Wrapping Drop Bars

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Gary Kamieneski, Apr 22, 2003.

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  1. I've been wrapping road bars with Cinelli cork for years. Recently, I've seen some conflicting
    information regarding the direction of the wrapping from the ends to the center of the bars.

    The Park Tools website advocates wrapping counterclockwise on the right and clockwise on the
    left, when observed from behind the bicycle. Barnett's manual and the Cinelli package does the
    opposite, wrapping to the outside on both sides of the bar, clockwise on the right,
    counterclockwise on the left.

    Oddly, reasons given for both methods are to avoid the tape unravelling, but obviously one method
    has to be better than another. Care to comment?
     
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  2. Alex Graham

    Alex Graham Guest

    Gary Kamieneski wrote:
    > I've been wrapping road bars with Cinelli cork for years. Recently, I've seen some conflicting
    > information regarding the direction of the wrapping from the ends to the center of the bars.
    >
    > The Park Tools website advocates wrapping counterclockwise on the right and clockwise on the
    > left, when observed from behind the bicycle. Barnett's manual and the Cinelli package does the
    > opposite, wrapping to the outside on both sides of the bar, clockwise on the right,
    > counterclockwise on the left.
    >
    > Oddly, reasons given for both methods are to avoid the tape unravelling, but obviously one method
    > has to be better than another. Care to comment?

    Dunno about anyone else, but I wrap from the middle down to the brake levers, and from the ends up
    to the brake levers. Its a bit more tricky, but it means you dont turn up the sides of the tape with
    your hands when riding the tops/sides.

    --

    -Alex

    ----------------------------------
    [email protected]

    http://alexpg.ath.cx:3353/cycling.php http://www.westerleycycling.org.uk
    ----------------------------------
     
  3. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Gary Kamieneski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've been wrapping road bars with Cinelli cork for years. Recently, I've seen some conflicting
    > information regarding the direction of the wrapping from the ends to the center of the bars.
    >
    > The Park Tools website advocates wrapping counterclockwise on the right and clockwise on the
    > left, when observed from behind the bicycle. Barnett's manual and the Cinelli package does the
    > opposite, wrapping to the outside on both sides of the bar, clockwise on the right,
    > counterclockwise on the left.
    >
    > Oddly, reasons given for both methods are to avoid the tape unravelling, but obviously one method
    > has to be better than another. Care to comment?

    I read somewhere that you should wrap towards the bike, starting at the bottom. Seems to work, but
    if you wanna go the other way, it should work just as well... The difference will probably be around
    the brake levers.

    Mike
     
  4. H. Guy

    H. Guy Guest

    > The Park Tools website advocates wrapping counterclockwise on the right and clockwise on the
    > left, when observed from behind the bicycle. Barnett's manual and the Cinelli package does the
    > opposite, wrapping to the outside on both sides of the bar, clockwise on the right,
    > counterclockwise on the left.
    >
    > Oddly, reasons given for both methods are to avoid the tape unravelling, but obviously one method
    > has to be better than another. Care to comment?

    i've always done things the cinelli way (though i didn't know it was the cinelli way...). my
    reasoning (and let me state here that i am NOT an engineer, i don't CLAIM to be an engineer, i never
    WANTED to be an engineer and i can't correct GRAMMAR like an engineer) is that the force i'm likely
    to put on the tape is more perpendicular to the edges of the tape that way. should reduce tape creep
    and probably reduces those nasty cork cuts my sensitive skin gets when rubbing against the sharp
    edges of the tape. (NOT REALLY.)

    does it make a difference? dunno. probably works equally well both ways, but after riding on cinelli
    tape done this way for, um, 20 years or so, i'm sure it'd bug me to change.
     
  5. Harris

    Harris Guest

    Gary Kamieneski <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I've been wrapping road bars with Cinelli cork for years. Recently, I've seen some conflicting
    > information regarding the direction of the wrapping from the ends to the center of the bars.

    > The Park Tools website advocates wrapping counterclockwise on the right and clockwise on the
    > left, when observed from behind the bicycle. Barnett's manual and the Cinelli package does the
    > opposite, wrapping to the outside on both sides of the bar, clockwise on the right,
    > counterclockwise on the left.

    > Oddly, reasons given for both methods are to avoid the tape unravelling, but obviously one method
    > has to be better than another. Care to comment?

    CW or CCW can be confusing depending on where you're standing. What you want is for the tape to
    overlap like roof shingles along the top of the bar such that when your hands slide toward the brake
    levers they won't peel up the tape. As long as you wrap from the ends toward the middle, you will be
    ok whether you start CW or CCW. But for symetry, if you start CW on the left, then do the opposite
    on the right.

    Art "anti-clockwise" Harris
     
  6. Gary Kamieneski wrote:

    > I've been wrapping road bars with Cinelli cork for years. Recently, I've seen some conflicting
    > information regarding the direction of the wrapping from the ends to the center of the bars.
    >
    > The Park Tools website advocates wrapping counterclockwise on the right and clockwise on the
    > left, when observed from behind the bicycle. Barnett's manual and the Cinelli package does the
    > opposite, wrapping to the outside on both sides of the bar, clockwise on the right,
    > counterclockwise on the left.
    >
    > Oddly, reasons given for both methods are to avoid the tape unravelling, but obviously one method
    > has to be better than another. Care to comment?

    it depends on the 'style' you want. for a 'standard' rap i start on the drop and rap towards the
    center. taping starts on the bottom of the bar and comes out, over, in and under (that way you don't
    need CW/CCW). as long as you go around the hoods the same way (and i'm not going to try to describe
    it) the tape will go from the bottom forward up and over the bar. the reason i rap this direction is
    it tends to tighten the tape when ridden, you tend to twist the tape inward. it does leave the up
    edge exposed but i'm from a wet area and this adds grip to the bar on the downward slopeing parts. (
    i should explain it's a resting place *I* like - hands outward just above the hoods.)

    this style has a disadvantage of curling the exposed edge after a while, by then the tape is pretty
    ratty anyway. a smoother effect can be had by starting at the stem ( again from the bottom forward,
    over,to the rear and down).

    another way to tape is a 'weave' you use 2 pieces of tape per side (different colors if you wish) -
    not Even going to try to explain that one!

    how you go over the hoods is an art! some like a figure 8, but if the tape is thick it really makes
    the hoods Fat. this is best with cloth tape not cork. i usealy use a small piece as filler for the
    back of the bar (hides the hoodclamp) and rap from the outside-front-bottom, up over the hood to the
    front and around the bar from the front inside. this lease a small peice of hood exposed to the
    inside but uses the least tape for the most coverage. that can be needed on a wide bar with the
    inexpencive tape you barely get enough tape anyway.
     
  7. Matt Locker

    Matt Locker Guest

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    Looking from the saddle, wrap the left side of the bar (left hand) counterclockwise, the right side
    of the bar clockwise. Think of your hands on the drops, your palms on the bars and your fingers
    wrapped around the bar. A person tends to rotate their hands towards their fingers. This rotation
    will tend to open up the winds of bartape if not done in the correct direction.

    MOO, Matt

    Mike S. wrote:

    >"Gary Kamieneski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    >>I've been wrapping road bars with Cinelli cork for years. Recently, I've seen some conflicting
    >>information regarding the direction of the wrapping from the ends to the center of the bars.
    >>
    >>The Park Tools website advocates wrapping counterclockwise on the right and clockwise on the
    >>left, when observed from behind the bicycle. Barnett's manual and the Cinelli package does the
    >>opposite, wrapping to the outside on both sides of the bar, clockwise on the right,
    >>counterclockwise on the left.
    >>
    >>Oddly, reasons given for both methods are to avoid the tape unravelling, but obviously one method
    >>has to be better than another. Care to comment?
    >>
    >>
    >
    >I read somewhere that you should wrap towards the bike, starting at the bottom. Seems to work, but
    >if you wanna go the other way, it should work just as well... The difference will probably be
    >around the brake levers.
    >
    >Mike
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >

    --------------030001090804080502090904 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

    <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta
    http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1"> <title></title> </head> <body>
    Looking from the saddle, wrap the left side of the bar (left hand) counterclockwise, the right side
    of the bar clockwise. Think of your hands on the drops, your palms on the bars and your
    fingers wrapped around the bar. A person tends to rotate their hands towards their fingers.
    This rotation will tend to open up the winds of bartape if not done in the correct
    direction.<br> <br> MOO,<br> Matt<br> <br> Mike S. wrote:<br> <blockquote type="cite"
    cite="[email protected]"> <pre wrap="">"Gary Kamieneski" <a
    class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E"
    href="mailto:[email protected]"><[email protected]></a> wrote in message <a
    class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="news:[email protected]">news:2630-
    [email protected]</a>... </pre> <blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">I've
    been wrapping road bars with Cinelli cork for years. Recently, I've seen some conflicting
    information regarding the direction of the wrapping from the ends to the center of the bars.

    The Park Tools website advocates wrapping counterclockwise on the right and clockwise on the
    left, when observed from behind the bicycle. Barnett's manual and the Cinelli package does the
    opposite, wrapping to the outside on both sides of the bar, clockwise on the right,
    counterclockwise on the left.

    Oddly, reasons given for both methods are to avoid the tape unravelling, but obviously one method
    has to be better than another. Care to comment? </pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap=""><!----> I read
    somewhere that you should wrap towards the bike, starting at the bottom. Seems to work, but if you
    wanna go the other way, it should work just as well... The difference will probably be around the
    brake levers.

    Mike

    </pre> </blockquote> <br> </body> </html>

    --------------030001090804080502090904--
     
  8. "H. Guy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > The Park Tools website advocates wrapping counterclockwise on the right and clockwise on the
    > > left, when observed from behind the bicycle. Barnett's manual and the Cinelli package does the
    > > opposite, wrapping to the outside on both sides of the bar, clockwise on the right,
    > > counterclockwise on the left.
    > >
    > > Oddly, reasons given for both methods are to avoid the tape unravelling, but obviously one
    > > method has to be better than another. Care to comment?
    >
    > i've always done things the cinelli way (though i didn't know it was the cinelli way...). my
    > reasoning (and let me state here that i am NOT an engineer, i don't CLAIM to be an engineer, i
    > never WANTED to be an engineer and i can't correct GRAMMAR like an engineer) is that the force i'm
    > likely to put on the tape is more perpendicular to the edges of the tape that way. should reduce
    > tape creep and probably reduces those nasty cork cuts my sensitive skin gets when rubbing against
    > the sharp edges of the tape. (NOT REALLY.)
    >
    > does it make a difference? dunno. probably works equally well both ways, but after riding on
    > cinelli tape done this way for, um, 20 years or so, i'm sure it'd bug me to change.

    Interesting have been the responses. I only brought it up because recently I've seen this addressed
    on a lot of sites. Funny, on one they did it the Park Tools way, but stated "just like on the
    Cinelli box", which of course, is just the opposite. Myself, I think they really might be something
    to wrapping both sides over the top to the inside. That way, when you pull back on the tops while
    climbing, it really does "tighten" the wind.
     
  9. "Gary Kamieneski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > obviously one method has to be better than another. Care to comment?

    It's not obvious to me why one method has to be better than another. Why is that?

    JT

    --
    *******************************************
    NB: reply-to address is munged

    Visit http://www.jt10000.com
    *******************************************
     
  10. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "John Forrest Tomlinson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Gary Kamieneski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > obviously one method has to be better than another. Care to comment?
    >
    > It's not obvious to me why one method has to be better than another. Why is that?
    >
    Well, you see, if there are two methods, one has to be better. May not be by much, but one method
    may cause less to go wrong over the long term, etc.

    But, if you live in the southern hemisphere, you need to wrap opposite the way those of us in the
    northern hemisphere do. There's something about the coriolis forces that causes things to be
    backwards. Just look at what it did to the roads...

    Mike
     
  11. "Mike S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > Well, you see, if there are two methods, .one has to be better. May not be by much, but one method
    > may cause less to go wrong over the long term, etc.

    I am not sure if you are joking. In case you are not, what you said is not true. Sometimes
    differences are insignificant.

    JT

    --
    *******************************************
    NB: reply-to address is munged

    Visit http://www.jt10000.com
    *******************************************
     
  12. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    As sitting on the bicycle, I wrap the tape from the inside of the bar outward. That means clockwise
    on right side. On the tops, I wind the tape away from me. I use a piece of back tape at the hood.
    The stuff seems to stay put and I prefer tape w/o glue on it.

    There is another trick. I buy 2 tapings of the same tape. The tape wears from the lever to the
    straight part of the bar. In my case, just at the hood and tape interface. I cut the tape where it
    crosses the lever under the hood and stick the lower end down with Crazy glue. I take ½ roll of the
    2nd box of tape, glue the end at the cut and wind as usual. With 2 boxes of tape, you can get 5
    tapings. Most useful if you like light colored tape.
     
  13. > "Mike S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>Well, you see, if there are two methods, .one has to be better. May not be by much, but one method
    >>may cause less to go wrong over the long term, etc.

    I always go out and under, i.e. clockwise on the left, widdershins on the right.

    My rationale for this is that the end of the tape, at the middle of the bar, is coming over the bar
    toward the rider. If the rider is in time-trial mode, pulling on the bar near the middle, the
    direction of pull will tend to tighten, rather than loosen the tape.

    I consider this to be a matter of importance about equal to my practice of always crimping cable end
    caps in line with the airflow for improved aerodynamics, i.e. virtually none.

    John Forrest Tomlinson wrote:

    > I am not sure if you are joking. In case you are not, what you said is not true. Sometimes
    > differences are insignificant.

    Yep. What is important is to standardize on which way you do it, lest you fall into the error of
    doing one side one way and t'other side t'other.

    Sheldon "Always Glad Of A Chance To Write 'Widdershins'--No Magazine Editor Would EVER Let Me Do
    That!" Brown +--------------------------------------------------------------------+
    | ...Which two mighty powers powers have...been engaged in a most | obstinate war for six and
    | thirty moons past. It began upon the | following occasion. It is allowed on all hands, that the |
    | primitive way of breaking eggs before we eat them, was upon the | large end; but his present
    | Majesty's grandfather, while he was a | boy, going to eat an egg, and breaking it according to
    | the | ancient practice, happened to cut one of his fingers. Whereupon | the Emperor his father
    | published an edict, commanding all his | subjects, upon great penalties, to break the smaller end
    | of their | eggs. The people so highly resented this law, that our histories | tell us there have
    | been six rebellions raised on that account; | wherein one Emperor lost his life, and another his
    | crown...It is | computed, that eleven thousand persons have...suffered death, | rather than
    | submit to break their eggs at the smaller end. Many | hundred large volumes have been published
    | upon this controversy...| --Jonathan Swift |
    +--------------------------------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton,
    Massachusetts Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts
    shipped Worldwide http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  14. Sheldon Brown wrote:

    >
    > Sheldon "Always Glad Of A Chance To Write 'Widdershins'--No Magazine Editor Would EVER Let Me Do
    > That!" Brown

    Why not try an occult magazine? Surely you could do a piece on the black art of cyclemaintenance. I
    believe they will be most sympathetic ;)
    --
    Marten
     
  15. Art Harris

    Art Harris Guest

    James Connell wrote:
    > for a 'standard' rap i start on the drop and rap towards the center. taping starts on the bottom
    > of the bar and comes out, over, in and under (that way you don't need CW/CCW).

    <snip>

    > it does leave the up edge exposed but i'm from a wet area and this adds grip to the bar on the
    > downward slopeing parts.

    I can't picture this. If you're wrapping from the bottom up, the "up edges" should be covered by the
    next wind of the tape (until you get to the center where you use electrical tape to secure the end).

    Art Harris
     
  16. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On Wed, 23 Apr 2003 03:19:42 GMT, Sheldon Brown <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I always go out and under, i.e. clockwise on the left, widdershins on the right.

    Wouldn't that make it deasil on the left?

    >Sheldon "Always Glad Of A Chance To Write 'Widdershins'--No Magazine Editor Would EVER Let Me Do
    >That!" Brown

    John "Always Glad Of A Chance To Learn Two New Words" Everett

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  17. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    Alex Graham <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > Dunno about anyone else, but I wrap from the middle down to the brake levers, and from the ends up
    > to the brake levers. Its a bit more tricky, but it means you dont turn up the sides of the tape
    > with your hands when riding the tops/sides.

    The very first time I wrapped a set of bars with cloth tape I did exactly this, and found that
    within a few miles the edges of the tape on the bend of the tops began to curl down. Within a few
    days the edges in the drops began to curl up. Since then I always wrapped cloth tape in 4 pieces
    starting at the levers and working towards the bar ends or the middle of the tops. The edges of
    modern tapes are much stiffer and I find that using 2 pieces, starting at the bar ends and finishing
    at the tops is fine.

    --
    Dave...
     
  18. Wouldn't know. Mine have been laced on leather since '85

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
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