Yakima roof rack on a Jeep Wrangler?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Kiault, Jan 22, 2003.

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  1. Kiault

    Kiault Guest

    I just bought a factory hardtop for my Wrangler TJ and noticed that it has rain gutters on it. Can I
    use a Yakima roof rack with rain gutter
    (1A) towers to carry a couple bikes? If so, what are the limitations if any? Thanks, Kurt
     
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  2. Ben Reuter

    Ben Reuter Guest

    Don't know about the gutters, but for what it is worth I sold a YJ in Sept that had a Yakima rack
    on it for ~75,000 miles. I used bolt top loaders and drilled holes right through the roof- if I was
    to do it over I would use the tracks that Yakima sells to have some fore/aft bar adjustment. The
    rack worked fine- usually carried 2 bikes on it, but on one epic carried 3 bikes, a space case
    fully loaded (at least 200 pounds on it) and the system worked fine. I even had the dreaded "forgot
    the bike was on top" going through a bank teller kiosk and it just jarred the bars loose from the
    roof mounts.

    Ben Reuter

    "KIAult" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I just bought a factory hardtop for my Wrangler TJ and noticed that it has rain gutters on it. Can
    > I use a Yakima roof rack with rain gutter
    > (1A) towers to carry a couple bikes? If so, what are the limitations if any? Thanks, Kurt
     
  3. KIAult wrote:
    >
    > I just bought a factory hardtop for my Wrangler TJ and noticed that it has rain gutters on it. Can
    > I use a Yakima roof rack with rain gutter
    > (1A) towers to carry a couple bikes? If so, what are the limitations if any? Thanks, Kurt

    I have a Wrangler Sport, and I'm 6 feet tall. Do you have any idea what it's going to be like to get
    bikes up there? <G>

    The gutters on my '99's hardtop do not appear strong enough to support weight. Aditionally, there's
    only a gutter on the front 1/2 of the top. Most Wrangler roof racks I've seen attach to the
    windshield frame and rear corners of the body, with pillars holding the rack up. Some of them are
    hinged to allow the the rack to move when raising or lowering the soft top.

    Another idea might be to use Yakima's mounts designed for fiberglass pickup caps. These are drilled
    through the roof, and are very strong, but the mounts can't be removed without leaving holes.

    One more question, why own a Wrangler if you don't use a soft top during biking season? <G> I've had
    three of them and they kinda suck in the summer with the hardtop (and doors) on.

    Barry
     
  4. Dave W.

    Dave W. Guest

    As long as you use standard Yak hardware, I think you're OK to go. You could call Yakima's customer
    service and ask them if you're unsure. There will be a load limit in pounds that you'll want to be
    careful of as well. Wind shear force is also a factor. Two bikes sounds reasonable.

    - Dave W. (former Yakima dealer)

    [email protected] (KIAult) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I just bought a factory hardtop for my Wrangler TJ and noticed that it has rain gutters on it. Can
    > I use a Yakima roof rack with rain gutter
    > (1A) towers to carry a couple bikes? If so, what are the limitations if any? Thanks, Kurt
     
  5. Jbs

    Jbs Guest

    [email protected] (KIAult) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I just bought a factory hardtop for my Wrangler TJ and noticed that it has rain gutters on it. Can
    > I use a Yakima roof rack with rain gutter
    > (1A) towers to carry a couple bikes?

    Have you taken a look at Thule's "Spare Me Spare Tire" or Yakima's "SpareRoc"? They both bolt onto
    the spare tire receiver and can carry 2 bikes.

    I've got Thule's version and have been using it for the past year. I decided against hitch-mounted
    racks so I can continue to tow a trailer if necessary.

    As another poster mentioned, its going to be difficult to get bikes up and down from a roof rack
    unless your pretty tall or have a step ladder.
     
  6. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > [email protected] (KIAult) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I just bought a factory hardtop for my Wrangler TJ and noticed that it has rain gutters on it.
    > > Can I use a Yakima roof rack with rain gutter
    > > (1A) towers to carry a couple bikes?

    "jbs" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Have you taken a look at Thule's "Spare Me Spare Tire" or Yakima's "SpareRoc"? They both bolt onto
    > the spare tire receiver and can carry 2 bikes.
    >
    > I've got Thule's version and have been using it for the past year. I decided against hitch-mounted
    > racks so I can continue to tow a trailer if necessary.
    >
    > As another poster mentioned, its going to be difficult to get bikes up and down from a roof rack
    > unless your pretty tall or have a step ladder.

    The usual technique is to stand in the doorwell.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  7. A Muzi wrote:
    >
    > > As another poster mentioned, its going to be difficult to get bikes up and down from a roof rack
    > > unless your pretty tall or have a step ladder.
    >
    > The usual technique is to stand in the doorwell.
    >
    > --

    I know HOW to do it. <G>

    It still isn't easy, especially with most 30 pound or so mountain bikes. The person has to hold
    themselves up with one hand, while pulling the bike up with the other, then turn and transfer weight
    so both hands are free to latch things in. To make matters worse, Wranglers have a lip at the bottom
    of the door, and doors that don't stay open on their own.

    Put 'em on the back of a Wrangler!

    Barry
     
  8. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > > > As another poster mentioned, its going to be difficult to get bikes up and down from a roof
    > > > rack unless your pretty tall or have a step ladder.

    >([email protected]) mistakenly thinking I understood this, offered:
    > > The usual technique is to stand in the doorwell.

    "B a r r y B u r k e J r ." <[email protected]> enlightened me in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I know HOW to do it. <G>
    >
    > It still isn't easy, especially with most 30 pound or so mountain bikes. The person has to hold
    > themselves up with one hand, while pulling the bike up with the other, then turn and transfer
    > weight so both hands are free to latch things in. To make matters worse, Wranglers have a lip at
    > the bottom of the door, and doors that don't stay open on their own.
    >
    > Put 'em on the back of a Wrangler!

    Sorry, I didn't mean to be snotty when I wrote that.

    And thanks, I didn't realize that Jeeps were different from other cars in regard to doors and
    doorwells ( never been in one).

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org

    Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  9. A Muzi wrote:
    >
    > Sorry, I didn't mean to be snotty when I wrote that.

    No offense taken! I didn't see it as a snotty remark. <G>

    Barry
     
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