WTFOT: GR (geek report): finaly got Linux Mandrake 9

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Technician, May 19, 2003.

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  1. Technician

    Technician Guest

    Ok, i know this is way off-topic (or Way The Fu** Off-Topic as the subject suggests), but for some
    reason my news server has dropped alt.os.linux.mandrake, either permanently, or temporarily. so
    anyway, i just felt like posting somewhere. if nothing else, the other geeks of the group may
    appreciate this.

    I managed to get it installed over the old copy of mdk 7.2 (leaving the /home drive, untouched).
    Course, being the paranoid guy that i am, i chose the "higher" security level, only to be amused
    with the fact that shorewall essentially locked the system down. took me about 6 hours, and i think
    i have finally gotten it so it is usable again. now i just have to figure out why SSH is blocking my
    workstation from connecting (firewall allows it. really quite annoying as the server monitor sucks
    and keeps flickering, and i want to get the server back into the closet where it belongs). that and
    get X set so it loads Gnome and not memory gulping KDE (forgot how as it is not something i do
    frequently).

    I have noticed several new things. for one, wget has a new look, and i like it. it may just be my
    security setting, but it now restricts root logins so i won't be tempted to login and possibly
    disclose the root password. though i can su to root after a login is established and do my thing
    (more secure i have been told). And another thing, rpm -ivv pukes out quite a bit information than
    it used to.

    Now i just have to get it so it will accept the network plan i have for
    it. i have 3 network cards. internet connection via eth0(192.168.0.0), future server farm via
    eth1(192.168.1.0) and my lan via eth2
    (192.168.2.). seems simple enough, but it just don't work
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
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  2. Dick

    Dick Guest

    > Now i just have to get it so it will accept the network plan i have for
    > it. i have 3 network cards. internet connection via eth0(192.168.0.0), future server farm via
    > eth1(192.168.1.0) and my lan via eth2
    > (192.168.2.). seems simple enough, but it just don't work

    First things first, format and install Slackware ;)
     
  3. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > Now i just have to get it so it will accept the network plan i have for
    > > it. i have 3 network cards. internet connection via eth0(192.168.0.0), future server farm via
    > > eth1(192.168.1.0) and my lan via eth2
    > > (192.168.2.). seems simple enough, but it just don't work
    >
    > First things first, format and install Slackware ;)
    >
    >
    uhh, _NO_
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  4. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Dick wrote:
    > > Now i just have to get it so it will accept the network plan i have for
    >
    >> it. i have 3 network cards. internet connection via eth0(192.168.0.0), future server farm via
    >> eth1(192.168.1.0) and my lan via eth2
    >> (192.168.2.). seems simple enough, but it just don't work
    >
    >
    > First things first, format and install Slackware ;)

    Yay for Slackware! However, not quite sure why they've jumped from 8.1 to 9.0 without any
    huge changes.

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  5. Dick

    Dick Guest

    bomba wrote:
    > Dick wrote:
    >
    >> > Now i just have to get it so it will accept the network plan i have
    >> for
    >>
    >>> it. i have 3 network cards. internet connection via eth0(192.168.0.0), future server farm via
    >>> eth1(192.168.1.0) and my lan via eth2
    >>> (192.168.2.). seems simple enough, but it just don't work
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> First things first, format and install Slackware ;)
    >
    >
    > Yay for Slackware! However, not quite sure why they've jumped from 8.1 to 9.0 without any huge
    > changes.
    >
    Well, they wouldn't want to get behind in the version number race!
     
  6. Dick

    Dick Guest

    Technician wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >> > Now i just have to get it so it will accept the network plan i have for
    >>
    >>>it. i have 3 network cards. internet connection via eth0(192.168.0.0), future server farm via
    >>> eth1(192.168.1.0) and my lan via eth2
    >>>(192.168.2.). seems simple enough, but it just don't work
    >>
    >>First things first, format and install Slackware ;)
    >>
    >>
    >
    > uhh, _NO_

    Think what you will, but if you understand the basics of linux (partitioning, file structure,
    etc...) then Slackware is very nice to work with. In general, everything just works the way it's
    supposed to. Ok, enough with the OT.
     
  7. Bruce Edge

    Bruce Edge Guest

    On Mon, 19 May 2003 10:53:39 -0400, Technician wrote:

    > Ok, i know this is way off-topic (or Way The Fu** Off-Topic as the subject suggests), but for some
    > reason my news server has dropped alt.os.linux.mandrake, either permanently, or temporarily. so
    > anyway, i just felt like posting somewhere. if nothing else, the other geeks of the group may
    > appreciate this.
    >

    I used to use Mandrake, but since I switched to debian, I've never looked back.

    -Bruce
     
  8. Drop mandick and install Slackware. Feel the slack, my friend.

    Small Black Dog
     
  9. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Technician wrote:

    > I have noticed several new things. for one, wget has a new look, and i like it. it may just be my
    > security setting, but it now restricts root logins so i won't be tempted to login and possibly
    > disclose the root password.

    That's not the reason that restriction is there. It's to stop yourself from doing a lot of damage to
    the system, as you can accidentally do when logged in as root.

    though i can su to root after a login is established and do my
    > thing (more secure i have been told). And another thing, rpm -ivv pukes out quite a bit
    > information than it used to.

    RPM's are the devil's work. Learn how to work with tarballs.

    > Now i just have to get it so it will accept the network plan i have for
    > it. i have 3 network cards. internet connection via eth0(192.168.0.0), future server farm via
    > eth1(192.168.1.0) and my lan via eth2
    > (192.168.2.). seems simple enough, but it just don't work

    "Seems simple enough?"! You're talking about setting up routing tables in a multi-homed router and
    then applying all the firewall rules and the masquerading, PAT, etc, etc. I don't think that counts
    as "simple". Anyway, you'll be wanting the advanced routing HOWTO:
    http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Adv-Routing-HOWTO/index.html
     
  10. Dick

    Dick Guest

    and it goes:
    >
    >
    >> thing (more secure i have been told). And another thing, rpm -ivv pukes out quite a bit
    >> information than it used to.
    >
    >
    > RPM's are the devil's work. Learn how to work with tarballs.
    >

    RPM's are indeed terrible. Tarballs aren't bad to work with and you'll get to know your system
    better. Slackwares and debian are the only types of packages that ever work consistantly.

    >> Now i just have to get it so it will accept the network plan i have for it. i have 3 network
    >> cards. internet connection via eth0(192.168.0.0), future server farm via eth1(192.168.1.0) and my
    >> lan via eth2
    >> (192.168.2.). seems simple enough, but it just don't work
    >
    >
    > "Seems simple enough?"! You're talking about setting up routing tables in a multi-homed router and
    > then applying all the firewall rules and the masquerading, PAT, etc, etc. I don't think that
    > counts as "simple". Anyway, you'll be wanting the advanced routing HOWTO:
    > http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Adv-Routing-HOWTO/index.html
    >
    My question is why? Seems like a lot of work for...what. Is the aim to make a router with a DMZ?
     
  11. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, myarse247 @hotmail.com says...
    > Technician wrote:
    >
    > > I have noticed several new things. for one, wget has a new look, and i like it. it may just be
    > > my security setting, but it now restricts root logins so i won't be tempted to login and
    > > possibly disclose the root password.
    >
    > That's not the reason that restriction is there. It's to stop yourself from doing a lot of damage
    > to the system, as you can accidentally do when logged in as root.
    >
    > though i can su to root after a login is established and do my
    > > thing (more secure i have been told). And another thing, rpm -ivv pukes out quite a bit
    > > information than it used to.
    >
    > RPM's are the devil's work. Learn how to work with tarballs.

    I can work just fine with tarballs, it is just faster to get back up with RPMs for the simple
    things (why didn't mdk9 come with Pico???). when i re-install snort, i will of course have to build
    from scratch.

    >
    > > Now i just have to get it so it will accept the network plan i have for
    > > it. i have 3 network cards. internet connection via eth0(192.168.0.0), future server farm via
    > > eth1(192.168.1.0) and my lan via eth2
    > > (192.168.2.). seems simple enough, but it just don't work
    >
    > "Seems simple enough?"! You're talking about setting up routing tables in a multi-homed router and
    > then applying all the firewall rules and the masquerading, PAT, etc, etc. I don't think that
    > counts as "simple". Anyway, you'll be wanting the advanced routing HOWTO:
    > http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Adv-Routing-HOWTO/index.html
    >
    >

    Perhaps "seems simple enough, in theory" would have been a better choice of words. and thanks for
    the link, http://www.shorewall.net/three- interface.htm didn't seem to provide much help, i'll have
    a good look at it in a bit.
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  12. B. Sanders

    B. Sanders Guest

    "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Technician wrote:

    >> First things first, format and install Slackware ;)

    >uhh, _NO_

    Slackware? I used to mess with that "back in the day" (when Slackware was still beta, and I loaded
    it with floppies onto my blazing-fast 486DX machine
    :) Gimme a smooth, free-running installation any day. Mandrake is a dream
    by comparison. I *love* plug-n-play under Linux. Incredible.

    > RPM's are the devil's work. Learn how to work with tarballs.

    RPM's work great. Why switch? If you can admin Linux at all, then tarballs aren't a challenge (try
    any administration or backups/restores without using tar). I still prefer RPM's.

    > > Now i just have to get it so it will accept the network plan i have for
    > > it. i have 3 network cards. internet connection via eth0(192.168.0.0), future server farm via
    > > eth1(192.168.1.0) and my lan via eth2
    > > (192.168.2.). seems simple enough, but it just don't work

    Doesn't sound simple at all. I chucked all that and bought a Netgear
    802.11b 4-port LAN router with firewall capabilities for $39 (about the price of 2 network cards)
    and it works perfectly. I have two wireless AP's (in addition to Cat 5e cabling through a
    100Mbps switch) that work flawlessly with the DHCP servers on both sides of the firewall, NAT,
    etc. Windows sharing, Samba, Appletalk - it all works. I even have my Silicon Graphics Indy
    talking to the DHCP server under IRIX 6.2 (had to tweak the configs heavily). Locking out ports
    and setting trusted IP#'s is a cakewalk, from any computer on the network via web browser. Doing
    all of this under Linux would be a PITA; though I have used LRP-based routers, and they're OK
    (if/when they work right). I like things that are simple, and the hardware router is just that.

    -Barry
     
  13. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Technician wrote:

    >>First things first, format and install Slackware ;)
    >>
    >>
    >
    > uhh, _NO_

    Why not?
     
  14. Technician

    Technician Guest

    > > "Seems simple enough?"! You're talking about setting up routing tables in a multi-homed router
    > > and then applying all the firewall rules and the masquerading, PAT, etc, etc. I don't think that
    > > counts as "simple". Anyway, you'll be wanting the advanced routing HOWTO:
    > > http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Adv-Routing-HOWTO/index.html
    > >
    > My question is why? Seems like a lot of work for...what. Is the aim to make a router with a DMZ?
    >
    >

    In general, yes, a DMZ is what i am after. why? mainly for the experience, and i enjoy a good
    challenge.
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  15. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, myarse247 @hotmail.com says...
    > Technician wrote:
    >
    > >>First things first, format and install Slackware ;)
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
    > > uhh, _NO_
    >
    > Why not?
    >
    >

    i just got done installing mandrake, and when somebody gives me a solution that involves downloading
    a few more Gigs of data @ 5K/sec, learning the little quirks of a different distribution, and having
    to start all over when i was just starting to get the system more or less back up, and when what i
    have now will work just fine, i generally am "put off" by the answer.

    I have nothing against slack.
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  16. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, myarse247 @hotmail.com says...
    > Technician wrote:
    >
    > > I have noticed several new things. for one, wget has a new look, and i like it. it may just be
    > > my security setting, but it now restricts root logins so i won't be tempted to login and
    > > possibly disclose the root password.
    >
    > That's not the reason that restriction is there. It's to stop yourself from doing a lot of damage
    > to the system, as you can accidentally do when logged in as root.
    >
    > though i can su to root after a login is established and do my
    > > thing (more secure i have been told). And another thing, rpm -ivv pukes out quite a bit
    > > information than it used to.
    >
    > RPM's are the devil's work. Learn how to work with tarballs.
    >
    > > Now i just have to get it so it will accept the network plan i have for
    > > it. i have 3 network cards. internet connection via eth0(192.168.0.0), future server farm via
    > > eth1(192.168.1.0) and my lan via eth2
    > > (192.168.2.). seems simple enough, but it just don't work
    >
    > "Seems simple enough?"! You're talking about setting up routing tables in a multi-homed router and
    > then applying all the firewall rules and the masquerading, PAT, etc, etc. I don't think that
    > counts as "simple". Anyway, you'll be wanting the advanced routing HOWTO:
    > http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Adv-Routing-HOWTO/index.html
    >
    >

    It would seem routing is working as i am posting through my new router. ...however, shorewall is
    essentially turned off in order for it to work. But, i have made progress in that before it would
    not allow any access through the router. ahh, the bliss of partial success.

    now, i just have to figure out how to configure the firewall. I think i have it mainly figured
    out, i just have to figure out what ports need to be forwarded so the winXP ICS remote connection
    thing will work (yes, the internet gateway and my workstation is still xp). xp users will know
    what i speak of. when computer A is sharing the connection, there will be a network connection
    for the dial-up shown on computer B so it can connect and disconnect. i think i found the ports,
    but i was apparently wrong. i used dnat to try and forward them. something about what i did
    didn't work though.
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  17. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Technician wrote:

    > It would seem routing is working as i am posting through my new router. ...however, shorewall is
    > essentially turned off in order for it to work. But, i have made progress in that before it would
    > not allow any access through the router. ahh, the bliss of partial success.
    >
    > now, i just have to figure out how to configure the firewall. I think i have it mainly figured
    > out, i just have to figure out what ports need to be forwarded so the winXP ICS remote connection
    > thing will work (yes, the internet gateway and my workstation is still xp). xp users will know
    > what i speak of. when computer A is sharing the connection, there will be a network connection
    > for the dial-up shown on computer B so it can connect and disconnect. i think i found the ports,
    > but i was apparently wrong. i used dnat to try and forward them. something about what i did
    > didn't work though.

    You perpetually confuse me. In the first paragraph you say that you're posting through your new
    router, but then in the second paragraph, you say that you're using XP as your gateway. Now unless
    I've missed something and you actually have three computers and are routing through two gateways,
    that doesn't really make a huge amount of sense.

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  18. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Technician wrote:
    >
    > > It would seem routing is working as i am posting through my new router. ...however, shorewall is
    > > essentially turned off in order for it to work. But, i have made progress in that before it
    > > would not allow any access through the router. ahh, the bliss of partial success.
    > >
    > > now, i just have to figure out how to configure the firewall. I think i have it mainly figured
    > > out, i just have to figure out what ports need to be forwarded so the winXP ICS remote
    > > connection thing will work (yes, the internet gateway and my workstation is still xp). xp users
    > > will know what i speak of. when computer A is sharing the connection, there will be a network
    > > connection for the dial-up shown on computer B so it can connect and disconnect. i think i found
    > > the ports, but i was apparently wrong. i used dnat to try and forward them. something about what
    > > i did didn't work though.
    >
    > You perpetually confuse me. In the first paragraph you say that you're posting through your new
    > router, but then in the second paragraph, you say that you're using XP as your gateway. Now unless
    > I've missed something and you actually have three computers and are routing through two gateways,
    > that doesn't really make a huge amount of sense.
    >
    >

    here is a schematic of my network. http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/tmp/network_schematic.jpg

    Notice, i said i was posting through my router, not from it. there are two new computers, mine and
    my parents. everything else is built from salvage. keep in mind, there is no rhyme or reason to my
    network setup, mostly just changed when i want to try something new. the IP addresses are pretty
    much picked from a hat so there is no real order to them (though in the future i plan to change them
    all to be in order).

    My father managed to pick up a bare-bones case, again, so i plan to test its stability and put it
    into operation as the router for my network, and move my server into the currently unused DMZ
    (192.168.1.1). it managed to come with a mainboard, and PSU, though i can't seem to find a hard
    drive that will work in it. could be it just simply doesn't work. my father does a lot of carpentry
    work for a computer guy (and no, he isn't highering), and this guy just throws out some computers
    now and then. figured if it was stable, i would load it with Mandrake MNF.
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  19. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

  20. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Technician wrote:
    >
    > > here is a schematic of my network. http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/tmp/network_schematic.jpg
    > >
    > > Notice, i said i was posting through my router, not from it. there are two new computers, mine
    > > and my parents.
    >
    > Exactly. As I said - unless you're "routing through two gateways" - which you are.
    >
    >

    Ahh ok, just a misunderstanding.
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
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