Worry, worry, fret, fret ...

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Wafflycathcsdir, Mar 24, 2003.

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  1. It's a hard life being a mother. This morning is the first one Vernon & I have allowed Nathan to
    cycle to school unaccompanied.

    I *know* you can't wrap them in cotton wool, but we do get HGVs on narrow roads etc., etc. What we
    did was let Nathan cycle & later I set off with his school bags a la cage mode, so he wouldn't be
    weighed down by three ton of school stuff - they don't have desks these days and all books are
    transported to & from school on a daily basis - then there's the games kit and the graphics kit ...
    This afternoon, either V or I will go to pick up the bags so Nathan can cycle home okay.

    Nathan set off with helmet on bonce and wearing his fluorescent/reflective waistcoat, as all his
    school clothes are dark (black apart from white shirt & marroon jersey) - black shoes, socks,
    trousers & fleece.

    On the plus side, I *know* it's helping him develop road sense & I *know* it's all part of growing
    up and gaining some independence from the old farts, but as a mother I still *worry*. Heaven help
    any driver who hurts my son - he or she would have to hide for the rest of his/her life!

    Cheers, helen s (now in full worry mode for the solo return cycle ride from school to home ...)

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Flush out that intestinal parasite and/or the waste product before sending a reply!

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
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  2. On 24 Mar 2003 09:15:44 GMT, [email protected] (wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter) in
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >It's a hard life being a mother. This morning is the first one Vernon & I have allowed Nathan to
    >cycle to school unaccompanied.
    >
    >I *know* you can't wrap them in cotton wool, but we do get HGVs on narrow roads etc., etc. What we
    >did was let Nathan cycle & later I set off with his school bags a la cage mode, so he wouldn't be
    >weighed down by three ton of school

    I'm sure he has had an excellent cycling teacher thus far in his life! How old is Nathan? Does his
    school have decent facilities for cyclists?

    Just out of interest, why are you caging his equipment to him, and not cycling yourself?

    My fiancee still worries about me cycling, and I *have* to text her to let her know I've arrived
    home safely!

    I am taking her for her first cycling experience (in about 20 years) soon. Wish me luck!

    Love and showers from Rich xx

    --
    Two fish suddenly swim into a brick wall. Damn! To reply put only the word "richard" before
    the @ sign
     
  3. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > It's a hard life being a mother. This morning is the first one Vernon & I
    have
    > allowed Nathan to cycle to school unaccompanied.

    Well done. Nathan will doubtless be fine and you will have spent the day worrying for nothing.

    No too sure about doing the school run just for the books -- but I guess this is a short term fix.

    Look at it from Nathan's point of view. He knows he is trusted, he knows he has cycled the route
    many times before with you, he has a new measure of freedom and a time slot where he is not
    'controlled' by either school or home. If he uses that responsibly it will doubtless grow -- so, by
    the time some of his mates are let off the apron strings he will have learned to use the freedom
    sensibly while they may be drunk on their new found freedom.

    Also, he has his own personal transport -- so his freedom is less constrained than those who always
    have to be caged to get from A to B.

    Good move. A very minor increase in risk today for a longer term reduction in risk due to increased
    personal responsibility.

    Now -- enjoy your day of fretting -- and remember, no news is good news. Bad news travels like the
    wind. Good news strolls round when its ready for tea.

    T
     
  4. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter wrote:
    > It's a hard life being a mother. This morning is the first one Vernon & I have allowed Nathan to
    > cycle to school unaccompanied.
    >
    > I *know* you can't wrap them in cotton wool, but we do get HGVs on narrow roads etc., etc.

    From what you've written before, I know that you've done plenty of cycling with Nathan on the roads.
    So by now, he would have learnt the correct distance to ride from the edge and how to make right
    turns, etc. I reckon there's a greater chance of him injuring himself slipping over in the
    playground than getting in trouble on the way there.

    It's the parents that have never cycled with their children who should worry!

    ~PB
     
  5. >Well done. Nathan will doubtless be fine and you will have spent the day worrying for nothing.

    Oh I really, really hope so - but it doesn't stop the maternal instinct from going into overdrive!

    >No too sure about doing the school run just for the books -- but I guess this is a short term fix.

    Oh it is - We are waiting until Thursday to purchase *hopefully* one of the locakble rack packs from
    Lidl which should be big enough to take his books at least, plus provide daytime storage for helmet
    etc. I'm serious in whinging about the amount of stuff he has to carry everyday - it is
    *ridiculous*. Back pack with books - stuffed full & heavy - games holdall full of gym/games stuff, &
    A2 portfolio for graphics ... it's not fun! It's way more than he's had to carry before, now he's on
    GCSEs. We'll be working out the most effective transportation over the cvoming days via trial &
    error I think.

    >Look at it from Nathan's point of view. He knows he is trusted, he knows he has cycled the route
    >many times before with you, he has a new measure of freedom and a time slot where he is not
    >'controlled' by either school or home. If he uses that responsibly it will doubtless grow -- so, by
    >the time some of his mates are let off the apron strings he will have learned to use the freedom
    >sensibly while they may be drunk on their new found freedom.

    That's the theory :)

    >Also, he has his own personal transport -- so his freedom is less constrained than those who always
    >have to be caged to get from A to B.
    >
    >Good move. A very minor increase in risk today for a longer term reduction in risk due to increased
    >personal responsibility.

    True, but still that old maternal instinct ..

    >Now -- enjoy your day of fretting -- and remember, no news is good news. Bad news travels like the
    >wind. Good news strolls round when its ready for tea.

    True - hmm... do I have any fingernails left?

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Flush out that intestinal parasite and/or the waste product before sending a reply!

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  6. >I'm sure he has had an excellent cycling teacher thus far in his life! How old is Nathan? Does his
    >school have decent facilities for cyclists?

    Well, a sort of partially covered bike shed with lots of bike racks. Nowhere to store bike helmet -
    his teacher last year insisted on advance notice of his cycling to be able to give permission to
    store his helmet in a locked cupboard during the day. Go figure.

    >
    >Just out of interest, why are you caging his equipment to him, and not cycling yourself?

    I may be large, but I am not a commando - Back pack full of books + large graphics folio do not easy
    transport make. Besides which the idea is to allow Nathan to cycle alone, without his mother huffing
    & puffing along acting as a cycling pack mule :) We'll sort out the most effective way to transport
    heavies by bike over the coming days.

    >
    >My fiancee still worries about me cycling, and I *have* to text her to let her know I've arrived
    >home safely!
    >
    >I am taking her for her first cycling experience (in about 20 years) soon. Wish me luck!

    Good luck & be gentle on her - encourage, don't nag if she's slower than you & finds it hard going.

    >
    >Love and showers from Rich xx

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Flush out that intestinal parasite and/or the waste product before sending a reply!

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  7. >From what you've written before, I know that you've done plenty of cycling with Nathan on the
    >roads. So by now, he would have learnt the correct distance to ride from the edge and how to make
    >right turns, etc. I reckon there's a greater chance of him injuring himself slipping over in the
    >playground than getting in trouble on the way there.

    You are correct, but it doesn't stop the innate mother instinct from going into overdrive ;-)

    >
    >It's the parents that have never cycled with their children who should worry!
    >

    Indeed.

    >~PB

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Flush out that intestinal parasite and/or the waste product before sending a reply!

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  8. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Well, a sort of partially covered bike shed with lots of bike racks.
    Nowhere to
    > store bike helmet - his teacher last year insisted on advance notice of
    his
    > cycling to be able to give permission to store his helmet in a locked
    cupboard
    > during the day. Go figure.

    Soiunds like a positive attitude to cycling. Obviously its OK for the kids to die early of obesity
    but taking excercise is to be surrounded by H&S Nazis and their rules :(

    T
     
  9. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Oh I really, really hope so - but it doesn't stop the maternal instinct
    from
    > going into overdrive!

    No cure for that -- sorry.

    >
    > That's the theory :)

    We all survived!!

    T
     
  10. John B

    John B Guest

    Tony W wrote:

    > "wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > Well, a sort of partially covered bike shed with lots of bike racks.
    > Nowhere to
    > > store bike helmet - his teacher last year insisted on advance notice of
    > his
    > > cycling to be able to give permission to store his helmet in a locked
    > cupboard
    > > during the day. Go figure.
    >
    > Soiunds like a positive attitude to cycling. Obviously its OK for the kids to die early of obesity
    > but taking excercise is to be surrounded by H&S Nazis and their rules :(
    >
    > T

    One local school had to admit that their ban on cycling to school could not be policed. Instead they
    said that they would insist that anyone who cycled (ie brought a cycle into school) had to have a
    helmet and that they would not allow helmets on the premises as they had no secure storage.

    These attitudes makes you want to cry.

    John B
     
  11. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    [email protected] (wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > >From what you've written before, I know that you've done plenty of cycling with Nathan on the
    > >roads. So by now, he would have learnt the correct distance to ride from the edge and how to make
    > >right turns, etc.

    Correct. He's been well taught and understands how to ride on the road. He should be OK.

    > You are correct, but it doesn't stop the innate mother instinct from going into overdrive ;-)

    Also correct. There is nothing you can do about this. The alternative is never to let him out of
    your sight. At some stage you have to let go a bit. You've prepared him as well as you can. You can
    do no more.

    --
    Dave...
     
  12. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "John B" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > One local school had to admit that their ban on cycling to school could
    not be
    > policed. Instead they said that they would insist that anyone who cycled (ie
    brought a
    > cycle into school) had to have a helmet and that they would not allow
    helmets
    > on the premises as they had no secure storage.
    >
    > These attitudes makes you want to cry.

    Such attitudes should be exposed for the cant that they are.

    T
     
  13. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter <[email protected]> wrote:
    > It's a hard life being a mother. This morning is the first one Vernon & I have allowed Nathan to
    > cycle to school unaccompanied.
    >

    But that's what parents are for. And kids try very hard to enable parents to fulfil their purpose
    in life ;-)

    Tony

    -- http://www.raven-family.com

    "You can't scare me, I've got kids"
     
  14. Mark Felber

    Mark Felber Guest

    "wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter" wrote >

    Nathan set off with helmet on bonce and wearing his fluorescent/reflective
    > waistcoat, as all his school clothes are dark (black apart from white
    shirt &
    > marroon jersey) - black shoes, socks, trousers & fleece.

    Next time put his helmet on his head...

    Motorists who have passed me on my bike tell me that a flashing blinkie light does more for
    visibility than a reflective/fluorescent vest, even in daytime. Seems to be especially true in
    inclement weather.
    --
    mark
     
  15. Mark Felber

    Mark Felber Guest

    "wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter" wrote
    > >How old is Nathan? Does his school have decent facilities for cyclists?
    >
    > Well, a sort of partially covered bike shed with lots of bike racks.
    Nowhere to
    > store bike helmet - his teacher last year insisted on advance notice of
    his
    > cycling to be able to give permission to store his helmet in a locked
    cupboard
    > during the day. Go figure.
    I I've always locked my helmet to the D-lock through one of the straps, taking care to position it
    so that it won't fill up with rain or snow during the work day. The D-lock, of course, is then
    locked to the bike frame, at least one bike wheel, and a fixed object.

    > >Just out of interest, why are you caging his equipment to him, and not cycling yourself?
    >
    >
    > I may be large, but I am not a commando - Back pack full of books + large graphics folio do not
    > easy transport make. Besides which the idea is to
    allow
    > Nathan to cycle alone, without his mother huffing & puffing along acting
    as a
    > cycling pack mule :) We'll sort out the most effective way to transport
    heavies
    > by bike over the coming days.
    >
    I've been quite happy with a large messenger bag augented by a Carradice seat bag. The messenger bag
    is nice because it rides lower on me for better stability on the bike than a backpack would offer,
    it comes with me when I get off the bike (no worries of theft), and it has an attachment point for a
    blinkie / LED light.
    --
    mark
     
  16. "wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >Well done. Nathan will doubtless be fine and you will have spent the day worrying for nothing.
    >
    > Oh I really, really hope so - but it doesn't stop the maternal instinct
    from
    > going into overdrive!
    >

    I may have mentioned previously how in 1981/2, I was finally allowed to cycle past Pound Lane,
    Thatcham (we lived there in the early 80s) unaccompanied (my parents were worried about a depot
    there where there were lots of HGVs). My mum would always say "be careful on your bike, with all
    that traffic".

    Unfortunately due to silly rules I wasn't allowed to cycle to secondary school (but I certainly make
    up for it now)

    Every time I go out now my mum *still* says "be careful on your bike, with all that traffic". I was
    *31* last week ;)

    Alex
     
  17. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    John B <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > One local school had to admit that their ban on cycling to school could not be policed. Instead
    > they said that they would insist that anyone who cycled (ie brought a cycle into school) had to
    > have a helmet and that they would not allow helmets on the premises as they had no secure storage.

    An extreme example of how helmet compulsion reduces cycling. Luckily secure indoor helmet storage is
    not required. This link shows how to secure a bike using a D lock and a non-curly cable.

    http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfromthepast/HOW2LOCK.JPG

    The cable simply has to be threaded though the helmet slats to secure that as well.

    --
    Dave...
     
  18. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    "Mr [email protected] \(2.3 zulu-alpha\) [comms room 2]" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > Every time I go out now my mum *still* says "be careful on your bike, with all that traffic". I
    > was *31* last week ;)

    Mine used to worry about me cycling too until I was well into my thirties. That's why I told Helen
    there's really nothing she can do about it. It goes with motherhood. No amount of reassurance can
    overcome her certain knowledge that cyclists sometimes get hurt. At least he's less likely than the
    rest of us to get paving-slabbed if he's caught wearing bib shorts.

    --
    Dave...
     
  19. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    Mr [email protected] wrote:
    > Every time I go out now my mum *still* says "be careful on your bike, with all that traffic". I
    > was *31* last week ;)

    I can remember dropping in on my Nanna once on the way home from work. At the time, the journey home
    from my grandparents' house was about 8 miles, mostly along the A26 (Tunbridge Wells to
    Crowborough). She was shocked that I planned to cycle home and made me promise to phone her as soon
    as I arrived.

    Of course, I forgot. I was so used to cycling that way (sometimes more than once a day) that I
    didn't think when I got home "Ooh, I've just done something out of the ordinary, someone might be
    worried". So a couple of hours later I received a frantic phone call to check that I'd arrived
    home safely.

    I was 24 at the time (soon afterwards I got into the habit of going there for dinner every Tuesday
    evening, and she got used to the idea of me riding home, but of course she still worries).

    --
    Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    Thomas Paine
     
  20. I still phone my parents when I've arrived home safely (by Tube & bus)!

    Helen Age 44¾

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
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