WTB: Mountain bike reccommendations please

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Kalico, Sep 9, 2004.

  1. Kalico

    Kalico Guest

    WTB: Mountain bike reccommendations please

    I have about £300 to spend.

    Any advice about what to look for in a first mountain bike?

    I've been looking at Giant and Trek though not sure which is the
    better brand. I've also been told just to get front suspension and
    not rear, since it will be crap at this price point. True?

    Thanks for any help.
    Rob


    Replace 'spam' with 'org' to reply
     
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  2. Badger_South

    Badger_South Guest

    On Thu, 09 Sep 2004 10:55:36 +0100, Kalico <[email protected]> wrote:

    >WTB: Mountain bike reccommendations please
    >
    >I have about £300 to spend.
    >
    >Any advice about what to look for in a first mountain bike?
    >
    >I've been looking at Giant and Trek though not sure which is the
    >better brand. I've also been told just to get front suspension and
    >not rear, since it will be crap at this price point. True?
    >
    >Thanks for any help.
    >Rob
    >
    >
    >Replace 'spam' with 'org' to reply


    What kind of terrain and location, generally do you plan to ride it?

    -B
     
  3. Kalico

    Kalico Guest

    On Thu, 09 Sep 2004 09:38:47 -0400, Badger_South <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Thu, 09 Sep 2004 10:55:36 +0100, Kalico <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>WTB: Mountain bike reccommendations please
    >>
    >>I have about £300 to spend.
    >>
    >>Any advice about what to look for in a first mountain bike?
    >>
    >>I've been looking at Giant and Trek though not sure which is the
    >>better brand. I've also been told just to get front suspension and
    >>not rear, since it will be crap at this price point. True?
    >>
    >>Thanks for any help.
    >>Rob
    >>
    >>
    >>Replace 'spam' with 'org' to reply

    >
    >What kind of terrain and location, generally do you plan to ride it?
    >
    >-B
    >

    I am planning to ride mainly trails I think. I'm really not sure of
    the terminology since I am new to this, having hired a mountain bike
    only a few times in the Derbyshire and Scotland.

    I do have experience road riding for many years although I'm now a bit
    rusty.

    One thing that does concern me is size. I am 6'2" so what frame size
    would you recommend?

    TIA
    Rob


    Replace 'spam' with 'org' to reply
     
  4. Badger_South

    Badger_South Guest

    On Thu, 09 Sep 2004 21:34:12 +0100, Kalico <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 09 Sep 2004 09:38:47 -0400, Badger_South <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>On Thu, 09 Sep 2004 10:55:36 +0100, Kalico <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>WTB: Mountain bike reccommendations please
    >>>
    >>>I have about £300 to spend.
    >>>
    >>>Any advice about what to look for in a first mountain bike?
    >>>
    >>>I've been looking at Giant and Trek though not sure which is the
    >>>better brand. I've also been told just to get front suspension and
    >>>not rear, since it will be crap at this price point. True?
    >>>
    >>>Thanks for any help.
    >>>Rob
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Replace 'spam' with 'org' to reply

    >>
    >>What kind of terrain and location, generally do you plan to ride it?
    >>
    >>-B
    >>

    >I am planning to ride mainly trails I think. I'm really not sure of
    >the terminology since I am new to this, having hired a mountain bike
    >only a few times in the Derbyshire and Scotland.
    >
    >I do have experience road riding for many years although I'm now a bit
    >rusty.
    >
    >One thing that does concern me is size. I am 6'2" so what frame size
    >would you recommend?
    >
    >TIA
    >Rob


    I would recommend you go to your local bike shop (LBS) and tell them you
    plan to ride trails, and they will recommend a bike within your range. Some
    shops may try and sell you a slightly smaller frame than you require, so
    I'd advise you test ride one size larger. Test ride several bikes, even one
    that might not be in your current stated range to get a feel for what
    appeals to you. Don't be in a huge hurry to purchase.

    Any of the Trek hard tails should work just fine for your purpose.

    -B
     
  5. Kalico

    Kalico Guest

    On Thu, 09 Sep 2004 16:40:42 -0400, Badger_South <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    [snip]

    >I would recommend you go to your local bike shop (LBS) and tell them you
    >plan to ride trails, and they will recommend a bike within your range. Some
    >shops may try and sell you a slightly smaller frame than you require, so
    >I'd advise you test ride one size larger. Test ride several bikes, even one
    >that might not be in your current stated range to get a feel for what
    >appeals to you. Don't be in a huge hurry to purchase.
    >
    >Any of the Trek hard tails should work just fine for your purpose.
    >
    >-B
    >

    Thanks for that Badger. So can I assume Trek is a good brand? Better
    than, say, Giant? Or about the same?

    Cheers
    Rob


    Replace 'spam' with 'org' to reply
     
  6. Badger_South

    Badger_South Guest

    On Thu, 09 Sep 2004 22:17:44 +0100, Kalico <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 09 Sep 2004 16:40:42 -0400, Badger_South <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >[snip]
    >
    >>I would recommend you go to your local bike shop (LBS) and tell them you
    >>plan to ride trails, and they will recommend a bike within your range. Some
    >>shops may try and sell you a slightly smaller frame than you require, so
    >>I'd advise you test ride one size larger. Test ride several bikes, even one
    >>that might not be in your current stated range to get a feel for what
    >>appeals to you. Don't be in a huge hurry to purchase.
    >>
    >>Any of the Trek hard tails should work just fine for your purpose.
    >>
    >>-B
    >>

    >Thanks for that Badger. So can I assume Trek is a good brand? Better
    >than, say, Giant? Or about the same?
    >
    >Cheers
    >Rob


    They are similar - Trek touts having a better warranty, and US
    construction. Again, test ride both, and rather than going by price
    (they're typically within $50bucks), go with the LBS that gives you better
    service or a better gut reaction. The only overt problem with Giant, imo,
    is that they only have three frame sizes, whereas Trek has several.

    -B
     
  7. VBadJuJu

    VBadJuJu Guest

    Kalico <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 09 Sep 2004 09:38:47 -0400, Badger_South <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>On Thu, 09 Sep 2004 10:55:36 +0100, Kalico <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>WTB: Mountain bike reccommendations please
    >>>
    >>>I have about £300 to spend.
    >>>
    >>>Any advice about what to look for in a first mountain bike?
    >>>
    >>>I've been looking at Giant and Trek though not sure which is the
    >>>better brand. I've also been told just to get front suspension and
    >>>not rear, since it will be crap at this price point. True?
    >>>
    >>>Thanks for any help.
    >>>Rob
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Replace 'spam' with 'org' to reply

    >>
    >>What kind of terrain and location, generally do you plan to ride it?
    >>
    >>-B
    >>

    >I am planning to ride mainly trails I think. I'm really not sure of
    >the terminology since I am new to this, having hired a mountain bike
    >only a few times in the Derbyshire and Scotland.


    For trails and paths, you don't really need the rear suspension. All
    it would do is absorb some of the energy you might prefer to go into
    propulsion.

    >
    >I do have experience road riding for many years although I'm now a bit
    >rusty.
    >
    >One thing that does concern me is size. I am 6'2" so what frame size
    >would you recommend?


    I am about the same height and 21inches (~ 53 cm) is just right for
    me. But do test ride the next smaller and larger ones for feel as
    Badger suggests.

    The one caution I would have or add is based on your size. If you
    ride much, the weight which can go along with our height can be hell
    on some of the parts namely the chain, cassette and hub. The chain
    and cassette can be upgraded after you wear them out after 1000 miles.

    The hub is a bigger issue. I had a Trek 3700 which after as little as
    120 miles (basically weekly) the internal rear hub parts would come
    loose and the wheel would wobble. It was within the first 12 months
    and Trek was willing to replace the wheel, but I opted to trade it in
    for a 2005 4500).

    I was told (and it seems to make sense) that based on my size and
    frequency of use, a double wall wheel/rim would help because it helps
    distribute torque better thereby reducing it on the hub.

    Even if your size/frequency of use dont present the same problem, a
    better wheel woulnt hurt as to reduced maintenance, resale value,
    durability etc.

    YMMV

    >
    >TIA
    >Rob
    >
    >
    >Replace 'spam' with 'org' to reply
     
  8. Kalico

    Kalico Guest

    [snip]
    >for a 2005 4500).
    >
    >I was told (and it seems to make sense) that based on my size and
    >frequency of use, a double wall wheel/rim would help because it helps
    >distribute torque better thereby reducing it on the hub.
    >
    >Even if your size/frequency of use dont present the same problem, a
    >better wheel woulnt hurt as to reduced maintenance, resale value,
    >durability etc.
    >
    >YMMV
    >>


    Thanks for that. Can I just ask what a double wall is?

    Replace 'spam' with 'org' to reply
     
  9. VBadJuJu

    VBadJuJu Guest

    Kalico <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>I was told (and it seems to make sense) that based on my size and
    >>frequency of use, a double wall wheel/rim would help because it helps
    >>distribute torque better thereby reducing it on the hub.
    >>
    >>Even if your size/frequency of use dont present the same problem, a
    >>better wheel woulnt hurt as to reduced maintenance, resale value,
    >>durability etc.
    >>
    >>YMMV
    >>>

    >
    >Thanks for that. Can I just ask what a double wall is?


    Instead of just a rim where the spokes attach directly to it, there is
    the external/visible rim, but the spokes go thru that to connect to a
    second/internal rim. That way, the torque or energy is distributed
    across the inner rim then to the main/external rim and both support
    each other rather than focused at a single point.
     
  10. wee jimmy

    wee jimmy Guest

    buy a specialised bike for the money their great iv just spent £1750
    on 1 but its great
     
  11. wee jimmy

    wee jimmy Guest

    buy a specialised bike for the money their great iv just spent £1750
    on 1 but its great
     
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