Woohoo!

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by NYC XYZ, Apr 23, 2006.

  1. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    Well, I took the SWB out for a twelve-mile spin...I was riding on the
    Grand Concourse in the Bronx, then went over the Tri-Boro into Astoria
    Park...and I have these further observations, for those who may be --
    in the future -- looking into a recumbent for urban riding:

    1) Cars are so much more respectful! Of course, this was Sunday, but
    the Grand Concourse is still, as its name suggests, a major
    thoroughfare. Even the bus drivers were extremely respectful! But
    being the former NYC messenger that I am, I was never in any danger --
    though it was very nice for a change not to get cut off or honked at.
    Amazing!!! Everybody kept their distance, slowed down even though it
    cost them the light, etc.

    2) I don't need no rear-view mirror! I could turn my head just about
    as easily and nearly as much as I always do on an upright! 'Matter of
    fact, I was zipping along as fast as I ever did on my upright! Or,
    rather, I should say, with as much effort as I typically do, which
    brings me to my next observation...

    3) I'm 5 mph slower!!!!! At least!!!!!!!! The amount of pedalling I
    did would have been a good ~27mph, but the most I was able to manage
    was a measly ~21!!! I hope this is just a matter of not having had the
    right gears (due to the chain issue mentioned in another post, which,
    unfortunately, seems unresolved) and 'bent muscles still
    developing...which brings me to my next point...

    4) I'm really feeling it! Not sore the next day, thankfully, but wow,
    'benting is like them leg exercise machines in the gym! I really
    worked my glutes, my quads (mainly above the knees), and hamstrings.

    5) Also, this reminds me of kayaking! Yes! Insofar as you've got to
    keep the shoulders relaxed to make it work...with kayaking, you'd think
    that it was about hacking away at the water with your manly arms on the
    paddle, but it ain't, it's about relaxing the upper body enough to
    coordinate its movement with the rest of the torso in order to paddle
    efficiently! Likewise, at least on an SWB like the HP Velo SMGTe,
    you'd think it was about maintaining firm control of the handlebars --
    but it ain't! It's about relaxing your shoulders, arms, everything,
    really...cool!

    6) The headrest is a nice addition to the already very comfy BodyLink
    hardshell seat. Actually, you'll definitely need the Airflow Cushion,
    which costs $$$. Actually, every damned thing on this machine costs $$
    -- can you believe the little two-inch computer mount is US$16??? But
    it's a very fine ride..."magic carpet," as RCN said a couple of times.
    I don't know how any other SWB maker stays in bid'ness!

    7) It's fun going over bumps and potholes with the fully-suspended
    SMGTe! At least with my Swiss Air DT air shock...though it seems to be
    bottoming-out more than it should, so I'll need to adjust it. It's fun
    going over speed bumps and jumping a few inches off the ground!
    Hmm...maybe I should get a seat belt? Or a parachute!

    8) Which segues again into this other note: the much lower vantage
    point seem to make spotting potholes slightly harder! A couple of
    times I'd been sort of surprised by a pothole that materialized as the
    lay of the land suddenly came into sight. But this is not a major
    issue, and now I can enjoy girls' plump pear posteriors without craning
    my neck!

    9) Speaking of whom...wow, this is more eye-catching than a car! You
    know how females enjoy novelty...and the girls in Astoria Park were
    really intrigued! I actually started getting shy...then wondered if
    all they were interested in was my 'bent! But I did some chin-ups and
    pull-ups to distract them...hehe....


    WOOHOO!!!!
     
    Tags:


  2. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "NYC XYZ" <[email protected]> writes:

    > 1) Cars are so much more respectful! Of course, this was Sunday, but
    > the Grand Concourse is still, as its name suggests, a major
    > thoroughfare.


    Heh :) If yer gonna commute, don't get suckered by the diff between
    Sunday, and Monday morning's rush hour.

    Anyways, here's to yez:
    http://www.metrolyrics.com/lyrics/70795/Easybeats/Friday_On_My_Mind

    > WOOHOO!!!!


    You kin say that again.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  3. NYC XYZ wrote:
    > Well, I took the SWB out for a twelve-mile spin...I was riding on the
    > Grand Concourse in the Bronx, then went over the Tri-Boro into Astoria
    > Park...and I have these further observations, for those who may be --
    > in the future -- looking into a recumbent for urban riding:
    >
    > 1) Cars are so much more respectful! Of course, this was Sunday, but
    > the Grand Concourse is still, as its name suggests, a major
    > thoroughfare. Even the bus drivers were extremely respectful! But
    > being the former NYC messenger that I am, I was never in any danger --
    > though it was very nice for a change not to get cut off or honked at.
    > Amazing!!! Everybody kept their distance, slowed down even though it
    > cost them the light, etc.
    >
    > 2) I don't need no rear-view mirror! I could turn my head just about
    > as easily and nearly as much as I always do on an upright! 'Matter of
    > fact, I was zipping along as fast as I ever did on my upright! Or,
    > rather, I should say, with as much effort as I typically do, which
    > brings me to my next observation...
    >
    > 3) I'm 5 mph slower!!!!! At least!!!!!!!! The amount of pedalling I
    > did would have been a good ~27mph, but the most I was able to manage
    > was a measly ~21!!! I hope this is just a matter of not having had the
    > right gears (due to the chain issue mentioned in another post, which,
    > unfortunately, seems unresolved) and 'bent muscles still
    > developing...which brings me to my next point...
    >
    > 4) I'm really feeling it! Not sore the next day, thankfully, but wow,
    > 'benting is like them leg exercise machines in the gym! I really
    > worked my glutes, my quads (mainly above the knees), and hamstrings.
    >
    > 5) Also, this reminds me of kayaking! Yes! Insofar as you've got to
    > keep the shoulders relaxed to make it work...with kayaking, you'd think
    > that it was about hacking away at the water with your manly arms on the
    > paddle, but it ain't, it's about relaxing the upper body enough to
    > coordinate its movement with the rest of the torso in order to paddle
    > efficiently! Likewise, at least on an SWB like the HP Velo SMGTe,
    > you'd think it was about maintaining firm control of the handlebars --
    > but it ain't! It's about relaxing your shoulders, arms, everything,
    > really...cool!
    >
    > 6) The headrest is a nice addition to the already very comfy BodyLink
    > hardshell seat. Actually, you'll definitely need the Airflow Cushion,
    > which costs $$$. Actually, every damned thing on this machine costs $$
    > -- can you believe the little two-inch computer mount is US$16??? But
    > it's a very fine ride..."magic carpet," as RCN said a couple of times.
    > I don't know how any other SWB maker stays in bid'ness!
    >
    > 7) It's fun going over bumps and potholes with the fully-suspended
    > SMGTe! At least with my Swiss Air DT air shock...though it seems to be
    > bottoming-out more than it should, so I'll need to adjust it. It's fun
    > going over speed bumps and jumping a few inches off the ground!
    > Hmm...maybe I should get a seat belt? Or a parachute!
    >
    > 8) Which segues again into this other note: the much lower vantage
    > point seem to make spotting potholes slightly harder! A couple of
    > times I'd been sort of surprised by a pothole that materialized as the
    > lay of the land suddenly came into sight. But this is not a major
    > issue, and now I can enjoy girls' plump pear posteriors without craning
    > my neck!
    >
    > 9) Speaking of whom...wow, this is more eye-catching than a car! You
    > know how females enjoy novelty...and the girls in Astoria Park were
    > really intrigued! I actually started getting shy...then wondered if
    > all they were interested in was my 'bent! But I did some chin-ups and
    > pull-ups to distract them...hehe....
    >
    >
    > WOOHOO!!!!


    Please be careful, your enthusiasm the last months for your 'bent
    project is apparently contagious! I find myself repeatedly visiting the
    Challenge website in secret.

    I may yet join the ranks of 'bent riders! A Hurricane Sport USS may be
    in my future.

    Joseph

    PS: The mental image of some crazed usenet-junkie doing chin-ups in
    Astoria park to impress some girls admiring his 'bent is a wonder to
    behold! I wonder if they would have thought you were so studly tooling
    around the office the other day!

    PPS: I'm just teasing. I really enjoy your posts, and your humor is
    right up my alley.
     
  4. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Please be careful, your enthusiasm the last months for your 'bent
    > project is apparently contagious! I find myself repeatedly visiting the
    > Challenge website in secret.
    >
    > I may yet join the ranks of 'bent riders! A Hurricane Sport USS may be
    > in my future.


    If possible try before you decide: I didn't get on very well with
    Challenge's seat when I tried a Mistral, which is a shame as I find many
    of their models /very/ desirable on paper :-(

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  5. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    Oh, that reminds me:

    10) I'm actually not so concerned about others not seeing me as much as
    I am that I won't see them! With this lower vantage point, I find that
    I can no longer peer into the cars parked alongside the curb to make
    sure no one is pulling out or opening a door. Major bummer!!!



    Tom Keats wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "NYC XYZ" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    > > 1) Cars are so much more respectful! Of course, this was Sunday, but
    > > the Grand Concourse is still, as its name suggests, a major
    > > thoroughfare.

    >
    > Heh :) If yer gonna commute, don't get suckered by the diff between
    > Sunday, and Monday morning's rush hour.
    >
    > Anyways, here's to yez:
    > http://www.metrolyrics.com/lyrics/70795/Easybeats/Friday_On_My_Mind
    >
    > > WOOHOO!!!!

    >
    > You kin say that again.
    >
    >
    > cheers,
    > Tom
    >
    > --
    > -- Nothing is safe from me.
    > Above address is just a spam midden.
    > I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  6. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    NYC XYZ wrote:

    > 2) I don't need no rear-view mirror!


    It's not /necessary/, certainly, but I find it quite helpful. For a
    definitive check I'll look behind anyway, but you don't get "false
    positives" from mirrors, so a glance down that tells you there's a car
    coming up fast will be right and it's just saved you the bother of
    looking over your shoulder.

    > 5) Also, this reminds me of kayaking! Yes! Insofar as you've got to
    > keep the shoulders relaxed to make it work...with kayaking, you'd think
    > that it was about hacking away at the water with your manly arms on the
    > paddle, but it ain't, it's about relaxing the upper body enough to
    > coordinate its movement with the rest of the torso in order to paddle
    > efficiently! Likewise, at least on an SWB like the HP Velo SMGTe,
    > you'd think it was about maintaining firm control of the handlebars --
    > but it ain't! It's about relaxing your shoulders, arms, everything,
    > really...cool!


    While you're quite right about relaxing being the key to control, I
    don't really see quite how you link that to kayaking, where you're
    actively trying to get as many upper-body muscles in on the action as
    you can!

    > 6) The headrest is a nice addition to the already very comfy BodyLink
    > hardshell seat. Actually, you'll definitely need the Airflow Cushion,
    > which costs $$$.


    While I prefer the Airflow to the default pad and consider it worth the
    extra money, it is not something that is /required/ for the bike to be
    workable.

    > I don't know how any other SWB maker stays in bid'ness!


    a) How many have you tried to compare the ride?, and b) there are plenty
    of other SWB designed with a very different brief. The Velokraft NoCom
    is a SWB, and does outright speed at the expense of anything else rather
    better than a Streetmachine. Depends what you want.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  7. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > Please be careful, your enthusiasm the last months for your 'bent
    > project is apparently contagious! I find myself repeatedly visiting the
    > Challenge website in secret.


    LOL, I was just there last night myself! I'm still interested in their
    SL line...mainly, the low weight has got me really curious as to its
    likely climbing capabilities! But after a Maxarya Ray-1X late this
    summer for a guest bike (and the intriguing CLWB design), I'll be
    looking into a fully faired and body-socked Easy Racers Gold Rush LWB!

    > I may yet join the ranks of 'bent riders! A Hurricane Sport USS may be
    > in my future.


    You'll never go back! There's a nice interesting article over at
    bentrideronline.com about riding a DF after six years on a 'bent. I
    really love my DF, but I honestly can't see it for anything other than
    errands now.

    > Joseph
    >
    > PS: The mental image of some crazed usenet-junkie doing chin-ups in
    > Astoria park to impress some girls admiring his 'bent is a wonder to
    > behold! I wonder if they would have thought you were so studly tooling
    > around the office the other day!


    You better lock up your wife and daughter if I put on my suit and tie!

    > PPS: I'm just teasing. I really enjoy your posts, and your humor is
    > right up my alley.


    Heh, they do say us 'bent-heads are weirdos!
     
  8. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:
    >
    >
    > It's not /necessary/, certainly, but I find it quite helpful. For a
    > definitive check I'll look behind anyway, but you don't get "false
    > positives" from mirrors, so a glance down that tells you there's a car
    > coming up fast will be right and it's just saved you the bother of
    > looking over your shoulder.


    This will sound counter-intuitive, but I think, at least in my case,
    *not* having a rear-view mirror contributes to safer biking! I mean,
    I'm a speed demon on a DF (not that I mean to be, but I recently found
    out that 20, 22, 25 mph is considered fast), but I will usually slow
    down before looking behind, and I almost never take risks (relatively
    speaking; after all, this is NYC!) -- I save the andrenaline rush for
    full-on pedal-mashing!

    But I've already bought a US$20 German rear-view mirror...so, unless it
    doesn't really fit, I'll have it installed.

    > While you're quite right about relaxing being the key to control, I
    > don't really see quite how you link that to kayaking, where you're
    > actively trying to get as many upper-body muscles in on the action as
    > you can!


    Well, I meant in the sense of relaxing the shoulders...even in
    kayaking, there's a certain relaxation of the shoulders...basically,
    the reality is counter-intuitive to what one might imagine.

    Another thing:

    11) Starting up is noticeably harder than on a DF. You really need to
    push hard on that first pedal or two before achieving a nice ~4 mph
    momentum to stabilize. Thus, starting up at the bottom of a slope is
    extremely hard, though possible. Starting up on a turn is similarly
    more time-consuming -- at least for a 'bent newbie like me.

    > While I prefer the Airflow to the default pad and consider it worth the
    > extra money, it is not something that is /required/ for the bike to be
    > workable.


    Well, no, not "required" to be "workable" but...the difference is so
    great that you feel like something is missing without that extra US$119
    Airflow Cushion "accessory."

    > a) How many have you tried to compare the ride?, and b) there are plenty
    > of other SWB designed with a very different brief. The Velokraft NoCom
    > is a SWB, and does outright speed at the expense of anything else rather
    > better than a Streetmachine. Depends what you want.


    A lot of folks get into 'bents due to the perceived greater comfort. I
    think only a small minority get into 'bents on account of the improved
    aerodynamics afforded by extreme low-racers. So for the comfort market
    that's looking into SWBs (as opposed to LWBs), it seems that the HP
    Velo SMGTe offers the best comfort available. Of course, as you say,
    it all depends on the "brief" one desires in a machine...there are
    other SWBs which divvy the comfort/performance issues differently than
    as evident on the SMGTe...but for those whom comfort is first and
    foremost (on a bike -- not a trike), the SMGTe is It.

    So I strongly encourage all the newbies who can afford it to seriously
    consider the HP Velotechnik Street Machine Gran Tourismo evoluzione.
    If you're into comfort on an SWB and you don't mind compromising
    performance, this is It.

    > Pete.
    > --
    > Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    > Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    > Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    > net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  9. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    NYC XYZ wrote:

    > 11) Starting up is noticeably harder than on a DF. You really need to
    > push hard on that first pedal or two before achieving a nice ~4 mph
    > momentum to stabilize. Thus, starting up at the bottom of a slope is
    > extremely hard, though possible. Starting up on a turn is similarly
    > more time-consuming -- at least for a 'bent newbie like me.


    Get into the habit of changing down before you stop. It's much
    easier to get going in a lower gear than pushing very hard.

    > A lot of folks get into 'bents due to the perceived greater comfort. I
    > think only a small minority get into 'bents on account of the improved
    > aerodynamics afforded by extreme low-racers. So for the comfort market
    > that's looking into SWBs (as opposed to LWBs), it seems that the HP
    > Velo SMGTe offers the best comfort available.


    But what else have you compared it too that you can reasonably say
    this? My partner prefers her Nazca Fiero for the same brief:
    comfortable loaded touring. She learned to ride a 'bent on my
    Streetmachine so she's well aware of what it's like, but it didn't
    even make her shortlist of potential bikes.

    > So I strongly encourage all the newbies who can afford it to seriously
    > consider the HP Velotechnik Street Machine Gran Tourismo evoluzione.
    > If you're into comfort on an SWB and you don't mind compromising
    > performance, this is It.


    Unless it's not... For a start I prefer the SMGT to the GTe
    because I prefer the seat on the older model to the Bodylink. It
    just fits me better. If you like the Bodylink then is the comfort
    of the Streetmachine GTe really significantly better than the
    Grasshopper, sporting the exact same seat?

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  10. Don't let your bent get stolen while you are doing chinups in Astoria Park!
    It is NY, you know.

    Good luck from a fellow HPVGTE rider.
     
  11. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    Jonathan Kaplan wrote:
    > Don't let your bent get stolen while you are doing chinups in Astoria Park!
    > It is NY, you know.
    >
    > Good luck from a fellow HPVGTE rider.




    GREAT point, well worth bearing always in mind.

    Thank you.
     
  12. Mark Leuck

    Mark Leuck Guest

    "NYC XYZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > 2) I don't need no rear-view mirror! I could turn my head just about
    > as easily and nearly as much as I always do on an upright! 'Matter of
    > fact, I was zipping along as fast as I ever did on my upright! Or,
    > rather, I should say, with as much effort as I typically do, which
    > brings me to my next observation...


    Only a fool would ride without a mirror, please get one

    > 3) I'm 5 mph slower!!!!! At least!!!!!!!! The amount of pedalling I
    > did would have been a good ~27mph, but the most I was able to manage
    > was a measly ~21!!! I hope this is just a matter of not having had the
    > right gears (due to the chain issue mentioned in another post, which,
    > unfortunately, seems unresolved) and 'bent muscles still
    > developing...which brings me to my next point...


    And a more accurate speedometer?
     
  13. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Mark Leuck wrote:

    > Only a fool would ride without a mirror, please get one


    That's completely over the top. Thousands of riders don't use mirrors
    and get about quite safely.

    It's almost as dopey as saying you're doomed without a helmet...

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  14. Wilko

    Wilko Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:
    > Mark Leuck wrote:
    >
    >> Only a fool would ride without a mirror, please get one

    >
    > That's completely over the top. Thousands of riders don't use mirrors
    > and get about quite safely.
    >
    > It's almost as dopey as saying you're doomed without a helmet...


    Even better, make that millions of riders!

    Come and have a look at the Netherlands, where a lot bigger percentage
    of people ride a bike to work, school etc. every day, but where mirrors
    on bikes are almost non-existant, and where helmets for people not
    riding racing or (real) mountain bikes are very rare indeed.

    Wanna call all of those people fools, Mark?

    --
    Wilko van den Bergh wilko<a t)dse(d o t>nl
    Eindhoven The Netherlands Europe
    ---Look at the possibilities, don't worry about the limitations.---
    http://kayaker.nl/
     
  15. I had to delay my purchase of a Bent :-( My daughter needed some
    money to pay in advance for a Summer Session college class, and her
    board for the Fall. I asked my wife, "What's more important?"

    Hopefully in the next month or two!
    Jim Gagnepain
    http://home.comcast.net/~oil_free_and_happy/
     
  16. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Mark Leuck" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Only a fool would ride without a mirror, please get one
    >

    ???? Do you ride a style of recumbent that makes it hard to turn your head
    for a quick glance?

    This certainly doesn't apply to most riders or most situations.
     
  17. Mark Leuck

    Mark Leuck Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Mark Leuck wrote:
    >
    > > Only a fool would ride without a mirror, please get one

    >
    > That's completely over the top. Thousands of riders don't use mirrors
    > and get about quite safely.
    >
    > It's almost as dopey as saying you're doomed without a helmet...
    >
    > Pete.


    On a normal bike I can see your point however on a recumbent it's a
    different matter
     
  18. Mark Leuck

    Mark Leuck Guest

    "Wilko" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    >
    > Come and have a look at the Netherlands, where a lot bigger percentage
    > of people ride a bike to work, school etc. every day, but where mirrors
    > on bikes are almost non-existant, and where helmets for people not
    > riding racing or (real) mountain bikes are very rare indeed.
    >
    > Wanna call all of those people fools, Mark?


    Well yea they are European after all
     
  19. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    Mark Leuck wrote:
    >
    >
    > On a normal bike I can see your point however on a recumbent it's a
    > different matter




    Dude, I was real surprised myself -- I'd even bought a $20 German
    rear-view mirror in anticipation. But I'd taken it out for a spin
    before installing the mirror, having forgotten all about it -- then I
    realized, hey! I'm looking behind me naturally, instinctively turning
    my head after scanning the road ahead and slowing down, and I've been
    turning my head all along without realizing it!!

    I'll need a few more rides to be real sure, but for now I honestly
    believe that I don't "need" a mirror! At no time did I feel
    inconvenienced, such that I totally forgot I didn't have a mirror at
    first!
     
  20. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    Mark Leuck wrote:
    >
    >
    > Well yea they are European after all



    I must say -- I think we need more of the modern European ethos in our
    society.

    Legalize prostitution!

    Six weeks of paid vacation -- on top of paid sick days!!

    And no darned helmet laws!
     
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