Would restoration of a 90's Miyata road bike be worth it for a novice rider?

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by nycstripes, May 30, 2013.

  1. nycstripes

    nycstripes New Member

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    I have a Miyata road bike hanging from a hook in my garage for quite a while. I recently got the riding bug and have been riding my Klein Mantra on the street for exercise. I love window shopping for the current road bikes out there but some of them are way out of my price range at the moment.

    I was wondering if restoring an older bike would be worth it until I can buy a modern bike later on.

    Would the cost of the upgrade to restore the bike cost too much? Not looking for Carbon Fiber wheels but id like the bike to be up to date as possible.

    thanks
    This isn't my bike but its very similar.
    [​IMG]
     
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  2. daveryanwyoming

    daveryanwyoming Well-Known Member

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    Restoring the bike makes perfect sense, upgrading an older bike...not so much.

    IOW, replace the brake and shifter cables and housings, the tires, the chain, the brake pads, the bar tape and maybe the pedals to something newer and you've got a very nice bike to log some miles on. But going down the path of trying to modernize components is usually just a way to spend a lot of cash and not end up with a modern bike in the end.

    For instance your Miyata almost certainly has a 126mm rear triangle and wheels designed to fit that spacing. No big deal squeezing a modern 130mm hub into a steel rear triangle but now if you want to upgrade to modern 10 speed shifters you're also talking about new wheels in addition to a cassette, derailleurs, chain, shifters and perhaps cranks. That's a lot of parts to throw on the bike to pick up a few gears. Pretty much any upgrade path you start down with the possible exception of things like the saddle or the pedals runs to that same slippery slope of changing out a bunch of stuff for marginal gains.

    Restoring it would be very cool and not too expensive and you'll end up with a very nice bike that can go fast and go long and handle a lot of conditions. That's the path I'd take and then if you really want a newer bike with things like integrated brake/shifters up on the bars and 10 speeds then save money until that becomes a reality and you'll still have the Miyata for riding in crummy weather or for mounting up with some cyclocross knobbies (love those cantilever brakes for big tire clearance) and riding on dirt and gravel trails.

    Good luck,
    -Dave
     
  3. nycstripes

    nycstripes New Member

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    Thanks for the input. I will look into getting some new equipment for the bike.
     
  4. daveryanwyoming

    daveryanwyoming Well-Known Member

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    BTW, you should clean and regrease all major bearings as well which include: hubs, bottom bracket and headset. That and the changes mentioned above is pretty much a complete overhaul.

    -Dave
     
  5. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    First, there is a difference between restoring & updating ... and, for the moment, I am going to presume that you actually meant updating ...

    FWIW. I am in the camp which not only thinks it is good to update frames with contemporary components, but I also feel that it does not need to cost as much as many other people think.

    While I presume that your 90s vintage Miyata has 700c wheels, it really doesn't matter if the bike has 27" wheels.

    If the bike is currently roadworthy, then beyond the suggested re-lubing of the moving parts, if you can DIY & if you are a wise shopper (i.e., eBay) then you only need to spend about $200(US) to update the components (you CAN spend much more, of course) ...

    Allowing that the bike's rear wheel may have a Freewheel, then it CAN be used but I would replace it with a 7-speed SunRace Freewheel ($20-to-$30, depending on where you buy it) BECAUSE the Cogs on a SunRace's Freewheel will be ramped ...

    • ramped Cogs are a good thing ...

    A pair of Campagnolo shifters (< $150) + a Shimano rear derailleur ($30+) can be indexed to mate with a variety of Cog spacings ...
    [​IMG]

    IMO, 7-speed & 8-speed indexing is close enough to be considered to be the same ...

    The shifters typically come with downtube cable stops ... if not, then they are typically available for between $10-to-$20 on eBay ... sometimes, less.

    If you ask your LBS to do the transformation/updating, then expect to pay between $300-and-$400, or more!

    Tires/tubes, if needed, will add to the cost, of course.

    FYI. Campagnolo shifters can be used with almost ANY front derailleur + Double crankset ... shifting on a Triple is not a problem with a most of the pre-2009 Campagnolo shifters ... maybe/maybe-not with the newer Campagnolo shifters.

    The Campagnolo-Shimano combination yields superior shifting (well, I suppose that some people could adjust their derailleurs improperly & subsequently have dodgy shifting) ...

    Of course, if you opt for either Shimano or SRAM shifters, then you will probably need to anticipate making a wholesale replacement of almost all the other components, too ... at that point, the cost could seem less than ideal.
     
  6. nycstripes

    nycstripes New Member

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    Thanks for the information. Much appreciated.
     
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