Woo, new toys in the mail!

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Slash, Feb 24, 2003.

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  1. Slash

    Slash Guest

    I broke down and ordered a 2002 Marzocchi MXR from Pricepoint.com after much painful debate between
    it, a 2k3 MX Pro ETA and an '02 Marathon 100. I figure that if I find myself needing the fun
    features on either of the other two forks, I'll probably have a better frame to bolt it to when the
    time comes. As it is this MXR is probably overkill for my bike, but I've never been one to make
    sense in the past, so why start now?

    Also threw in some other upgrade goodies I'd been considering, and it seemed like the right time to
    do it. If I'm tearing things down to install a fork I'd might as well give it an overhaul. Pair of
    LX derailleurs, two pair of new cables and a new chain. Next on my list are the crankset and
    cassette, but they can wait a little longer. New brakes would be nice too, but to go disc would cost
    at least $200 (wheelset as well as disc setups). Again, probably something I'd be better getting as
    bolt-on with a new bike.

    Should probably upgrade the rider too.

    Anything super tricky on a fork installation? Or front/rear derailleurs for that matter? Quick
    checks on the net indicate I should be good to go if I pay attention, last resort I can have an
    actual LBS install it while I watch and say things like "oooooh, THAT'S where it goes..."

    -Slash
    --
    "Ebert Victorious"

    - The Onion
     
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  2. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Slash <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    Congrats on your new shiny bits!

    > Anything super tricky on a fork installation? Or front/rear derailleurs for that matter? Quick
    > checks on the net indicate I should be good to go if I pay attention, last resort I can have an
    > actual LBS install it while I watch and say things like "oooooh, THAT'S where it goes..."
    >
    > -Slash

    Well, you already have a headset in place, so that's sorted. Just be carefull to lay all headset
    parts down carefully in the order they came off (clean and re-grease 'em before putting back).

    The 'star fangled nut' thing (you know about this? The thing your headset bearing preload bolt
    screws to), right - there is likely not going to be on in your fork steerer tube, so you'll have
    to fit one. Use something like the rounded end of a broom handle (cut off a few inces that end of
    an old broom). Place the star nut the right way in the top of the fork steerer tube, put the
    round end of the stick on top, hit other end with hammer until nut is in at desired depth and
    level/not tilted.

    You will also need to cut your steerer to the right length. If your old forks had the bars on your
    bike at the right height, use that length to measure where to cut on the new ones. Remember, cut
    longer rather than shorter, cos you can't add metal back! Tae care making sure you've measured
    correctly here, or you'll likely top yourself for getting it wrong.

    Hacksaw will do the job, and you can use a hose clamp (jubilee clip) around the steerer to give you
    a cutting guide for a straighter cut.

    There's probably much clearer info on the Sheldon Brown site if you look for
    it.

    Shaun aRe
     
  3. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Slash <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 24 Feb 2003 11:37:20 -0000, "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> scribbled:
    >
    > >Well, you already have a headset in place, so that's sorted. Just be carefull to lay all headset
    > >parts down carefully in the order they came
    off
    > >(clean and re-grease 'em before putting back).
    > >
    > >The 'star fangled nut' thing (you know about this? The thing your headset bearing preload bolt
    > >screws to), right - there is likely not going to be
    on
    > >in your fork steerer tube, so you'll have to fit one. Use something like
    the
    > >rounded end of a broom handle (cut off a few inces that end of an old broom). Place the star nut
    > >the right way in the top of the fork steerer tube, put the round end of the stick on top, hit
    > >other end with hammer
    until
    > >nut is in at desired depth and level/not tilted.
    >
    > Gonna pick one up at the LBS, Pricepoint didn't have any that I could find.
    >
    > >You will also need to cut your steerer to the right length. If your old forks had the bars on
    > >your bike at the right height, use that length to measure where to cut on the new ones. Remember,
    > >cut longer rather than shorter, cos you can't add metal back! Tae care making sure you've
    measured
    > >correctly here, or you'll likely top yourself for getting it wrong.
    > >
    > >Hacksaw will do the job, and you can use a hose clamp (jubilee clip)
    around
    > >the steerer to give you a cutting guide for a straighter cut.
    > >
    > >There's probably much clearer info on the Sheldon Brown site if you look
    for
    > >it.
    > >
    > >Shaun aRe
    >
    > I'll give it a whack myself (perhaps literally) but, failing that, will take it in to REI (the
    > local store's bike crew seems to know their stuff, moreso than is perhaps usual for an REI) or an
    > esteemed LBS to have it finished up Proper. I figure I can feed the starving bicycle mechanics
    > once, but you'd better believe I'll be taking notes every second of the way!

    Cool - you should be good to go then. Didn't know how much or little you had down, and didn't want
    to *patronise you, so I didn't say too much.

    The MXR's seem a very capable fork - sure you'll enjoy using them.

    Shaun aRe - (didn't want to give away how little I know....).
     
  4. Slash

    Slash Guest

    On Mon, 24 Feb 2003 13:52:17 -0000, "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> scribbled:

    >> I'll give it a whack myself (perhaps literally) but, failing that, will take it in to REI (the
    >> local store's bike crew seems to know their stuff, moreso than is perhaps usual for an REI) or an
    >> esteemed LBS to have it finished up Proper. I figure I can feed the starving bicycle mechanics
    >> once, but you'd better believe I'll be taking notes every second of the way!
    >
    >Cool - you should be good to go then. Didn't know how much or little you had down, and didn't want
    >to *patronise you, so I didn't say too much.
    >
    >The MXR's seem a very capable fork - sure you'll enjoy using them.
    >
    >Shaun aRe - (didn't want to give away how little I know....).

    I'll certainly give it my best shot. :)

    I've never done anything beyond doing normal part maintenance (loosening, cleaning, adjusting, the
    like) but I'm fairly good at things mechanical, so we'll see how it goes. Plus I like to read up
    before I dive into things (three cheers for Sheldon Brown!) to make it easier to see where the line
    between "Uh oh..." and "Oh shit!" lies. That way I can tell when I've crossed it, and to call upon
    someone with *actual* (vs perceived) skill to set things straight again. :p

    I don't know too much yet in the grand scheme of things, but I figured the best way to learn is to
    dive straight in - innocent bystanders beware.

    If all goes well, I'll be bumbling around on a shiny new fork by wednesday evening. Yippee!

    -Slash
    --
    "Ebert Victorious"

    - The Onion
     
  5. Slash

    Slash Guest

    On Mon, 24 Feb 2003 11:37:20 -0000, "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> scribbled:

    >Well, you already have a headset in place, so that's sorted. Just be carefull to lay all headset
    >parts down carefully in the order they came off (clean and re-grease 'em before putting back).
    >
    >The 'star fangled nut' thing (you know about this? The thing your headset bearing preload bolt
    >screws to), right - there is likely not going to be on in your fork steerer tube, so you'll have
    >to fit one. Use something like the rounded end of a broom handle (cut off a few inces that end of
    >an old broom). Place the star nut the right way in the top of the fork steerer tube, put the
    >round end of the stick on top, hit other end with hammer until nut is in at desired depth and
    >level/not tilted.

    Gonna pick one up at the LBS, Pricepoint didn't have any that I could find.

    >You will also need to cut your steerer to the right length. If your old forks had the bars on your
    >bike at the right height, use that length to measure where to cut on the new ones. Remember, cut
    >longer rather than shorter, cos you can't add metal back! Tae care making sure you've measured
    >correctly here, or you'll likely top yourself for getting it wrong.
    >
    >Hacksaw will do the job, and you can use a hose clamp (jubilee clip) around the steerer to give you
    >a cutting guide for a straighter cut.
    >
    >There's probably much clearer info on the Sheldon Brown site if you look for
    >it.
    >
    >Shaun aRe

    I'll give it a whack myself (perhaps literally) but, failing that, will take it in to REI (the local
    store's bike crew seems to know their stuff, moreso than is perhaps usual for an REI) or an esteemed
    LBS to have it finished up Proper. I figure I can feed the starving bicycle mechanics once, but
    you'd better believe I'll be taking notes every second of the way!

    -Slash
    --
    "Ebert Victorious"

    - The Onion
     
  6. snip

    > >
    > >The 'star fangled nut' thing (you know about this? The thing your headset bearing preload bolt
    > >screws to), right - there is likely not going to be
    on
    > >in your fork steerer tube, so you'll have to fit one. Use something like
    the
    > >rounded end of a broom handle (cut off a few inces that end of an old broom). Place the star nut
    > >the right way in the top of the fork steerer tube, put the round end of the stick on top, hit
    > >other end with hammer
    until
    > >nut is in at desired depth and level/not tilted.
    >
    > Gonna pick one up at the LBS, Pricepoint didn't have any that I could find.

    snip
    >
    > -Slash
    > --
    > "Ebert Victorious"
    >
    > - The Onion

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/product.asp?number=22005

    check out Azonics "Head Lock" as an alternative to the star fangled nut. $$$ but ,,,,,,,

    DTW
     
  7. Ctg

    Ctg Guest

    "Slash" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    >
    > Anything super tricky on a fork installation? Or front/rear derailleurs for that matter? Quick
    > checks on the net indicate I should be good to go if I pay attention, last resort I can have an
    > actual LBS install it while I watch and say things like "oooooh, THAT'S where it goes..."
    >
    > -Slash

    Measure twice and cut once, cut long if you're not sure about the steer tube length. Star nuts can
    be tricky without a way to stabilize and center it in the steer tube. If you don't have access to a
    star nut tool you can probably improvise with other tools.

    I've used socket wrench bits that are just smaller than the tube diameter and cut a slit for a flat
    head screw driver in the screw. Use the screw to attach the wrench bit underneath the star nut, use
    another bit to hammer the nut in, unscrew the bottom bit and it falls through the fork, voila! But
    be sure to test that the bottom bit will pass through the steer tube, sometimes they taper at the
    crown. Trust me, I know from experience, you can get a bit stuck in the damn steer tube. A real tool
    would be much easier though...

    Chris
     
  8. Dennis Baker

    Dennis Baker Guest

    Slash <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Mon, 24 Feb 2003 13:52:17 -0000, "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> scribbled:
    >
    > >> I'll give it a whack myself (perhaps literally) but, failing that, will take it in to REI (the
    > >> local store's bike crew seems to know their stuff, moreso than is perhaps usual for an REI) or
    > >> an esteemed LBS to have it finished up Proper. I figure I can feed the starving bicycle
    > >> mechanics once, but you'd better believe I'll be taking notes every second of the way!
    > >
    > >Cool - you should be good to go then. Didn't know how much or little you had down, and didn't
    > >want to *patronise you, so I didn't say too much.
    > >
    > >The MXR's seem a very capable fork - sure you'll enjoy using them.
    > >
    > >Shaun aRe - (didn't want to give away how little I know....).
    >
    > I'll certainly give it my best shot. :)
    >
    > I've never done anything beyond doing normal part maintenance (loosening, cleaning, adjusting, the
    > like) but I'm fairly good at things mechanical, so we'll see how it goes. Plus I like to read up
    > before I dive into things (three cheers for Sheldon Brown!) to make it easier to see where the
    > line between "Uh oh..." and "Oh shit!" lies. That way I can tell when I've crossed it, and to call
    > upon someone with *actual* (vs perceived) skill to set things straight again. :p
    >
    > I don't know too much yet in the grand scheme of things, but I figured the best way to learn is to
    > dive straight in - innocent bystanders beware.
    >
    > If all goes well, I'll be bumbling around on a shiny new fork by wednesday evening. Yippee!
    >
    > -Slash

    I swapped out my forks when my frame cracked so I could have a decent front fork on my hard tail and
    it turned out to be a fairly simple deal. Like SR said, just keep track of which parts go where and
    clean them and grease them before putting them back in.

    I was so happy that I was able to successfully move the fork that when my frame came back from
    warrantee I decided to build the bike up myself rather than take it to the shop. It took me a few
    hours but in the end I had completely rebuilt my bike from a bare frame and a box of parts I was
    really impressed with myself (I figure someone has to be).

    If you have any mechanical ability at all the fork swap should be easy.

    -- The Ogre http://ogrehut.com
     
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