Worth fixing this bike?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Connor91, Oct 1, 2013.

  1. Connor91

    Connor91 New Member

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    I just got done cleaning out my garage and found this bike of my dad's. I believe it is from the '80s.

    Anyone know anything about it?

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  2. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    Depends...

    If you want to trash it later then you can maybe just lube it and get some commuting miles before recycling it.

    For example it does -worth- fixing up my appartment but I will be still living with my gypsy thieves neighbours so... (of which one sued me, again after having the charges on the last one dropped and had some charges added up on him instead, I live next to a gypsy psycho! Cool huh? [​IMG] Nothing to do with the bike but this forum is cheaper then therapy. [​IMG])

    If on the other hand you want to have a nice Sunday ride bike, or something like that, or if you are terribly bored and got the funds, the time and want to fix it then sure why not? In any case it would make an awesome commuter, as steel bikes tend to be a bit indestructible if kept properly and not crashed. Maybe you wanna be a bit careful slamming the thin cromoly tubes on lamposts for locking the bike etc... Maybe you could get a frame protector tube thing, to prevent scratches from the locks and the posts, like these chainstay protectors.

    There is a good website its called "Sheldon Brown" something. Its got lots of info about bikes like these (and other bikes in general). But I remember reading something there about the forks of older bikes not "passing" todays safety requirements. Maybe you wanna check it too just in case you kinda "need" to replace the fork. I mean nobody replaces parts in 1940's museum exhibit airplanes, but nobody is flying them either...

    It looks like a nice cromoly road bike. Its lug-welded. Not sure of brand etc, value etc... Somebody else might fill in this.

    Btw In the collecting world it happens alot that "odd" items, sometimes items that were not so massively produced because people would not buy them, quite often because they were terrible[​IMG], make the rarest most expensive items later. [​IMG]

    It doesnt look like its in a very bad shape. I would try to save the original paint-job by just removing the rust (somehow). Looks good actually! [​IMG] I suspect that most of the rust might actually be just dirt. You could try starting to rub it with a cloth and some oil to see what comes off and then remove the oil... There are probably lots of ways to remove the rust.

    Keeping the original paintjob also adds another advantage, that if you see any cracks in it they are possible spots of frame cracks.

    Good luck! [​IMG]
     
  3. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    I haven't seen those old shimaNO 'large thread' pedals in three decades. You would have to replace the crankset if the pedal bearing fail as those threads never became a standard. The platform drop/offset was for better power transfer and yielded a very low stack height.

    The groupset (shimaNO 600AX groupset?) was one of the first 'aero' groups with streamlined brake calipers, downtube shifters that were affixed to a brazed-on boss on top of the downtube instead of the conventional side braze-ons. Again, replacement for that shifter would be an eBay search.

    The aero bottle/cage is also somewhat of a rarity, although collector value would be low.

    This model was a fairly nice mid-line model in the Araya lineup and would have been a good 'starter bike' for an aspiring young racer back in the day. It probably sold for around $400. Vista, Lotus and Tsunoda all manufactured similar or identical models with the Dura Ace aero 'AX' groupset generally being paired with frames brazed up from Tange aerodynamic, teardrop shaped tubing while lesser models used round tubes.

    Your example appears to be all original and unmolested. It is missing only its toe straps and possibly a factory shipped tire pump (it would have been a frame fit, I'm thinking).

    Overall, it is well worth detail cleaning the bike, lubricating all the bearings, fitting new tires/tubes and riding it or stashing it away. Selling it on Craigslist might fetch $50-$100...probably closer to $50. The vintage would be 1980 to 1984 and if it were mine I would keep it as an example of early aero design.

    Is the pump umbrella clip on the seat tube a Campagnolo part or Asian copy? If Asian, your bike might have shipped with a non-frame fit pump or a frame fit pump that was later lost or replaced with one held in place with an umbrella clip. My memory is failing here and maybe some owners of these old Japanese aero machines can chime in.
     
  4. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Quote: Originally Posted by Connor91 .
    I just got done cleaning out my garage and found this bike of my dad's. I believe it is from the '80s.

    Anyone know anything about it?

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    FWIW. By my reckoning, the bike dates to the very early 80s (the "aero" placement of the shift levers is the first clue).

    Despite your misgivings due to what is probably a seemingly hefty weight in the 21+ lb. range, it was probably a pretty high end bike ...

    1. very clean lug work on the frame
    2. probably a San Marco CONCOR saddle
    3. probably Shimano Dura Ace AX (c1982 +/-) components -- very high end ...
    ​
    ​​I am not sure that one could pay more for any component group at the time.

    • Is THAT how you found it, or did you move the saddle down to accommodate yourself?

    Now, the question is "What do you mean by 'Worth fixing this bike'?"

    Do you mean should you ensure that the chain is lubed & the tires inflated AND will you be embarrassed to be seen riding it OR do you mean should you try to update it with contemporary components OR something else?
     
  5. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Quote: Originally Posted by CAMPYBOB .
    Overall, it is well worth detail cleaning the bike, lubricating all the bearings, fitting new tires/tubes and riding it or stashing it away. Selling it on Craigslist might fetch $50-$100...probably closer to $50. The vintage would be 1980 to 1984 and if it were mine I would keep it as an example of early aero design.



    Regardless of the components, I believe the value will be severely minimized if the bike is sold via Craigslist ...

    While vintage Shimano "stuff" does not command the premium which some vintage CampagnoloIo components command, I think the bike could potentially be worth as much as 10x the low estimate ...

    BTW. I reckon it is a Dura Ace AX group because of the brake caliper which I do not believe was shared with other AX groups ...

    The crank arm will indicate whether it is a Dura Ace AX group, or not.

    There used to be reducing "plugs" which could be inserted in those cavernous pedal threads to accommodate using normal sized pedals.
     
  6. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    "There used to be reducing "plugs" which could be inserted in those cavernous pedal threads to accommodate using normal sized pedals."
    Good memory, Alf. Yes, there were thread adapters sold for the large 'external' bearing shimaNO pedals. Good luck finding them now though! I remember Nashbar used to have them in the Youngstown Outlet Store, loose in a cardboard box. Black oxide finish with a wrench hex on the outboard face for installation/removal. Those brakes were also in the 600 AX groupset. Google BR-6300 brakes to see pictures. Worth...yeah. It's all hypothetical and esoteric, but actual selling prices for that stuff is pretty low. Especially given the rusted and corroded condition of the OP's example. I imagine parting out the bike and re-polishing everything prior to sale might fetch $500, but I think that's even a stretch. The vintage-used bike collector's market is a very, very small niche and even high end stuff (where the buyers with cash await) has been very slow for years.
     
  7. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    I found a guy that had some, but sold out. Aluminum version (Nasbar's were steel inserts).

    Dyna-Drive...that was the model name for the line of pedals shimaNO developed and abandoned. I had to Google that one! It's been way too many years!
     
  8. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    To the OP:

    "Dont sell" [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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