WTD: Tamdem Richmond cycle



E

elyob

Guest
I promised a mate that I'd take him around the Tamsin Trail or similar on a
tamdem.

I know that a tamdem is tough, but he reminded me this weekend, my promise.

OK, he's blind, ok, I've never ridden a tamdem.

Any advice, please email me on [email protected] ... thanks :)

Nick
 
D

David Martin

Guest
elyob wrote:
> I promised a mate that I'd take him around the Tamsin Trail or similar on a
> tamdem.
>
> I know that a tamdem is tough, but he reminded me this weekend, my promise.
>
> OK, he's blind, ok, I've never ridden a tamdem.
>
> Any advice, please email me on [email protected] ... thanks :)


Lesson 1. The stoker is always right.
Lesson 2. It isn't as scary as you might think.

My reccommendation is that you try the tandem on your own first. You'll
discover how large a turning circle it has and just what it feels like.

Then when it comes to your friend, you straddle teh tandem and hold it
upright while your friend gets on and clips in. It is then up to you to
start/stop etc and they should keep their feet on the pedals unless you
tell them otherwise.

Works a treat. Enjoy ;-)

...d
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
David Martin wrote:
>
> My reccommendation is that you try the tandem on your own first. You'll
> discover how large a turning circle it has and just what it feels like.
>


I would add to that to also try it with a sighted stoker of a similar
weight to your friend until you are totally comfortable. A tandem with
stoker handles very differently to a solo bike, particularly with weight
shifts by the stoker and they will not feel confident on the back if you
have not got used to it and in control.


--
Tony

"The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
right."
- Lord Hailsham
 
B

bugbear

Guest
Tony Raven wrote:
> David Martin wrote:
>
>>
>> My reccommendation is that you try the tandem on your own first. You'll
>> discover how large a turning circle it has and just what it feels like.
>>

>
> I would add to that to also try it with a sighted stoker of a similar
> weight to your friend until you are totally comfortable. A tandem with
> stoker handles very differently to a solo bike, particularly with weight
> shifts by the stoker and they will not feel confident on the back if you
> have not got used to it and in control.


I'd start by riding the tandem solo. The extra wheelbase
length is quite disconcerting.

BugBear (with a tandem and a tandem trike)
 
E

elyob

Guest
"bugbear" <[email protected]_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Tony Raven wrote:
>> David Martin wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> My reccommendation is that you try the tandem on your own first. You'll
>>> discover how large a turning circle it has and just what it feels like.
>>>

>>
>> I would add to that to also try it with a sighted stoker of a similar
>> weight to your friend until you are totally comfortable. A tandem with
>> stoker handles very differently to a solo bike, particularly with weight
>> shifts by the stoker and they will not feel confident on the back if you
>> have not got used to it and in control.

>
> I'd start by riding the tandem solo. The extra wheelbase
> length is quite disconcerting.
>
> BugBear (with a tandem and a tandem trike)


I've ridden motorbikes with a pillion, so hopefully that'll be enough to
learn how to ride one with a few minutes to handle the peculiarities.

Now, where can I hire one from?

Thanks again
 
P

p.k.

Guest
elyob wrote:
> I promised a mate that I'd take him around the Tamsin Trail or
> similar on a tamdem.
>
> I know that a tamdem is tough, but he reminded me this weekend, my
> promise.
> OK, he's blind, ok, I've never ridden a tamdem.
>
> Any advice, please email me on [email protected] ... thanks :)
>
> Nick


do you have access to a tendem or do you need to borrow one?

A mate (in wimbledon) has a MTB tandem that knows its own way round the
Tamsin Trail!



pk
 
J

John Hearns

Guest
On Tue, 22 Nov 2005 14:09:59 +0000, elyob wrote:

>
> I've ridden motorbikes with a pillion, so hopefully that'll be enough to
> learn how to ride one with a few minutes to handle the peculiarities.
>
> Now, where can I hire one from?


Not an answer to your question,
but London Recumbents in Dulwich/Battersea parks have different types
of bike for hire.
Could do worse than give them a phone.
 
B

Bob Watkinson

Guest

> My reccommendation is that you try the tandem on your own first.


This might scare the OP. Riding a tandem solo can feel very jittery whereas
with two up it feels fine. I hate riding mine solo and it's a decent bike
(Dawes Galaxy Twin)

JD cycles (Ilkley) well let you borrow one for a couple of hours to see how
you get on with it.
 
D

David Martin

Guest
Bob Watkinson wrote:
> > My reccommendation is that you try the tandem on your own first.

>
> This might scare the OP. Riding a tandem solo can feel very jittery whereas
> with two up it feels fine. I hate riding mine solo and it's a decent bike
> (Dawes Galaxy Twin)


Wheras mine isn't a decent bike but it feels fine solo. Or at least no
worse than when loaded.

...d
 
B

bugbear

Guest
Bob Watkinson wrote:
>>My reccommendation is that you try the tandem on your own first.

>
>
> This might scare the OP. Riding a tandem solo can feel very jittery whereas
> with two up it feels fine. I hate riding mine solo and it's a decent bike
> (Dawes Galaxy Twin)


OK. I guess we differ on that. My tandem is quite happy
being ridden solo; it's ceratinly not "jitery"

It's much heavier (and I find harder
to handle) 2 up.

It's a Claud Butler Majestic Twin - nothing fancy.

BugBeasr
 
B

Bob Watkinson

Guest
"bugbear" <[email protected]_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Bob Watkinson wrote:
>>>My reccommendation is that you try the tandem on your own first.

>>
>>
>> This might scare the OP. Riding a tandem solo can feel very jittery
>> whereas with two up it feels fine. I hate riding mine solo and it's a
>> decent bike (Dawes Galaxy Twin)

>
> OK. I guess we differ on that. My tandem is quite happy
> being ridden solo; it's ceratinly not "jitery"
>
> It's much heavier (and I find harder
> to handle) 2 up.
>
> It's a Claud Butler Majestic Twin - nothing fancy.
>
> BugBeasr


Come to think of it I've probably had panniers on the back when I've tried
it. That's probably what does it
 
E

elyob

Guest
"p.k." <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> elyob wrote:
>> I promised a mate that I'd take him around the Tamsin Trail or
>> similar on a tamdem.
>>
>> I know that a tamdem is tough, but he reminded me this weekend, my
>> promise.
>> OK, he's blind, ok, I've never ridden a tamdem.
>>
>> Any advice, please email me on [email protected] ... thanks :)
>>
>> Nick

>
> do you have access to a tendem or do you need to borrow one?
>
> A mate (in wimbledon) has a MTB tandem that knows its own way round the
> Tamsin Trail!


I'm hoping to get access to one ... your mate in Wimbledon .. can he be my
mate too?!
 
D

daren

Guest
Has _he_ ridden a tandem?

Lesson 1) ride alone, my two tandems don't really behave that
differently to a slow-steering solo.
Lesson 2) mount and straddle, hold bike upright on inner thigh and
rotate hips to brace saddle.
Lesson 3) Stoker mounts and places feet on pedals/in straps/clips in.
Lesson 4) Big push from stoker and lift yourself up onto saddle
Lesson 5) Find nearest downhill :-
Lesson 6) Inform stoker of everything, especially bumps. He should lift
out of saddle prior to bump, but obviously won't be able to see them
first.

Remember you balance the whole tandem with YOUR shoulders, so keep them
LOOSE. Tandems aren't tough, but these days my stokers are a lot
smaller :)

regards
daren.
 
S

Sandy Morton

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
daren <[email protected]> wrote:
> Lesson 1) ride alone, my two tandems don't really behave that
> differently to a slow-steering solo. Lesson 2) mount and straddle,
> hold bike upright on inner thigh and rotate hips to brace saddle.
> Lesson 3) Stoker mounts and places feet on pedals/in straps/clips
> in. Lesson 4) Big push from stoker and lift yourself up onto saddle
> Lesson 5) Find nearest downhill :- Lesson 6) Inform stoker of
> everything, especially bumps. He should lift out of saddle prior to
> bump, but obviously won't be able to see them first.


> Remember you balance the whole tandem with YOUR shoulders, so keep
> them LOOSE. Tandems aren't tough, but these days my stokers are a
> lot smaller :)


Very good advice - I've taken the liberty of printing it out for
customers.

The only one which I would add and it may not be relevant this time
is - don't try to steer.

--
A T (Sandy) Morton
on the Bicycle Island
In the Global Village
http://www.millport.net
 
D

David Martin

Guest
Sandy Morton wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> daren <[email protected]> wrote:
> > Lesson 1) ride alone, my two tandems don't really behave that
> > differently to a slow-steering solo. Lesson 2) mount and straddle,
> > hold bike upright on inner thigh and rotate hips to brace saddle.
> > Lesson 3) Stoker mounts and places feet on pedals/in straps/clips
> > in. Lesson 4) Big push from stoker and lift yourself up onto saddle
> > Lesson 5) Find nearest downhill :- Lesson 6) Inform stoker of
> > everything, especially bumps. He should lift out of saddle prior to
> > bump, but obviously won't be able to see them first.

>
> > Remember you balance the whole tandem with YOUR shoulders, so keep
> > them LOOSE. Tandems aren't tough, but these days my stokers are a
> > lot smaller :)

>
> Very good advice - I've taken the liberty of printing it out for
> customers.
>
> The only one which I would add and it may not be relevant this time
> is - don't try to steer.


You've not bid on the quadruplet then?

...d