I used to live 3-4 km from him and rode part of the
    same route in Ottawa ON and Hull QC though I don't always agree with
    his suggestions.

    John Kane
    Kingston ON Canada
     


  2. John_Kane

    John_Kane Guest

    wafflycat wrote:
    > "John Griffiths" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > >
    > > I'm in work by about 8 and leave about 4/5, so in the winter pretty much
    > > the whole journey will be in darkness.
    > > John
    > >

    >
    > If you are on unlit roads, lots of good lighting is essential, both to see
    > where you are going and to be seen by. I have two of the big 5LED Cateye
    > front lights (on handle bars via Minoura space bar) which give a good beam
    > so I can see where I'm going, with a S-Sun 3 LED mounted on inner fork to
    > light the edge of road clearly, a small flashing LED as emergency 'be seen'
    > only and a helmet-mounted LED torch too.... On the back I have three rear
    > red LEDs & a red LED on the rear of my helmet.. Then I wear acres of
    > reflectives and the bike has reflectives on it too. I use the LEDs for the
    > runtime and brightness. My son, who has a winter commute along dark country
    > lanes has similar set up and from watching him I can tell this is a very
    > visible set-up from the point of view of a driver. There's been the odd
    > occasion he's been late, so I've set out in car to check he's okay and I've
    > found I can see him well in advance of reaching him :) I recommend a
    > helmet-mounted front light as that really seems to have a "What the f**k is
    > that?" effect on motorists who seem to give me an extra-wide berth and dip
    > their headlights sooner and more often than without helmet-mounted light.
    >
    > Cheers, helen s


    Any you don't need a parade permit? :)

    John Kane
    Kingston ON
     
  3. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Wed, 20 Jul 2005 20:01:41 +0100 someone who may be "Just zis Guy,
    you know?" <[email protected]> wrote this:-

    >A Russian army
    >surplus hat is reportedly an excellent combination ear warmer and
    >keep-rain-out-of-eyes device.


    Traditional Russian fleece hats are designed for cold weather. They
    tend to be far too warm for cycling any distance in the UK, where
    the weather is seldom cold. They are good for walking though.


    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number F566DA0E
    I will always explain revoked keys, unless the UK government
    prevents me by using the RIP Act 2000.
     
  4. Martin Dann

    Martin Dann Guest

    In message <[email protected]>
    "John Griffiths" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hi folks,
    > Sorry to throw a downer on the lovely cycling weather we've been having
    > recently but....
    > I've recently starting commting to work by bike and I've enjoyed the
    > experience so much (numpty white van drivers aside) I want to carry on.
    > However, the thought of doing it in the winter is a bit daunting. Anyone
    > have any advice for essential kit that will make it a bit more safe and
    > comfortable?


    Including wot they said.

    Spare inner tubes. It is no fun mending a pucture by the side of the road.
    It is less fun when it is 0C and raining.

    Martin.

    --
    According to the human genome project, humans are 50-60% bananas.
    When emailing me, please include the word Banana in the subject line.
     
  5. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

  6. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "wafflycat" <waffles*A*T*v21net*D*O*T*co*D*O*T*uk> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > If you are on unlit roads, lots of good lighting is essential, both to see
    > where you are going and to be seen by. I have two of the big 5LED Cateye
    > front lights (on handle bars via Minoura space bar) which give a good beam
    > so I can see where I'm going, with a S-Sun 3 LED mounted on inner fork to
    > light the edge of road clearly, a small flashing LED as emergency 'be

    seen'
    > only and a helmet-mounted LED torch too.... On the back I have three rear
    > red LEDs & a red LED on the rear of my helmet.. Then I wear acres of
    > reflectives and the bike has reflectives on it too. I use the LEDs for the
    > runtime and brightness. My son, who has a winter commute along dark

    country
    > lanes has similar set up and from watching him I can tell this is a very
    > visible set-up from the point of view of a driver. There's been the odd
    > occasion he's been late, so I've set out in car to check he's okay and

    I've
    > found I can see him well in advance of reaching him :) I recommend a
    > helmet-mounted front light as that really seems to have a "What the f**k

    is
    > that?" effect on motorists who seem to give me an extra-wide berth and dip
    > their headlights sooner and more often than without helmet-mounted light.


    And i thought that bright red light in the east was called the sunrise!!
     
  7. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "John_Kane" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    >
    > Any you don't need a parade permit? :)
    >
    > John Kane
    > Kingston ON
    >


    At least I am highly visible in the dark! :)

    Cheers, helen s
     
  8. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    John Griffiths wrote:
    > "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > David Martin wrote:
    > >
    > >> Well there is winter and there is Winter. Where are you based? Do you
    > >> normally get snow/ice or just cold mucky rain?
    > >>
    > >> What is your commute like? Road/off-road/long/short etc.

    > >
    > > And can you reasonably expect to be in the dark in one or both directions,
    > > and if so for how long?

    >
    > I'm in work by about 8 and leave about 4/5, so in the winter pretty much the
    > whole journey will be in darkness.


    I used to be in West London..

    My recommendations:

    Long sleeve 'training top' with suitable wind proof fabric.
    Full finger gloves eg. altura winter ones.
    Buff.
    If you wear a helmet, a thin balaclava as used by motorcyclists to go
    under the helmet, or a fleece head band to cover the ears.
    If you don't wear a helmet then something like a Lowe mountain cap with
    ear covering flappy bits.
    Lightweight waterproof for the wet days, ie Altura Nevis or Nevis Lite.
    Shoe covers are a really good idea for the wet (and for the really
    cold.)
    Ron Hill bikesters or Altura winter cruiser leggings for the cool/cold
    days.

    And a pair of clear specs to keep the rain/cold off the eyes.

    Lights:
    Get a couple of LED lights and take spare batteries (for the rear). For
    the front almost anything will do as it is to be seen by rather than to
    see by, just make sure it is visible and you have spare batteries
    (easiest is if you have the same batteries as the rear). Rechargeables
    are a good idea for everyday use, just get into the habit of recharging
    every night.

    ...d
     
  9. arellcat

    arellcat Guest

    Roos wrote:

    > When it's icy/slushy/snowy I rather cycle than drive - I know I can't
    > control my car well enough in those conditions while I know I can handle
    > my bike. And I don't want to be a plonker myself :)


    When it's icy/slushy/snowy, there's no way I'd attempt to drive to work or
    appointments - because everyone else in Edinburgh tries to do exactly that,
    and the entire road network becomes jammed. So for me it's knobbly tyres on
    the mtb and "so long, suckers!" Of course, falling off would be negated if
    I rode the trike, but when the roads are jammed and the snow is a foot-deep
    drift along the middle of the road, it's almost impossible. Of course, my
    car has a Torsen diff tucked away in its gearbox, but I've yet to try its
    effectiveness in snow.

    For me, winter gear isn't all that different from my autumn gear. The
    mainstays would be my now approximately waterproof Goretex jacket over a
    couple of Odlo or Helly Hansen tops, Duofold fleece gloves (or lobster claw
    gloves if it's really really cold), Endura tights over Endura heavyweight
    lycra shorts, and usually I'll just wear my Sonoma SPD shoes rather than
    Goretex hiking boots and flat pedals. If it's pouring with rain, I might
    also put my feet into plastic bags, then put my shoes on. Lenses might be
    either clear or blue iridium, depending on the light.

    On the bike it's full mudguards plus my usual winter combination of
    something like a Panaracer Dart front tyre and some medium chunky
    Specialized tyre on the back. I use my 5W Nightstick system up front for
    penetrating the interminable darkness, and just the usual 5-LED light on the
    back, plus bits of reflective tape around the place.

    Becky
     
  10. Judith

    Judith Guest

    On Wed, 20 Jul 2005 17:16:25 +0100, Simon Brooke
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> Ickle scarf type thing to stop the wind going down the front of my
    >> neck.

    >
    >It is impossible to sufficiently praise buffs.


    I wore mine this morning, under my h*lm*t, to keep the wind out of my
    ears. Excellent bit of kit.

    Judith
     
  11. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "Judith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Wed, 20 Jul 2005 17:16:25 +0100, Simon Brooke
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>> Ickle scarf type thing to stop the wind going down the front of my
    >>> neck.

    >>
    >>It is impossible to sufficiently praise buffs.

    >
    > I wore mine this morning, under my h*lm*t, to keep the wind out of my
    > ears. Excellent bit of kit.
    >
    > Judith


    In colder weather I wear mine round neck but pulled up over my mouth, and
    ears - keeps my ears warm and stops me breathing in too-cold air and then it
    stops any cold air whistling in down any gaps between cycle jersey/jacket &
    skin of neck.

    Cheers, helen s
     
Loading...
Loading...