Winter's coming



I

Ian Smith

Guest
On Sun, 09 Oct, Not Responding <[email protected]> wrote:
> Peter Clinch wrote:
> >
> > A truly ideal setup for snow and ice isn't a bike, but a trike...

>
> Not so sure. The first thing that happens on British roads when the
> first 0.5mm of snow falls is instant and widespread gridlock. The
> ability to filter is essential if you want to actually get anywhere and
> I'm not convinced a trike can match a bike in this respect.


Well, then I switch to teh quiet route, which has the other advantage
that it's never ever gritted, so remains spectacularly good fun 'till
the ice melts naturally.

I do have to get off and claw my way up some of teh inclines, but it's
worth it.

regards, Ian SMith
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J

John Mallard

Guest
Simon Mason wrote:
>
> I remember that year - My mother let me *eat* the cream off the top
> of the milk with a spoon.


Oh yes, you've just reminded me. Finding the milk on the step with the foil
caps pushed up on a 2 inch pillar of frozen cream.

--
Cheerful Pedalling
John Mallard
 
W

wafflycat

Guest
"Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Not Responding wrote:
>
>> With the hub gears and brakes, my bike is pretty much the ideal set up
>> for winter. If there's ever /real/ snow, though, I might be persauded to
>> put some knobblier rubber on the wheels.

>
> A truly ideal setup for snow and ice isn't a bike, but a trike...
>


Indeed - as Nathan found out with much fun last winter, the trice is much
better for cycling to college & back on than a bike when the roads are icy.

Cheers, helen s
 
W

wafflycat

Guest
"Duncan Gray" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "John Mallard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>
>
>> Anyone else remember errrrmm, was it 1963/4? Cycling to school through
>> proper snow drifts. Passing a pile of snow cleared from a side road that
>> remained until easter, taking the tyres off old bikes and riding around
>> on
>> frozen lakes.

>
>
> I remember the drifts being much taller than me.
> We lived on a single track road with dykes along each side.
> It took my dad a week to break out to civilisation.
>


I can remember that as a small kid - great fun with the sledge on the back
field slopes!

Cheers, helen s
 
I

Ian Smith

Guest
On Sun, 9 Oct 2005 19:43:15 +0100, wafflycat <> wrote:
>
> I can remember that as a small kid - great fun with the sledge on the
> back field slopes!


This would be before the move to Norfolk, presumably...

regards, Ian SMith
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W

wafflycat

Guest
"Ian Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Sun, 9 Oct 2005 19:43:15 +0100, wafflycat <> wrote:
>>
>> I can remember that as a small kid - great fun with the sledge on the
>> back field slopes!

>
> This would be before the move to Norfolk, presumably...
>

It was, but even if it wasn't, there's a great slope between me and the next
village which would be great for sledging down...

Cheers, helen s
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
John Mallard wrote:
> Not Responding wrote:
>> The chatter on the weather groups and forums is all about the
>> possibility of us getting a proper, cold winter this year.
>>

>
> I'm long enough in the tooth to have noticed that EVERY YEAR we are told
> this.
> One day they'll be right and feel very pleased with themselves.
>
> Anyone else remember errrrmm, was it 1963/4? Cycling to school through
> proper snow drifts. Passing a pile of snow cleared from a side road that
> remained until easter, taking the tyres off old bikes and riding around on
> frozen lakes.
>


That was the year I caught chickenpox just as the snows started to fall
and wasn't allowed out again until they had gone. First time in my life
it had snowed where I lived and I missed playing in it.

--
Tony

"I did make a mistake once - I thought I'd made a mistake but I hadn't"
Anon
 
D

David Martin

Guest
Tony Raven wrote:
> John Mallard wrote:
> > Not Responding wrote:
> >> The chatter on the weather groups and forums is all about the
> >> possibility of us getting a proper, cold winter this year.
> >>

> >
> > I'm long enough in the tooth to have noticed that EVERY YEAR we are told
> > this.
> > One day they'll be right and feel very pleased with themselves.
> >
> > Anyone else remember errrrmm, was it 1963/4? Cycling to school through
> > proper snow drifts. Passing a pile of snow cleared from a side road that
> > remained until easter, taking the tyres off old bikes and riding around on
> > frozen lakes.
> >

>
> That was the year I caught chickenpox just as the snows started to fall
> and wasn't allowed out again until they had gone. First time in my life
> it had snowed where I lived and I missed playing in it.


Hmm.. shades of 'Winter Holiday' coming on..

...d
 
M

MartinM

Guest
The Denmead 200 this year was my only snowy ride this year, the novelty
wore off after trying to negotiate the first downhill on packed snow
(and crashing into a hedge on another)
 
N

Not Responding

Guest
MartinM wrote:
> The Denmead 200 this year was my only snowy ride this year, the novelty
> wore off after trying to negotiate the first downhill on packed snow
> (and crashing into a hedge on another)
>


What with Denmead being less than 20 miles from here, it was a bit
galling that the snow (as usual) failed to make it over the hill.
 
M

MartinM

Guest
Not Responding wrote:
> MartinM wrote:
> > The Denmead 200 this year was my only snowy ride this year, the novelty
> > wore off after trying to negotiate the first downhill on packed snow
> > (and crashing into a hedge on another)
> >

>
> What with Denmead being less than 20 miles from here, it was a bit
> galling that the snow (as usual) failed to make it over the hill.


It was only on the top out near Stocksbridge, but sufficiently scary.
There was another thread at about the same time when someone took a
picture of Brighton Seafront all white, I chose to go over Ditchling
Beacon that day, which was fine although we did get caught in a
blizzard elsewhere which is scary the first time on a road bike. But I
remember Solent urc'ers at the time saying they had had none.

Wait until the Atlantic Conveyor stops due to global warming and we
will apparently get Canada style winters every year, it could be within
20 years.
 
C

Colin Blackburn

Guest
Duncan Gray wrote:
> "John Mallard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>
>>Anyone else remember errrrmm, was it 1963/4? Cycling to school through
>>proper snow drifts. Passing a pile of snow cleared from a side road that
>>remained until easter, taking the tyres off old bikes and riding around on
>>frozen lakes.

>
>
> I remember the drifts being much taller than me.
> We lived on a single track road with dykes along each side.
> It took my dad a week to break out to civilisation.


That was just last February for us.

Colin
 
A

Ambrose Nankivell

Guest
John Mallard wrote:
> Not Responding wrote:
> > The chatter on the weather groups and forums is all about the
> > possibility of us getting a proper, cold winter this year.
> >

>
> I'm long enough in the tooth to have noticed that EVERY YEAR we are told
> this.
> One day they'll be right and feel very pleased with themselves.
>
> Anyone else remember errrrmm, was it 1963/4? Cycling to school through
> proper snow drifts. Passing a pile of snow cleared from a side road that
> remained until easter, taking the tyres off old bikes and riding around on
> frozen lakes.


<memory duration="long">
Well, it's not as if you don't get to ride o^Hin water when it's not
frozen. Spare a thought for the rest of us.
</memory>

A
 
I

ian henden

Guest
"Mark Thompson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>> The chatter on the weather groups and forums is all about the
>> possibility of us getting a proper, cold winter this year.

>
> Coldest since 1990-something said the met office a few weeks ago


Yup. definitely in for a cold one this year.

Heaters have stopped working on the buses....... ;O(