Wireless Cycle Computers- are they as reliable as the "wired" type??

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Dawes, Jun 22, 2006.

  1. Dawes

    Dawes New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2006
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi.

    I've no experience at all with cycle computers but want to buy one ASAP so maybe you guys can help me out here.........I phoned my local cycle shop and was told to go with "wired" rather than "wireless"......he told me that the "wired" computers are more reliable.... so i'm undecided what to go for as yet.

    Do the "wired" computers seem to be more reliable in you guy's experiences??

    Many Thanks.
     
    Tags:


  2. schmuzzy

    schmuzzy New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2005
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    0
    ive a cat eye wireless that is bullet proof.

    however, i bought one of those mavic wireless that has the pick up in the skewer handle... and it works about 30% of the time.

    completely worthless. hopefully its a fluke and a replacement will be better.
     
  3. Dawes

    Dawes New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2006
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi Schmuzzy.

    Thanks for your reply........can i ask you which Cateye you have?...and is it heavy on batteries?
     
  4. Eastway82

    Eastway82 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    345
    Likes Received:
    0
    From experience (loads of Sigma wired and wireless,currently Polar CS200 CAD wireless), I'd say wired is a LOT more reliable than wireless, there's less to go wrong, less outlay on batteries (some wireless units eat them), and a really nicely wired in speed unit is a lot less obtrusive than most wireless units, as well as a lot lighter. The exception comes when you have a wired cadence sensor – I've yet to see a really neat way of running the wire.
     
  5. DiabloScott

    DiabloScott New Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2003
    Messages:
    2,284
    Likes Received:
    2
    Wireless Flight Deck - no reliability problems at all. doesn't interfere with my heart rate monitor or anybody else's computer either. I've got all internally run cables on my bike, don't want any wires uglifying it.

    Battery in the head unit lasts about as long as any of the wired units I have - battery in the transmitter lasts about 18 months.
     
  6. billallbritten

    billallbritten New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    What he said, no problems whatsoever.

    Bill
     
  7. marengo

    marengo New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2006
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi,

    I've CC-MC100W Micro CatEye wireless computer. Working fine for me
    :)

    Nat
     
  8. flipper

    flipper New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2003
    Messages:
    952
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've had a Cateye Cordless 7 and a Cateye Micro Wireless both die on me.
    It was the sensor in both cases and Cateye sent out new ones when I emailed them about it. (apparently it's a known problem with their sensors)
    I use a Sigma BC1606L (wired) now as I've lost a bit of faith in my wireless ones.
     
  9. Eastway82

    Eastway82 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    345
    Likes Received:
    0
    If all I wanted was speed/distance, I'd take a wired one every time.
     
  10. Wurm

    Wurm New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2004
    Messages:
    2,203
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have the same model, and it has functioned well. No interference from power lines or cars, and no intermittent transmission - it just keeps running like it's a wired model.

    Goes through a battery for the sensor unit (CR2025) and the head unit (CR2032) about once a year, but of course that depends on how much you use it/how many miles you ride. Batteries are only $3.29 each at the grocery store - no biggie.

    The original sensor unit did quit on me, but that was because the magnet was mounted too close and smacked the sensor pretty hard on a ride, before I had a chance to move it. Got another sensor from a friend and it's been working fine.
     
  11. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Messages:
    983
    Likes Received:
    0
    My first Wireless (about 4 years ago) was a Sigma Sports BC500. The unit needed a batery, the mount kit needed a battery and the sensor needed two. It was constanly running out of juice and it failed to work once the temps dropped below 30 deg F. I switched to wired until last year I picked up a Polar 725. It does give you the occassional phantom readings like 68 mph or HR of 235 bpm, but overall it's a great unit. I think Wireless technology is catching up.
     
Loading...
Loading...