wobbly rear wheel?

Discussion in 'Clydesdales 200lb / 90kg + riders' started by clearlybored, Sep 17, 2011.

  1. clearlybored

    clearlybored New Member

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    Anyone else have this problem? I have a specialized sirrus that I purchased new 4 months ago and my rear wheel is now wobbly. I'm told that I need to tighten the spokes on the wheel and make sure its "true". ( This is all new to me, last time I rode a bike I was 12.) I'm gonna take into the bike shop today but I was wondering if this is normal for a new bike?
     
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  2. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    It's not unusual to have factory built wheels that are built with spoke tensions to low, with uneven tensions, or both. That will result in spokes loosening and going all "wobbly". The best solution is to to a bike shop and ask that they de-tension and then properly tension the spokes in your wheels.
     
  3. clearlybored

    clearlybored New Member

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    So i took my bike into my LBS and I ended up buying a new wheel. The guy first offered to replace my broken spokes and "true?" the original wheel but after some discussion I decided to buy a better wheel. Not knowing much about bikes I don't know why the new wheel is better but the mechanic at the LBS told me it was much stronger.
     
  4. sitzmark

    sitzmark Member

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    Maybe you were given an exchange price for the upgrade to the new wheel, but if not, I would suggest that you go ahead and have the original wheel re tensioned/trued to factory specifications. Even if a spoke is broken, as long as there are no signs of abnormal abuse the repair of a 4-month old wheel should be covered under warranty.

    Hopefully you're dealing with a reputable shop and now have a more durable, higher performing wheel. If a trade wasn't part of the upgrade, then no reason you shouldn't have a functional back-up wheel ... or at least one you can sell to offset the cost of the upgrade.
     
  5. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Well, there's no way to say why the shop wanted to sell you a new wheel. It could have been a way to make a sale. It certainly doesn't speak well of the shop that they didn't tell you more about why a new wheel would be so much better than the old wheel tensioned correctly.

    When you go to an LBS for purchase or repairs, you should ask a lot of questions just like you would a doctor, and then you should investigate their answers.
     
  6. Pat Stowe

    Pat Stowe New Member

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    Ya probably "done good"
     
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