worrying driver behaviour?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Colin, Mar 15, 2003.

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  1. Colin

    Colin Guest

    Hi all.

    Decided to make good use of the afternoon sunshine today, and take the bike out for spin. (I
    normally commute the 3 miles to work and back on it, but really need to get some more miles in
    to improve my fitness levels etc.) Anyway, out on the road most drivers are passing me with a
    decent amount of space, but one particular one passes far too close, drawing an annoyed "W?nk?r"
    from me (though not terribly loud, and his windows were closed, seeing as how I'm not the
    confrontational type <g>)

    Anyway, soon after I see the same car coming back the other way, and pulling into a pub car park
    ahead; he's obviously not going for a drink though, as he turns around and stops at the entrance,
    and I assume he's waiting for a gap in the traffic. However, as I'm about a hundred yards from the
    entrance, I realise that he's had ample opportunity to pull out onto the road, but still hasn't, so
    I stop and watch, since I now don't trust the situation. He waits, I wait, and eventually he pulls
    out onto the road and drives off in his original direction, away from me, so I carry on, keeping a
    wary eye open around each bend to see if he's waiting for me further on.

    Conclusions are: He heard my comment on his driving style and came back to have a go, either
    verbally or otherwise; He was lost and came back to find his way / look at a map (though odd that he
    should come back to do so, rather than pulling in ahead); or he wanted to comment my unusual (round
    my way, anyway) bike, since I ride a recumbent.

    Now maybe I'm just paranoid, or maybe I assessed the situation correctly (I find that when I'm
    riding the bike, I'm much more conscious of potential danger than at any other time - you have to
    be, really), but I wondered if anyone else has had a similar occurrence, and how they dealt with it?
    Maybe I should take my D-lock along next time I'm out ;)

    Cheers,

    Colin
     
    Tags:


  2. In news:[email protected], Colin <[email protected]> typed:

    > Now maybe I'm just paranoid, or maybe I assessed the situation correctly (I find that when I'm
    > riding the bike, I'm much more conscious of potential danger than at any other time - you have to
    > be, really), but I wondered if anyone else has had a similar occurrence, and how they dealt with
    > it? Maybe I should take my D-lock along next time I'm out ;)
    >

    Colin, IMO you did *exactly* the right thing. In a world full of intolerance and hate (*especially*
    on the roads) a *controlled* amount of paranoia is a *Good Thing*, and your non-aggressive but
    vigilant actions kept you out of trouble (its no fun for the cager ramming people if they *see* if
    coming, especially if they get their number taken and passed to the old bill)

    Alex
     
  3. Allen Foster

    Allen Foster Guest

    Another 'dangerous behaviour' that I've noticed from some motorists.

    One of my training rides I travel for a short time along a dual carriageway to get to the quieter
    country roads. Running part of the way along the carriageway is a cycle lane of sorts, I say of
    sorts because it is often full of glass and mounds of stones and other road debris. On a road bike
    with narrow tyres I don't think it's safe to ride in the lane for fear of a bad tyre failure or fall
    so I usually stick to the carriageway. For the most part I'm fine but I have on occasion
    (particularly with HGVs) been forced into the cycle lane by motorists who refuse to give me room.
    Most seem to think that if there is a cycle lane, the cyclist must use it, even if it would in fact
    be more hazardous to do so.

    Allen

    On Sat, 15 Mar 2003 20:03:08 -0000, "Colin" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hi all.
    >
    >Decided to make good use of the afternoon sunshine today, and take the bike out for spin. (I
    >normally commute the 3 miles to work and back on it, but really need to get some more miles in to
    >improve my fitness levels etc.) Anyway, out on the road most drivers are passing me with a decent
    >amount of space, but one particular one passes far too close, drawing an annoyed "W?nk?r" from me
    >(though not terribly loud, and his windows were closed, seeing as how I'm not the confrontational
    >type <g>)
    >
    >Anyway, soon after I see the same car coming back the other way, and pulling into a pub car park
    >ahead; he's obviously not going for a drink though, as he turns around and stops at the entrance,
    >and I assume he's waiting for a gap in the traffic. However, as I'm about a hundred yards from the
    >entrance, I realise that he's had ample opportunity to pull out onto the road, but still hasn't, so
    >I stop and watch, since I now don't trust the situation. He waits, I wait, and eventually he pulls
    >out onto the road and drives off in his original direction, away from me, so I carry on, keeping a
    >wary eye open around each bend to see if he's waiting for me further on.
    >
    >Conclusions are: He heard my comment on his driving style and came back to have a go, either
    >verbally or otherwise; He was lost and came back to find his way / look at a map (though odd that
    >he should come back to do so, rather than pulling in ahead); or he wanted to comment my unusual
    >(round my way, anyway) bike, since I ride a recumbent.
    >
    >Now maybe I'm just paranoid, or maybe I assessed the situation correctly (I find that when I'm
    >riding the bike, I'm much more conscious of potential danger than at any other time - you have to
    >be, really), but I wondered if anyone else has had a similar occurrence, and how they dealt with
    >it? Maybe I should take my D-lock along next time I'm out ;)
    >
    >Cheers,
    >
    >Colin
     
  4. Tim Dunne

    Tim Dunne Guest

    "Colin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Now maybe I'm just paranoid, or maybe I assessed the situation correctly
    (I
    > find that when I'm riding the bike, I'm much more conscious of potential danger than at any other
    > time - you have to be, really), but I wondered if anyone else has had a similar occurrence, and
    > how they dealt with it?
    Maybe
    > I should take my D-lock along next time I'm out ;)

    Yeah, wise move. I've noticed an increase in Brum recently of two habits: pulling over in a queue of
    traffic (to either side) to hinder the passage of a cyclist (even though motorist is damn near
    stationary and has nothing to gain) - there's one son of a tulip who does this to me every morning.

    The second is stabbing the horn when just behind or overtaking. Is it some king of penis extension?
    I know bloody well you're there - just because you've found the horn[1] doesn't mean I'm going to
    vapourise. Live with it.

    Tim

    [1] Usually they seem to find the car horn, but the indicators seem more elusive.

    --
    Sent from Brum, UK... ...scheduled completion Sept 2003 'What's keeping the White House white? Is it
    chalk, is it fog, is it fear?' Steve Skaith, 'America For Beginners' Look, mum, an anorak on a bike!
    Check out www.nervouscyclist.org
     
  5. T I M

    T I M Guest

    On Sat, 15 Mar 2003 20:03:08 -0000, "Colin" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hi all.
    >
    >Decided to make good use of the afternoon sunshine today, and take the bike out for spin. (I
    >normally commute the 3 miles to work and back on it, but really need to get some more miles in to
    >improve my fitness levels etc.) Anyway, out on the road most drivers are passing me with a decent
    >amount of space, but one particular one passes far too close, drawing an annoyed "W?nk?r" from me
    >(though not terribly loud, and his windows were closed, seeing as how I'm not the confrontational
    >type <g>)
    <snip>

    [Tim] Hi Colin,

    Hmm, maybe he managed to get to Hertfordshire and hassle 'us' ?

    My 12yr old daughter, my next-door-neigbour and I decided to go for a fun ride along the
    track-n-trails near us on our MTB's. To get to the tracks we first need to cover about 1/4 mile on
    the local roads (no probs there).

    At the destination (7 miles) end we popped into the Mother in laws for a cuppa and then back onto
    the tracks for the journey home. We were approaching a small roundabout (going north) as a car was
    doing the same (south) .. we got to the roundabout first (indicating right etc) and then to my great
    surprise the car did a 'U' turn, effectively going the wrong side of the roundabout and going
    straight across our path! I came to a rapid (but safe) halt (as did the other two) and then, and
    much to my further surprise, HE mouthed 'w#n*er' AT ME .. for (I suppose) being on the road at all?

    My mate (another 6'2" bloke) sorta watched him drive off (I'm not sure what he was going to do) but
    with my daughter with us I didn't fancy any confrontation.

    Next time we go out I'm packing a 9mm, some petrol and a box of matches .. (well, in my dreams ..)

    Ride safe ...

    T i m
     
  6. > The second is stabbing the horn when just behind or overtaking. Is it some king of penis
    > extension? I know bloody well you're there - just because you've found the horn[1] doesn't mean
    > I'm going to vapourise. Live with
    it.

    Unfortunately drivers believe they are being concientous, they are advised by drivig instructors,
    particularly on advanced courses to use the horn to let the cyclist know tey are there. This needs
    some reeducation for drivers / instructors and maybe more tolerance by us cyclists

    Kevin
     
  7. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Kvin Stephens" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Unfortunately drivers believe they are being concientous, they are advised by drivig instructors,
    > particularly on advanced courses to use the horn to let the cyclist know tey are there. This needs
    > some reeducation for
    drivers
    > / instructors and maybe more tolerance by us cyclists

    Most of the time I do not have too much trouble with drivers. While I am not the most tolerant I do
    find the majority of drivers act out of ignorance rather than malice and, by indicating clearly and
    standing up for your rights by being definite about your road positioning and moves most problems
    can be overcome.

    I find the more professional the driver the more conscientious and tolerant they tend to be. Last
    Friday I declared POETS* day at about 4:00 pm and took a gentle spin along a B road. It was much
    busier than normal (and has been deleted from the options on Friday evening :( ). There is a double
    white line along part of the road so, as usual the cars were squeezing me a little more than I would
    prefer. But -- it was very noticeable that WVM -- especially those from courier companies (UPS,
    Securicor etc.) gave me plenty of space, as did the couple of larger trucks. A tractor, pulling a
    mobile hay stack, on the other hand, nearly had me in the ditch -- as did a couple of SUV's laden
    with teenagers more than able to get themselves back & forth to school without the aid of Mum.

    But -- one thing guaranteed to wind me up is the prick with the horn. Don't these simians understand
    that I can hear the death rattle of their penis extension at half a mile and smell it at 100 yards?
    All it says to be is 'beware -- complete dick-head overtaking'.

    T

    * Piss off early, tomorrow's Saturday.
     
  8. Tim Dunne

    Tim Dunne Guest

    "Kvin Stephens" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Unfortunately drivers believe they are being concientous, they are advised by drivig instructors,
    > particularly on advanced courses to use the horn to let the cyclist know tey are there.

    When they're right on top of you? I'm sorry, what I've seen is agression.

    > This needs some reeducation for drivers / instructors and maybe more tolerance by us cyclists

    Hmmm.

    Tim
    --
    Sent from Brum, UK... ...scheduled completion Sept 2003 'What's keeping the White House white? Is it
    chalk, is it fog, is it fear?' Steve Skaith, 'America For Beginners' Look, mum, an anorak on a bike!
    Check out www.nervouscyclist.org
     
  9. Tim Dunne

    Tim Dunne Guest

    "Tony W" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    8<..

    Yeah, what he said. I refuse to believe that the backwards-wearing baseball hat brigade are doing it
    it out of consideration.

    Tim

    --
    Sent from Brum, UK... ...scheduled completion Sept 2003 'What's keeping the White House white? Is it
    chalk, is it fog, is it fear?' Steve Skaith, 'America For Beginners' Look, mum, an anorak on a bike!
    Check out www.nervouscyclist.org
     
  10. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Tue, 18 Mar 2003 08:46:16 -0000 someone who may be "Kvin Stephens"
    <[email protected]> wrote this:-

    >Unfortunately drivers believe they are being concientous,

    Incorrect.

    Only some believe they are behaving in that way.

    > they are advised by drivig instructors, particularly on advanced courses to use the horn to let
    > the cyclist know tey are there.

    Correct.

    However, I doubt if any such instructor advises anyone to position their motor vehicle a few inches
    behind a cycle and then sound the horn for a long time.

    Also I find it difficult to believe that those who organise such courses have never been advised by
    the cycling lobby that this particular idea is nothing other than a cause of danger to cyclists.

    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number F566DA0E I will always explain revoked
    keys, unless the UK government prevents me using the RIP Act 2000.
     
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