Winter training program

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by oneradtec, Aug 9, 2003.

  1. oneradtec

    oneradtec New Member

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    Hello. I'm currently getting myself into solid racing condition..and should peak for the Michelin Classic in South carolina in mid October. This will be the last race of the year. I got a late start this year...but am having fun training for the Michelin Classic..as well as a century on Sep. 1st. Anyway, I would like to carry some of this form into the spring of 2004..and have a great season next year. I'm looking for some winter training advice. What about cross training advice? I love to run as well and have planned to do some running as well. I have problems with cold weather riding..although we do get 55 degrees or better here in NC during the winter. I thought about cyclocross. I have a spare road bike. Can this bike convert to a cross bike? What would I have to do to make it cross ready? All suggestions would be appreciated. I want 2004 to be a big big year for me...so I am willing to work very hard over the winter.
     
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  2. WebTrainer

    WebTrainer New Member

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    Hello, Oneradtec. What you at least should do is a weighttraining programme during the winter period. It is in advange for 1 hr TT, expolsive intervals like sprints and injury prevention. A part of the recearch I have done is published in European Jounal Applied Physiology 2001 Nov;86(1):79-84

    The effects of replacing a portion of endurance training by explosive strength training on performance in trained cyclists.

    Bastiaans JJ, van Diemen AB, Veneberg T, Jeukendrup AE.
    ADMOTION, Den Haag, The Netherlands.

    To investigate the effects of replacing a portion of endurance training by strength training on exercise performance, 14 competitive cyclists were divided into an experimental (E; n = 6) and a control (C; n = 8) group. Both groups received a training program of 9 weeks. The total training volume for both groups was the same [E: 8.8 (1.1) h/week; C: 8.9 (1.7) h/week], but 37% of training for E consisted of explosive-type strength training, whilst C received endurance training only. Simulated time trial performance (TT), short-term performance (STP), maximal workload (Wmax) and gross (GE) and delta efficiency (DE) were measured before, after 4 weeks and at the end of the training program (9 weeks). No significant group-by-training effects for the markers of endurance performance (TT and Wmax) were found after 9 weeks, although after 4 weeks, these markers had only increased (P < 0.05) in E. STP decreased (P < 0.05) in C, whereas no changes were observed in E. For DE, a significant group-by-training interaction (P < 0.05) was found, and for GE the group-by-training interaction was not significant. It is concluded that replacing a portion of endurance training by explosive strength training prevents a decrease in STP without compromising gains in endurance performance of trained cyclists.

    The best to you,

    www.WebTrainer.nl
     
  3. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    Adrie,

    I'm just wondering how you come to such a conclusion (i.e., weight training increases 1-hr TT and injury prevention) when your research doesn't show this?

    Looking at a broad range of research, some of which was shown at http://www.cyclingnews.com/fitness/?id=strengthstern, there is little or no evidence to suggest that in trained cyclists, weight training (i'm assuming that that is what the explosive type strength training was) is beneficial to endurance performance (i.e., > ~ 75-secs).

    Ric
     
  4. WebTrainer

    WebTrainer New Member

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    Ric,

    When the measured values between the two groups are not significant different it does not mean that is not valuable for training. When you say that only significant differences are valuable you are right. But in performance practice I do the things which are most promising. Weight training is one of these. The most important thing is for sure the way you do your weight training programme and how to combine the weight training with the endurance training. That is a part of the "art" of a trainer.

    When two groups of riders do ITT with a different PF and the group with the higher PF perform on the average 3% better but the difference between the groups is not significant. In practice I advise to ride with a higher PF. What do you do?


    The best to you,

    www.webtrainer.nl
     
  5. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    Adrie,

    When you look at the research that has compared weight training and 40km TT performance (e.g., Bishop et al.) there's often a decrease in (endurance) performance.

    When you look at research that compares similar but different weight training movements, there's no carry over from one exercise to another -- the rule of specificity (e.g., e.g., Luecke, et al., 1998, Harris et al., 2000, Fagan and Doyle-Baker, 2000, Bishop et al., 1999, Rich and Cafarelli, 2000).

    As adaptations occur at specific joint and angle velocities, and cycling requires a much higher joint velocity than weight training, there will be no carry over. Forgive me if i've mistaken your paper for another, but wasn't your STP 30-sec cycle test carried out at a very low cadence (e.g., ~ 50 revs/min), which is generally lower than the cadence most people cycle at, but closer to the velocities encountered in weight training?

    As weight training increases contractile proteins, and decreases mitochondrion density, and capillary densiity, but endurance training increases these and are positively associated with endurance performance/40km TT (Coyle et al 91), I see it far better to do on the bike training to improve endurance cycling performance.

    I don't see weight training as promising, especially as other research runs counter to your suggestion.

    Ric


     
  6. Geonz

    Geonz New Member

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    Um.... while they're having their little debate... I don't race but I do ride in the winter. A little gear makes a lot of difference, though I think genes make more.
    I have an old cheap bike that I use a lot in winter. It weighs a ton (hmmm... weight training of a sort...) but boy can I get a workout and holey cow, the aluminum frame flies afterward! If you're riding hard, 55 is NOT COLD. One rule of thumb: once hyou're moving, yhou really do warm up. I've felt downright cold... for up to 7 minutes. Then, it's GONE. What cold?
    The old cheapo also doesn't have those funny metal things that you stick your feet on, so my tootsies don't get so cold (I don't lean on metal posts either).
    Try a few "cold" rides -- it might not be as bad as you think. (But then again, it might be. SOme of my buddies are sometimes turning blue beside me. They're not as well insulated as I am, either.)
    I'm cluess about cross ready. Maybe a post to "equipment" wold render advice there.
     
  7. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    Oneradtec,

    If it's so cold where you are over the winter that you don't ride your bike, then weight training and running will help you. In fact any exercise would. If, on the other hand you will be riding on a regular basis over the winter (either out on the road, indoors on a trainer and/or doing cyclo x), then other sports *won't* help you get fitter for cycling.

    That doesn't mean you shouldn't do them (running, weights, etc) -- some people might get enjoyment from these sports, and if you do, then do them. Just be aware that they won't help your cycling.

    During the winter, it's good to get in plenty of base volume at lower intensities, e.g., zones 1 and 2. However, there's no reason why you shouldn't do some higher intensity work too (zones 4 and 5).

    Schedule a break from the higher intensity work after you finish racing for a couple or more weeks and then pick the intensity up again, just completing small amounts of it weekly, so that your body remains accustomed to it, and you don't loose much fitness.

    A coach will be able to help you schedule a plan.

    Ric
     
  8. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    I'm a big fan of technique training over the winter and as people shift to winter bikes (that don't feel or act like road bikes) they loose some skill! Pick up on skills that you want to improve and complete a skills session each week, this is a fun way of increasing time on the bike. As most skills sessions include sprints, etc. there is a big training effect too.

    The winter is all about removing weaknesses, while the summer (season) is all about captialising on strengths!.
     
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