Wise words from a pro



grahamspringett

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Feb 26, 2004
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Saw this from Rory Sutherland on cyclingnews.com:

"I read something that disturbed me recently. Someone said, "The harder you train, the better you go." I do not agree with this statement. Everyone is different, and everyone needs different things. One needs to train smarter, not harder. We see this first hand as professionals in this sport. We observe our teammates and training partners. I hope this is not what is being taught to those kids trying to become professional athletes."

I guess we can all take something away from this, whether we're aspiring young elite riders or struggling masters with families.
 
grahamspringett said:
Saw this from Rory Sutherland on cyclingnews.com:

"I read something that disturbed me recently. Someone said, "The harder you train, the better you go." I do not agree with this statement. Everyone is different, and everyone needs different things. One needs to train smarter, not harder. We see this first hand as professionals in this sport. We observe our teammates and training partners. I hope this is not what is being taught to those kids trying to become professional athletes."

I guess we can all take something away from this, whether we're aspiring young elite riders or struggling masters with families.
What's "harder" anyways? Not to mention the definition of "better". :) I think he got it backwards. "The better you train, the harder you go" makes more sense.
 
Piotr said:
What's "harder" anyways? Not to mention the definition of "better". :) I think he got it backwards. "The better you train, the harder you go" makes more sense.
Thats his point!
most people think "The harder you train, the better you go":confused:

but really its "The better you train, the harder you go":)
or as he puts its "The smarter you train, the faster you go":)

If you trained grayhound dogs the way most people train they tend to die!:eek:
 
DJA said:
If you trained grayhound dogs the way most people train they tend to die!:eek:

But unlike people, greyhounds (and thoroughbreds) have been bred to achieve maximum speed over a fairly short duration, with limited consideration for the robustness of the final "design". A better comparison, then, might be sled dogs...but even that's not necessarily a good example to go by, because of species differences.
 
DJA said:
Thats his point!
most people think "The harder you train, the better you go":confused:

but really its "The better you train, the harder you go":)
or as he puts its "The smarter you train, the faster you go":)

If you trained grayhound dogs the way most people train they tend to die!:eek:
Hi

I think you guys are discussing semantics, i wouldn't rule out any of those phrases, as long as they motivate you for training

Regards
 
I thought that this was very good too. Bobby Julich writing about taking time off at the end of the season before starting up anew.
In those two weeks, I wouldn't even think about physical activity outside of playing with the kids and on the golf course. After those two weeks an internal sensor started to tell me that it was at least time to start doing something. I enjoy many sports and activities so that was never a hard decision, but deciding when to get back on the bike was always different. I left the bike bag by the car for a reason.

Of course, I would see my bike every day as I shuffled by it to get into the car, so it was a subliminal message not to forget about it. When I felt the need to unpack it, that was the first signal that it was time to at least start thinking about getting back into training, but rarely did I get on it right away. Now, it is out of the bike bag, cleaned, the wheels pumped up, and just staring at me, ready to go when I feel it is time. When I was finally able to get dressed, fill up my bottles, strap on my shoes without any second thoughts, that meant it was ready for the next season to begin.
That's exactly what I went through about 4-8 weeks ago. I was a bit crispy from the end of the season and needed time off badly. I did some other stuff in some time away (fixing up the house, etc.) then started to gradually work in some physical activity when I felt like I could handle it and when I wanted to. I knew that the time came when it felt right. It was interesting to read basically the same thing coming from him.


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