Wireless bike computers



Hi all,

my computer has died and I was considering getting a wireless
computer. I don't want to spend too much and I was thinking about the
Echowell Echo W2. It has all the functions I want and isn't too
expensive.

So how much of a problem is interference and drop-out with the
wireless models? Riding is usually a sole effort for me, so no need to
worry about "cross-talk." Pros, cons, all comments gratefully
received.

Thanks,

Peter
 
R

Rudi

Guest
I have been using an Echo W1 for about 3 years with no problems other than
one lot of flat batteries in the sender. I have never experienced any
interference or drop out. I think wireless is the way to go.
Regrds

<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]m...
> Hi all,
>
> my computer has died and I was considering getting a wireless
> computer. I don't want to spend too much and I was thinking about the
> Echowell Echo W2. It has all the functions I want and isn't too
> expensive.
>
> So how much of a problem is interference and drop-out with the
> wireless models? Riding is usually a sole effort for me, so no need to
> worry about "cross-talk." Pros, cons, all comments gratefully
> received.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Peter
 
V

verb

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]m...
> Hi all,
>
> my computer has died and I was considering getting a wireless
> computer. I don't want to spend too much and I was thinking about the
> Echowell Echo W2. It has all the functions I want and isn't too
> expensive.
>
> So how much of a problem is interference and drop-out with the
> wireless models? Riding is usually a sole effort for me, so no need to
> worry about "cross-talk." Pros, cons, all comments gratefully
> received.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Peter


what' s wrong with wires??

wireless has the benefit of being more expensive.
 
V

verb

Guest
"verb" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]m...
>> Hi all,
>>
>> my computer has died and I was considering getting a wireless
>> computer. I don't want to spend too much and I was thinking about the
>> Echowell Echo W2. It has all the functions I want and isn't too
>> expensive.
>>
>> So how much of a problem is interference and drop-out with the
>> wireless models? Riding is usually a sole effort for me, so no need to
>> worry about "cross-talk." Pros, cons, all comments gratefully
>> received.
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Peter

>
> what' s wrong with wires??
>
> wireless has the benefit of being more expensive.
>
>


and more unreliable(crossed signals)
 
T

TimC

Guest
On 2008-05-08, [email protected] (aka Bruce)
was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
> Hi all,
>
> my computer has died and I was considering getting a wireless
> computer. I don't want to spend too much and I was thinking about the
> Echowell Echo W2. It has all the functions I want and isn't too
> expensive.
>
> So how much of a problem is interference and drop-out with the
> wireless models? Riding is usually a sole effort for me, so no need to
> worry about "cross-talk." Pros, cons, all comments gratefully
> received.


What's the point of wireless? I doangeddit.

Pros:

· Clean lines?

Cons:

· But you don't notice the "lines" anyway, because you could just wrap
the cable around your front brake cable.

· You have to turn your computer on in the morning, otherwise it
doesn't record anything. You can't just start rolling, and the reed
switch causes the computer to turn itself on, because if it was
running the receiver permanently, it would drain the battery more.

· Extra batteries. Twice the chance of failure in any given ride.
Except more, because transmitters aren't exactly light weight on
batteries.

· There's a transmitter involved, and usually some metal in the
sightline. Constantly, they're as unreliable as buggery.

· And for the roadies, they weigh an extra 0.3 nanograms over the
cabled version.

In summary. Why?

--
TimC
HANDLE WITH EXTREME CARE: This Product Contains Minute Electrically
Charged Particles Moving at Velocities in Excess of Five Hundred
Million Miles Per Hour. --unknown
 
Z

zog

Guest
TimC wrote:
> On 2008-05-08, [email protected] (aka Bruce)
> was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
>> Hi all,
>>
>> my computer has died and I was considering getting a wireless
>> computer. I don't want to spend too much and I was thinking about the
>> Echowell Echo W2. It has all the functions I want and isn't too
>> expensive.
>>
>> So how much of a problem is interference and drop-out with the
>> wireless models? Riding is usually a sole effort for me, so no need to
>> worry about "cross-talk." Pros, cons, all comments gratefully
>> received.

>
> What's the point of wireless? I doangeddit.
>
> Pros:
>
> · Clean lines?
>
> Cons:
>
> · But you don't notice the "lines" anyway, because you could just wrap
> the cable around your front brake cable.
>
> · You have to turn your computer on in the morning, otherwise it
> doesn't record anything. You can't just start rolling, and the reed
> switch causes the computer to turn itself on, because if it was
> running the receiver permanently, it would drain the battery more.
>
> · Extra batteries. Twice the chance of failure in any given ride.
> Except more, because transmitters aren't exactly light weight on
> batteries.
>
> · There's a transmitter involved, and usually some metal in the
> sightline. Constantly, they're as unreliable as buggery.
>
> · And for the roadies, they weigh an extra 0.3 nanograms over the
> cabled version.
>
> In summary. Why?
>


well I will never use wires again, I have been using a Cayeye wireless
for 3 years, no problems, the units are water resistant, both the sender
and display use the same sized lithium battery and are easy to get and
no great hassle to change once a year I suppose, but I haven't changed
mine yet :)

the micro wireless on this page
http://www.cateye.com/en/product_listing/51

after having to route the bloody wires around the front suspension on
the mountain bike, having the same wires ripped out more than once by
branches sticking out on the single track, no thanks
 
Z

zog

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> my computer has died and I was considering getting a wireless
> computer. I don't want to spend too much and I was thinking about the
> Echowell Echo W2. It has all the functions I want and isn't too
> expensive.
>
> So how much of a problem is interference and drop-out with the
> wireless models? Riding is usually a sole effort for me, so no need to
> worry about "cross-talk." Pros, cons, all comments gratefully
> received.


have a look at the cateye range, I use the micro wireless CC-MC100W
http://www.cateye.com/en/product_listing/51

very simple to fit, reliable, batteries are easy to buy and change,
water resistant, clear display, buy them from fleabay for about the
$60-70 range

mine has worked great without problems for the last 3 years, cannot
comment on crosstalk if it has them since I only ride with one other guy
or by myself generally.
 
T

thefathippy

Guest
On May 8, 11:17 am, TimC <[email protected]
astro.swin.edu.au> wrote:
> On 2008-05-08, [email protected] (aka Bruce)
> was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
>
> > Hi all,

>
> > my computer has died and I was considering getting a wireless
> > computer. I don't want to spend too much and I was thinking about the
> > Echowell Echo W2. It has all the functions I want and isn't too
> > expensive.

>
> > So how much of a problem is interference and drop-out with the
> > wireless models? Riding is usually a sole effort for me, so no need to
> > worry about "cross-talk." Pros, cons, all comments gratefully
> > received.

>
> What's the point of wireless? I doangeddit.
>
> Pros:
>
> · Clean lines?
>
> Cons:
>
> · But you don't notice the "lines" anyway, because you could just wrap
> the cable around your front brake cable.
>
> · You have to turn your computer on in the morning, otherwise it
> doesn't record anything. You can't just start rolling, and the reed
> switch causes the computer to turn itself on, because if it was
> running the receiver permanently, it would drain the battery more.
>
> · Extra batteries. Twice the chance of failure in any given ride.
> Except more, because transmitters aren't exactly light weight on
> batteries.
>
> · There's a transmitter involved, and usually some metal in the
> sightline. Constantly, they're as unreliable as buggery.
>
> · And for the roadies, they weigh an extra 0.3 nanograms over the
> cabled version.
>
> In summary. Why?


They're cool?

Seriously, for mtbs, they're brilliant. No wires to get ripped off by
stray foliage.

Except my Aldi one sucked big time. I was doing 99 kmh regularly (max
reading), managing incredible speed uphills, and covered some
incredible distances - even when I wasn't moving. Strangely, my wife's
Aldi wireless computer works perfectly - luckily for me!

Tony F
 
V

verb

Guest
"thefathippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]m...
On May 8, 11:17 am, TimC <[email protected]
astro.swin.edu.au> wrote:
> On 2008-05-08, [email protected] (aka Bruce)
> was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
>
> > Hi all,

>
> > my computer has died and I was considering getting a wireless
> > computer. I don't want to spend too much and I was thinking about the
> > Echowell Echo W2. It has all the functions I want and isn't too
> > expensive.

>
> > So how much of a problem is interference and drop-out with the
> > wireless models? Riding is usually a sole effort for me, so no need to
> > worry about "cross-talk." Pros, cons, all comments gratefully
> > received.

>
> What's the point of wireless? I doangeddit.
>
> Pros:
>
> · Clean lines?
>
> Cons:
>
> · But you don't notice the "lines" anyway, because you could just wrap
> the cable around your front brake cable.
>
> · You have to turn your computer on in the morning, otherwise it
> doesn't record anything. You can't just start rolling, and the reed
> switch causes the computer to turn itself on, because if it was
> running the receiver permanently, it would drain the battery more.
>
> · Extra batteries. Twice the chance of failure in any given ride.
> Except more, because transmitters aren't exactly light weight on
> batteries.
>
> · There's a transmitter involved, and usually some metal in the
> sightline. Constantly, they're as unreliable as buggery.
>
> · And for the roadies, they weigh an extra 0.3 nanograms over the
> cabled version.
>
> In summary. Why?


They're cool?

Seriously, for mtbs, they're brilliant. No wires to get ripped off by
stray foliage.

Except my Aldi one sucked big time. I was doing 99 kmh regularly (max
reading), managing incredible speed uphills, and covered some
incredible distances - even when I wasn't moving. Strangely, my wife's
Aldi wireless computer works perfectly - luckily for me!

Tony F


99kmph uphill?

********!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
T

thefathippy

Guest
On May 8, 12:45 pm, "verb" <[email protected]> wrote:
> "thefathippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>
> news:[email protected]m...
> On May 8, 11:17 am, TimC <[email protected]
>
>
>
> astro.swin.edu.au> wrote:
> > On 2008-05-08, [email protected] (aka Bruce)
> > was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:

>
> > > Hi all,

>
> > > my computer has died and I was considering getting a wireless
> > > computer. I don't want to spend too much and I was thinking about the
> > > Echowell Echo W2. It has all the functions I want and isn't too
> > > expensive.

>
> > > So how much of a problem is interference and drop-out with the
> > > wireless models? Riding is usually a sole effort for me, so no need to
> > > worry about "cross-talk." Pros, cons, all comments gratefully
> > > received.

>
> > What's the point of wireless? I doangeddit.

>
> > Pros:

>
> > · Clean lines?

>
> > Cons:

>
> > · But you don't notice the "lines" anyway, because you could just wrap
> > the cable around your front brake cable.

>
> > · You have to turn your computer on in the morning, otherwise it
> > doesn't record anything. You can't just start rolling, and the reed
> > switch causes the computer to turn itself on, because if it was
> > running the receiver permanently, it would drain the battery more.

>
> > · Extra batteries. Twice the chance of failure in any given ride.
> > Except more, because transmitters aren't exactly light weight on
> > batteries.

>
> > · There's a transmitter involved, and usually some metal in the
> > sightline. Constantly, they're as unreliable as buggery.

>
> > · And for the roadies, they weigh an extra 0.3 nanograms over the
> > cabled version.

>
> > In summary. Why?

>
> They're cool?
>
> Seriously, for mtbs, they're brilliant. No wires to get ripped off by
> stray foliage.
>
> Except my Aldi one sucked big time. I was doing 99 kmh regularly (max
> reading), managing incredible speed uphills, and covered some
> incredible distances - even when I wasn't moving. Strangely, my wife's
> Aldi wireless computer works perfectly - luckily for me!
>
> Tony F
>
> 99kmph uphill?
>
> ********!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


ummm... errr... well, derrr.

That was my point when I wrote "I was doing 99 kmh regularly (max
reading), managing incredible speed uphills, and covered some
incredible distances - even when I wasn't moving." My Aldi computer
suck-diddly-uck-sucked!

Tony F
 
V

verb

Guest
"thefathippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
On May 8, 12:45 pm, "verb" <[email protected]> wrote:
> "thefathippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>
> news:[email protected]m...
> On May 8, 11:17 am, TimC <[email protected]
>
>
>
> astro.swin.edu.au> wrote:
> > On 2008-05-08, [email protected] (aka Bruce)
> > was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:

>
> > > Hi all,

>
> > > my computer has died and I was considering getting a wireless
> > > computer. I don't want to spend too much and I was thinking about the
> > > Echowell Echo W2. It has all the functions I want and isn't too
> > > expensive.

>
> > > So how much of a problem is interference and drop-out with the
> > > wireless models? Riding is usually a sole effort for me, so no need to
> > > worry about "cross-talk." Pros, cons, all comments gratefully
> > > received.

>
> > What's the point of wireless? I doangeddit.

>
> > Pros:

>
> > · Clean lines?

>
> > Cons:

>
> > · But you don't notice the "lines" anyway, because you could just wrap
> > the cable around your front brake cable.

>
> > · You have to turn your computer on in the morning, otherwise it
> > doesn't record anything. You can't just start rolling, and the reed
> > switch causes the computer to turn itself on, because if it was
> > running the receiver permanently, it would drain the battery more.

>
> > · Extra batteries. Twice the chance of failure in any given ride.
> > Except more, because transmitters aren't exactly light weight on
> > batteries.

>
> > · There's a transmitter involved, and usually some metal in the
> > sightline. Constantly, they're as unreliable as buggery.

>
> > · And for the roadies, they weigh an extra 0.3 nanograms over the
> > cabled version.

>
> > In summary. Why?

>
> They're cool?
>
> Seriously, for mtbs, they're brilliant. No wires to get ripped off by
> stray foliage.
>
> Except my Aldi one sucked big time. I was doing 99 kmh regularly (max
> reading), managing incredible speed uphills, and covered some
> incredible distances - even when I wasn't moving. Strangely, my wife's
> Aldi wireless computer works perfectly - luckily for me!
>
> Tony F
>
> 99kmph uphill?
>
> ********!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


ummm... errr... well, derrr.

That was my point when I wrote "I was doing 99 kmh regularly (max
reading), managing incredible speed uphills, and covered some
incredible distances - even when I wasn't moving." My Aldi computer
suck-diddly-uck-sucked!

Tony F


- errr sorry , im retarded :-/
 
H

hemyd

Guest
"thefathippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]m...
On May 8, 11:17 am, TimC <[email protected]
astro.swin.edu.au> wrote:
> On 2008-05-08, [email protected] (aka Bruce)
> was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
>
> > Hi all,

>
> > my computer has died and I was considering getting a wireless
> > computer. I don't want to spend too much and I was thinking about the
> > Echowell Echo W2. It has all the functions I want and isn't too
> > expensive.

>
> > So how much of a problem is interference and drop-out with the
> > wireless models? Riding is usually a sole effort for me, so no need to
> > worry about "cross-talk." Pros, cons, all comments gratefully
> > received.

>
> What's the point of wireless? I doangeddit.
>
> Pros:
>
> 7 Clean lines?
>
> Cons:
>
> 7 But you don't notice the "lines" anyway, because you could just wrap
> the cable around your front brake cable.
>
> 7 You have to turn your computer on in the morning, otherwise it
> doesn't record anything. You can't just start rolling, and the reed
> switch causes the computer to turn itself on, because if it was
> running the receiver permanently, it would drain the battery more.
>
> 7 Extra batteries. Twice the chance of failure in any given ride.
> Except more, because transmitters aren't exactly light weight on
> batteries.
>
> 7 There's a transmitter involved, and usually some metal in the
> sightline. Constantly, they're as unreliable as buggery.
>
> 7 And for the roadies, they weigh an extra 0.3 nanograms over the
> cabled version.
>
> In summary. Why?


They're cool?

Seriously, for mtbs, they're brilliant. No wires to get ripped off by
stray foliage.

Except my Aldi one sucked big time. I was doing 99 kmh regularly (max
reading), managing incredible speed uphills, and covered some
incredible distances - even when I wasn't moving. Strangely, my wife's
Aldi wireless computer works perfectly - luckily for me!

Tony F

Ha! I'm glad you mentioned the Aldi. Mine did the 99kph bit, and random
speed readings in between - all even when standing still. I communicated
with the suppliers, a place in Switzerland (yes! Not in China!). A
distinguished gentleman (at least I pictured him that way) informed me that
the meter can pick up interference from many sources. On further
investigation I found that the random speeds were being generated by a
blinking LED front light. I moved the light and the meter away from each
other, and that fixed the fault - or so I thought. unfortunately there was
still the odd burst of random speed here and there, with the odometer
advancing in time. Basically the unit can pick interference from a variety
of sources.

I haven't returned the meter. I'm using the speedo in conjunction,
currently, with the temperature meter. I've yet to see if the temperature
meter is picking up any readings from a nearby stove.... or volcano
somehwre in the world.....

Henry.
 
J

John Tserkezis

Guest
TimC wrote:

> In summary. Why?


Marketing says so.

Cabled is "old" and "bad". Wireless is "new" and "good".
--
Linux Registered User # 302622
<http://counter.li.org>
 
On May 8, 8:06 pm, John Tserkezis
<[email protected]> wrote:
> TimC wrote:
> > In summary. Why?

>
> Marketing says so.
>
> Cabled is "old" and "bad". Wireless is "new" and "good".
> --
> Linux Registered User # 302622
> <http://counter.li.org>


Oh come on, you're such a luddite, next you'll be going back from
gears to fixed ... oh ... but fixed is better!
.... and I am saving up for a wireless puter for my fixie, to clean up
the lines.

Donga
 
K

Ken & Stace

Guest
Ive had one for a year now. The only problem I've had is if it is in ON mode
when you take the bike on a train, the speedo imediately goes to 99kmh and
stays that way for the whole train trip (even if the train stops at
stations) with a large number of kms being registered on the odometer.

Ken

<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]m...
> Hi all,
>
> my computer has died and I was considering getting a wireless
> computer. I don't want to spend too much and I was thinking about the
> Echowell Echo W2. It has all the functions I want and isn't too
> expensive.
>
> So how much of a problem is interference and drop-out with the
> wireless models? Riding is usually a sole effort for me, so no need to
> worry about "cross-talk." Pros, cons, all comments gratefully
> received.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Peter
 
T

terryc

Guest
On Thu, 08 May 2008 13:04:37 +0000, Ken & Stace wrote:

> Ive had one for a year now. The only problem I've had is if it is in ON mode
> when you take the bike on a train, the speedo imediately goes to 99kmh and
> stays that way for the whole train trip (even if the train stops at
> stations) with a large number of kms being registered on the odometer.


Would you mind less if the train was really going that fast?
 
J

John Henderson

Guest
Ken & Stace wrote:

> Ive had one for a year now. The only problem I've had is if it
> is in ON mode when you take the bike on a train, the speedo
> imediately goes to 99kmh and stays that way for the whole
> train trip (even if the train stops at stations) with a large
> number of kms being registered on the odometer.


Is 99 km/h just a maximum reading for your unit?

On at least one ride, my wired VDO C10 registered a maximum of
369.0 km/h. Given a wheel size setting of 2050 mm, that means
switching at exactly 50 Hz mains frequency.

John
 
T

thefathippy

Guest
On May 8, 2:30 pm, "verb" <[email protected]> wrote:
> "thefathippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>
> news:[email protected]...
> On May 8, 12:45 pm, "verb" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>
> > "thefathippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message

>
> >news:[email protected]m...
> > On May 8, 11:17 am, TimC <[email protected]

>
> > astro.swin.edu.au> wrote:
> > > On 2008-05-08, [email protected] (aka Bruce)
> > > was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:

>
> > > > Hi all,

>
> > > > my computer has died and I was considering getting a wireless
> > > > computer. I don't want to spend too much and I was thinking about the
> > > > Echowell Echo W2. It has all the functions I want and isn't too
> > > > expensive.

>
> > > > So how much of a problem is interference and drop-out with the
> > > > wireless models? Riding is usually a sole effort for me, so no need to
> > > > worry about "cross-talk." Pros, cons, all comments gratefully
> > > > received.

>
> > > What's the point of wireless? I doangeddit.

>
> > > Pros:

>
> > > · Clean lines?

>
> > > Cons:

>
> > > · But you don't notice the "lines" anyway, because you could just wrap
> > > the cable around your front brake cable.

>
> > > · You have to turn your computer on in the morning, otherwise it
> > > doesn't record anything. You can't just start rolling, and the reed
> > > switch causes the computer to turn itself on, because if it was
> > > running the receiver permanently, it would drain the battery more.

>
> > > · Extra batteries. Twice the chance of failure in any given ride.
> > > Except more, because transmitters aren't exactly light weight on
> > > batteries.

>
> > > · There's a transmitter involved, and usually some metal in the
> > > sightline. Constantly, they're as unreliable as buggery.

>
> > > · And for the roadies, they weigh an extra 0.3 nanograms over the
> > > cabled version.

>
> > > In summary. Why?

>
> > They're cool?

>
> > Seriously, for mtbs, they're brilliant. No wires to get ripped off by
> > stray foliage.

>
> > Except my Aldi one sucked big time. I was doing 99 kmh regularly (max
> > reading), managing incredible speed uphills, and covered some
> > incredible distances - even when I wasn't moving. Strangely, my wife's
> > Aldi wireless computer works perfectly - luckily for me!

>
> > Tony F

>
> > 99kmph uphill?

>
> > ********!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

>
> ummm... errr... well, derrr.
>
> That was my point when I wrote "I was doing 99 kmh regularly (max
> reading), managing incredible speed uphills, and covered some
> incredible distances - even when I wasn't moving." My Aldi computer
> suck-diddly-uck-sucked!
>
> Tony F
>
> - errr sorry , im retarded :-/


hehe, no wuckas. I have my own set of socks that say "ignore me, I'm
an idiot". ;^)

Tony F
 
T

thefathippy

Guest
On May 8, 5:12 pm, "hemyd" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> Ha! I'm glad you mentioned the Aldi. Mine did the 99kph bit, and random
> speed readings in between - all even when standing still. I communicated
> with the suppliers, a place in Switzerland (yes! Not in China!). A
> distinguished gentleman (at least I pictured him that way) informed me that
> the meter can pick up interference from many sources. On further
> investigation I found that the random speeds were being generated by a
> blinking LED front light. I moved the light and the meter away from each
> other, and that fixed the fault - or so I thought. unfortunately there was
> still the odd burst of random speed here and there, with the odometer
> advancing in time. Basically the unit can pick interference from a variety
> of sources.
>
> I haven't returned the meter. I'm using the speedo in conjunction,
> currently, with the temperature meter. I've yet to see if the temperature
> meter is picking up any readings from a nearby stove.... or volcano
> somehwre in the world.....
>

Hmmm... Sunspots perhaps, or magnetic resonations, or my heartbeat, or
that stove or volcano you mention. Maybe funny smells, or cicadas
drumming.

I was about to say that I've been out in the bush, well away from
civilisation, and still had 99 kmh speeds shown, despite being well
away from any potential interference, when I remembered my phone. I
guess that *could* be the cause of the problems - I never tested it by
riding without my phone (stored in my backpack). Bah. I'll either
spend more money for a decent wireless system, or weight until Aldi
has their wired computers on sale again - that one only failed due to
my own stupidity - I pulled out the wires removing it from the bike. I
did appreciate their temperature and individually resettable max speed
functions.

Tony F
 
R

Rex

Guest
picked up one from Aldi for $15 recently. Does the job well!


<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]m...
> Hi all,
>
> my computer has died and I was considering getting a wireless
> computer. I don't want to spend too much and I was thinking about the
> Echowell Echo W2. It has all the functions I want and isn't too
> expensive.
>
> So how much of a problem is interference and drop-out with the
> wireless models? Riding is usually a sole effort for me, so no need to
> worry about "cross-talk." Pros, cons, all comments gratefully
> received.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Peter
 

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