Wisdom request: Front fork

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Mrbubl, Jan 27, 2004.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Mrbubl

    Mrbubl Guest

    I have a Specialized FSR XC Comp with a Manitou FF that has been modifed to it's stiffest available
    configuration (air-elastomer) and it is still too weenie.

    What would be a good (read economical) replacement for decent performance that doesn't bottom out. I
    am a big guy too 6'1" 250lbs

    advice??
     
    Tags:


  2. Fred Hinkson

    Fred Hinkson Guest

    Take some pounds off, maybe up to 30. So start riding more and eating less Or you could get a new
    fork so maybe you would ride more. Let me see, you go with a Minute 1 2 or 3.

    MTB Ride hard die free.
     
  3. S O R N I

    S O R N I Guest

    mrbubl wrote:
    > I have a Specialized FSR XC Comp with a Manitou FF that has been modifed to it's stiffest
    > available configuration (air-elastomer) and it is still too weenie.
    >
    > What would be a good (read economical) replacement for decent performance that doesn't bottom out.
    > I am a big guy too 6'1" 250lbs
    >
    > advice??

    Closeout Marzocchi Marathon S from any of the discount outlets.

    Bill "or a beefier model even" S.
     
  4. Dave Adnum

    Dave Adnum Guest

    "S o r n i" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > mrbubl wrote:
    > > I have a Specialized FSR XC Comp with a Manitou FF that has been modifed to it's stiffest
    > > available configuration (air-elastomer) and it is still too weenie.
    > >
    > > What would be a good (read economical) replacement for decent performance that doesn't bottom
    > > out. I am a big guy too 6'1" 250lbs
    > >
    > > advice??
    >
    > Closeout Marzocchi Marathon S from any of the discount outlets.
    >
    > Bill "or a beefier model even" S.
    >
    >

    id have to say go for a 2001 manitou magnum R ... has damping control (helps with the weight) and is
    cheap... if you want full air... go for a white bros. AT4 a very burly air fork.

    dave
     
  5. Di

    Di Guest

    "Fred Hinkson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Take some pounds off, maybe up to 30. So start riding more and eating less Or you
    > could get a new fork so maybe you would ride more. Let me see, you go with a Minute 1
    > 2 or 3.
    >
    > MTB Ride hard die free.

    Why do you assume he's fat, there's a lot of men who are 6-1 and very muscular that could weigh
    close to 250. BTW, I'm not one of them, I not quite 250 but could loose 15 or 20 lbs.
     
  6. Selwonk

    Selwonk Guest

    "di" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Fred Hinkson" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > 3211.bay.webtv.net...
    > > Take some pounds off, maybe up to 30. So start riding more and eating less Or you
    > > could get a new fork so maybe you would ride more. Let me see, you go with a Minute
    > > 1 2 or 3.
    > >
    > > MTB Ride hard die free.
    >
    > Why do you assume he's fat, there's a lot of men who are 6-1 and very muscular that could weigh
    > close to 250. BTW, I'm not one of them, I not quite 250 but could loose 15 or 20 lbs.
    >
    I'm not fat I'm just extremely muscular. It used to be "big boned"!
     
  7. Westie

    Westie Guest

    Selwonk wrote: <snip>
    > I'm not fat I'm just extremely muscular. It used to be "big boned"!

    I'm not fat either. It's all 'resting' muscle.
    --
    Westie (Replace 'invalid' with 'yahoo' when replying.)
     
  8. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    mrbubl wrote:
    > I have a Specialized FSR XC Comp with a Manitou FF that has been modifed to it's stiffest
    > available configuration (air-elastomer) and it is still too weenie.
    >
    > What would be a good (read economical) replacement for decent performance that doesn't bottom out.
    > I am a big guy too 6'1" 250lbs
    >
    > advice??

    Someone of your size, only one will do, IMHO... Z1 Look for a previous model year closeout for
    cheap, but you'll still need to replace the stock springs with heavier ones.
    --
    Slacker
     
  9. Twohat

    Twohat Guest

    Westie wrote:
    > Selwonk wrote: <snip>
    >> I'm not fat I'm just extremely muscular. It used to be "big boned"!
    >
    > I'm not fat either. It's all 'resting' muscle.

    I'm 6'1" too, and I consider myself "big-boned", and about a stone overweight, but I only weigh
    200lbs! Where could you put the extra half hundredweight? I wouldn't like to carry half a bag of
    cement everywhere I went! Like the man said, eat less and pedal further!

    Having said that, I am happy with my (now very old) Manitou Magnum forks - they don't bottom out
    even on the softest setting (Maybe I just don't go fast enough, though . . .)

    Twohat - because two heads are better than one.
     
  10. Pete Jones

    Pete Jones Guest

    On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 21:39:13 -0000, "Twohat" <[email protected]>
    blathered:

    >>> I'm not fat I'm just extremely muscular. It used to be "big boned"!
    >>
    >> I'm not fat either. It's all 'resting' muscle.
    >
    >I'm 6'1" too, and I consider myself "big-boned", and about a stone overweight, but I only weigh
    >200lbs! Where could you put the extra half hundredweight?

    maybe they're 'retaining water'......or 'retaining pies', more likely...

    Pete
    ----
    http://www.btinternet.com/~peteajones/
     
  11. Jonesy

    Jonesy Guest

    "mrbubl" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have a Specialized FSR XC Comp with a Manitou FF that has been modifed to it's stiffest
    > available configuration (air-elastomer) and it is still too weenie.
    >
    > What would be a good (read economical) replacement for decent performance that doesn't bottom out.
    > I am a big guy too 6'1" 250lbs
    >
    > advice??

    Marzocchi. Buy the most robust one you can afford. Travel-matched to your rear suspension.
    --
    Jonesy
     
  12. Erik Brooks

    Erik Brooks Guest

    "mrbubl" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have a Specialized FSR XC Comp with a Manitou FF that has been modifed to it's stiffest
    > available configuration (air-elastomer) and it is still too weenie.
    >
    > What would be a good (read economical) replacement for decent performance that doesn't bottom out.
    > I am a big guy too 6'1" 250lbs
    >
    > advice??

    I'm a road biker, so this advice is probably worth little, but I wonder if adjustments to
    stem length and seat position would move your weight backwards on the bike and offload the
    front somewhat.

    Erik Brooks
     
  13. > > I have a Specialized FSR XC Comp with a Manitou FF that has been modifed to it's stiffest
    > > available configuration (air-elastomer) and it is still too weenie.
    > >
    > > What would be a good (read economical) replacement for decent performance that doesn't bottom
    > > out. I am a big guy too 6'1" 250lbs
    > >
    > > advice??

    Marzocchi MXC or MX Comp with the x-heavy spring set should do it. Is your back shock holding
    up alright?
    --
    _________________________
    Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
  14. Klydesdale

    Klydesdale Guest

    "Chris Phillipo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > > I have a Specialized FSR XC Comp with a Manitou FF that has been
    modifed to
    > > > it's stiffest available configuration (air-elastomer) and it is still
    too
    > > > weenie.
    > > >
    > > > What would be a good (read economical) replacement for decent
    performance
    > > > that doesn't bottom out. I am a big guy too 6'1" 250lbs
    > > >
    > > > advice??
    >
    > Marzocchi MXC or MX Comp with the x-heavy spring set should do it. Is your back shock holding up
    > alright?
    > --
    > _________________________

    Hmm... I'm 250lbs and, as opposed to my experiences with my other Marzocchi forks (a 99 Z2
    Alloy, a 99 Z2 Atom Bomb and a 99 Z1 alloy - all equipped with the stiffest springs available
    for them), my experience with Marzocchi MX Comp forks has been that the x-heavy springs are too
    heavy for my tastes.

    When I built up my custom Curtlo steel hardtail last summer, I ordered a MX Comp from Doug Curtiss
    (the framebuilder) because he said he could get me one with x-heavy springs already installed in it
    at a great OEM price ($185) direct from Marzocchi. But it looked like there was going to be a delay
    in getting this fork until after the frame was ready because Marzocchi USA was out of stock on
    2003's and waiting for 2004's. Since I had an MTB event coming up in which I wanted to use the new
    bike, I bought a 2003 MX Comp from my favorite LBS because they were able to get me one in a couple
    of days through Quality Bicycle Products at a price that beat a lot of mail order places ($216 US).
    At the advice of the LBS owner, I held off on ordering heavier springs for it until I saw how the
    stock springs performed for me. To my surprise, the stock springs actually felt pretty damn good.
    There was none of the mushiness, excessive bottoming out and brake dive that I experienced with my
    other Marzocchi forks when I rode them with stock springs.

    When I did receive the MX Comp from Curtlo, the first thing I did was swap the heavier springs into
    the fork that was on the bike. I was suprised to find out how much harsher it felt with the heavier
    springs. A major difference in the 2004 fork is that is uses an air preload mechanism opposed to the
    mechanical screw type pre-load adjuster on the 2003 model. One of the advantages of the air-preload
    set-up is that it gives you a means to adjust the overall spring rate without having to actually
    swap coil springs. Since the preload mechanism is dictated entirely by the top cap assembly and
    these parts are easy to swap between my two forks, I've been easily able to play around with
    different springs and preload setups with both forks on the same bike . The setup I ended up with is
    the stock springs from the 2003 in the 2004 fork with the air pre-load. For most of my riding I use
    no added pressure in the pre-load. The only time I may add air pressure is when I know the ride is
    going to be a long one on relatively smooth stuff.

    Based on this experience I'd recommend heavier guys just buy a stock 2004 MX Comp and see how it
    works out before getting heavier springs - especially if you have to pay extra for them. All you
    may need is a bit of pressure in the pre-load to give you extra spring stiffness when you need
    or want it.
     
  15. Gman

    Gman Guest

    On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 10:06:11 -0500, KLydesdale <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Hmm... I'm 250lbs and, as opposed to my experiences with my other Marzocchi forks (a 99 Z2
    > Alloy, a 99 Z2 Atom Bomb and a 99 Z1 alloy - all equipped with the stiffest springs available
    > for them), my experience with Marzocchi MX Comp forks has been that the x-heavy springs are too
    > heavy for my tastes.
    >
    > When I built up my custom Curtlo steel hardtail last summer, I ordered a MX Comp from Doug Curtiss
    > (the framebuilder) because he said he could get me one with x-heavy springs already installed in
    > it at a great OEM price ($185) direct from Marzocchi. But it looked like there was going to be a
    > delay in getting this fork until after the frame was ready because Marzocchi USA was out of stock
    > on 2003's and waiting for 2004's. Since I had an MTB event coming up in which I wanted to use the
    > new bike, I bought a 2003 MX Comp from my favorite LBS because they were able to get me one in a
    > couple of days through Quality Bicycle Products at a price that beat a lot of mail order places
    > ($216 US). At the advice of the LBS owner, I held off on ordering heavier springs for it until I
    > saw how the stock springs performed for me. To my surprise, the stock springs actually felt pretty
    > damn good. There was none of the mushiness, excessive bottoming out and brake dive that I
    > experienced with my other Marzocchi forks when I rode them with stock springs.
    >
    > When I did receive the MX Comp from Curtlo, the first thing I did was swap the heavier springs
    > into the fork that was on the bike. I was suprised to find out how much harsher it felt with the
    > heavier springs. A major difference in the 2004 fork is that is uses an air preload mechanism
    > opposed to the mechanical screw type pre-load adjuster on the 2003 model. One of the advantages of
    > the air-preload set-up is that it gives you a means to adjust the overall spring rate without
    > having to actually swap coil springs. Since the preload mechanism is dictated entirely by the top
    > cap assembly and these parts are easy to swap between my two forks, I've been easily able to play
    > around with different springs and preload setups with both forks on the same bike . The setup I
    > ended up with is the stock springs from the 2003 in the 2004 fork with the air pre-load. For most
    > of my riding I use no added pressure in the pre-load. The only time I may add air pressure is when
    > I know the ride is going to be a long one on relatively smooth stuff.
    >
    > Based on this experience I'd recommend heavier guys just buy a stock 2004 MX Comp and see how it
    > works out before getting heavier springs - especially if you have to pay extra for them. All you
    > may need is a bit of pressure in the pre-load to give you extra spring stiffness when you need or
    > want it.
    >

    I must've missed this post earlier...glad to hear tho! I plan to buy the 2004 MX Comp and I'm about
    220lbs. I ride pretty hard, and I've heard that this fork rides stiff. I'm glad to hear you confirm.
    No need to swap the springs. Those are some great prices tho...Everyplace I check it's $299, but
    seems to be well worth that.

    Can't wait to try it out...3-4" of snow on the ground now tho. Tomorrow I'll be riding, but it will
    be on a K2 Fat Bob snowboard.

    Still can't talk the local hill into allowing winterXbikes...I'll keep on 'em tho.

    Gman
     
  16. Klydesdale

    Klydesdale Guest

    "Gman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sat, 31 Jan 2004 10:06:11 -0500, KLydesdale <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    > > Hmm... I'm 250lbs and, as opposed to my experiences with my other Marzocchi forks (a 99 Z2
    > > Alloy, a 99 Z2 Atom Bomb and a 99 Z1 alloy -
    all
    > > equipped with the stiffest springs available for them), my experience
    with
    > > Marzocchi MX Comp forks has been that the x-heavy springs are too heavy
    for
    > > my tastes.
    > >
    > > When I built up my custom Curtlo steel hardtail last summer, I ordered
    a MX
    > > Comp from Doug Curtiss (the framebuilder) because he said he could get
    me
    > > one with x-heavy springs already installed in it at a great OEM price
    ($185)
    > > direct from Marzocchi. But it looked like there was going to be a delay
    in
    > > getting this fork until after the frame was ready because Marzocchi USA
    was
    > > out of stock on 2003's and waiting for 2004's. Since I had an MTB
    event
    > > coming up in which I wanted to use the new bike, I bought a 2003 MX
    Comp
    > > from my favorite LBS because they were able to get me one in a couple of days through Quality
    > > Bicycle Products at a price that beat a lot of mail order places ($216 US). At the advice of the
    > > LBS owner, I held off
    on
    > > ordering heavier springs for it until I saw how the stock springs
    performed
    > > for me. To my surprise, the stock springs actually felt pretty damn
    good.
    > > There was none of the mushiness, excessive bottoming out and brake dive
    that
    > > I experienced with my other Marzocchi forks when I rode them with stock springs.
    > >
    > > When I did receive the MX Comp from Curtlo, the first thing I did was
    swap
    > > the heavier springs into the fork that was on the bike. I was suprised
    to
    > > find out how much harsher it felt with the heavier springs. A major difference in the 2004 fork
    > > is that is uses an air preload mechanism
    opposed
    > > to the mechanical screw type pre-load adjuster on the 2003 model. One
    of
    > > the advantages of the air-preload set-up is that it gives you a means to adjust the overall
    > > spring rate without having to actually swap coil
    springs.
    > > Since the preload mechanism is dictated entirely by the top cap assembly
    and
    > > these parts are easy to swap between my two forks, I've been easily
    able to
    > > play around with different springs and preload setups with both forks on
    the
    > > same bike . The setup I ended up with is the stock springs from the
    2003 in
    > > the 2004 fork with the air pre-load. For most of my riding I use no
    added
    > > pressure in the pre-load. The only time I may add air pressure is when
    I
    > > know the ride is going to be a long one on relatively smooth stuff.
    > >
    > > Based on this experience I'd recommend heavier guys just buy a stock
    2004
    > > MX Comp and see how it works out before getting heavier springs -
    especially
    > > if you have to pay extra for them. All you may need is a bit of
    pressure
    > > in the pre-load to give you extra spring stiffness when you need or want
    it.
    > >
    >
    > I must've missed this post earlier...glad to hear tho! I plan to buy the 2004 MX Comp and I'm
    > about 220lbs. I ride pretty hard, and I've heard that this fork rides stiff. I'm glad to hear you
    > confirm. No need to swap the springs. Those are some great prices tho...Everyplace I check it's
    > $299, but seems to be well worth that.
    >

    Yeah those were good prices - that's why I ended up with two of them.

    Here's a link to 2004 MX Comp forks from a place called Alfred E. Bike that has some pretty good
    prices on them. http://aebike.com/site/page.cfm?PageID=30&SKU=FK8107
     
  17. Gman

    Gman Guest

    On Sat, 7 Feb 2004 16:21:42 -0500, KLydesdale <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Yeah those were good prices - that's why I ended up with two of them.
    >
    > Here's a link to 2004 MX Comp forks from a place called Alfred E. Bike that has some pretty good
    > prices on them. http://aebike.com/site/page.cfm?PageID=30&SKU=FK8107
    >
    >

    Hey those AE Bike prices are very good...and from the 5 minutes of research I did, they seem to be
    pretty reputable...thx for the link!

    G
     
  18. Klydesdale

    Klydesdale Guest

    "Gman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sat, 7 Feb 2004 16:21:42 -0500, KLydesdale <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    > >
    > > Yeah those were good prices - that's why I ended up with two of them.
    > >
    > > Here's a link to 2004 MX Comp forks from a place called Alfred E. Bike
    that
    > > has some pretty good prices on them. http://aebike.com/site/page.cfm?PageID=30&SKU=FK8107
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Hey those AE Bike prices are very good...and from the 5 minutes of research I did, they seem to be
    > pretty reputable...thx for the link!
    >

    AE Bike is a LBS in Kalamazoo, MI and according to people I know from the Michigan Mountain Biking
    Association, they are indeed a reputable place. Their website parts catalog is an online version of
    the Quality Bicycle Products catalog. I've come across several website that do this (Harris Cyclery
    for instance) but AE bike definitely seems to have the best prices. In my experience they keep it
    fairly up-to-date with what's in stock at QBP. I often use the AE Bike catalog to look stuff up that
    I want my favorite LBS to order for me and if it's not listed in the AE bike catalog, my LBS usually
    can't get it for me from QBP either. The only real downside is that you may wait a few more days for
    your order because they don't keep the stuff in stock but rather order it from QBP when you order
    from them.

    .
     
  19. Tcmedara

    Tcmedara Guest

    KLydesdale <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > AE Bike is a LBS in Kalamazoo, MI and according to people I know from the Michigan Mountain Biking
    > Association, they are indeed a reputable place. Their website parts catalog is an online version
    > of the Quality Bicycle Products catalog. I've come across several website that do this (Harris
    > Cyclery for instance) but AE bike definitely seems to have the best prices. In my experience they
    > keep it fairly up-to-date with what's in stock at QBP. I often use the AE Bike catalog to look
    > stuff up that I want my favorite LBS to order for me and if it's not listed in the AE bike
    > catalog, my LBS usually can't get it for me from QBP either. The only real downside is that you
    > may wait a few more days for your order because they don't keep the stuff in stock but rather
    > order it from QBP when you order from them.
    >
    >

    I ordered some fork upgrade parts from these guys. Great communication, great prices, fast
    processing. I'd do it again. Granted, that's only a sample size of one, but they'll be one of the
    first places I check from now on.

    Tom
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...