Yet another new road bike thread



sm0241

New Member
Jan 19, 2007
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Hello everyone, probably gonna get flamed for this one but I just wanted to know what peoples thoughts are.
I moved to Sydney recently and didn't bring my bike with me although it was a modest road bike and was only used for commuting which I did nearly everyday.
I want to start cycling here but not just for commuting (actually may not commute at all), the weather and road conditions are so much better here.

I've been in a few cycle shops around Sydney and mainly the big one in Chatswood that stocks Specialized and Avanti. I looked at the Avanti Carbino 1.0, 2.0 and Corsa and also the Specialized Roubaix and Tarmac. I've sat on all of them but haven't rode any of them, basically one of the older gentlemen in the shop said that if I went out for a quick spin on any of them I'd probably prefer the Specialized (more expensive bikes but doesn't always mean better). When explaining about the Specialized range he told me that roughly speaking the Tarmacs are more of a Formula one bike for a racer whereas the Roubaixs are Forumula one for the "more" normal rider. The Roubaix and Tarmac Comps are the same price at about $3.6k and the Experts are about $4.6k. Anyone riding these and what do they think of them ? Components seems to be the only real difference between both Comps and Experts in their range with the same frame on each range although the very bright red colour woudn't be my cup of tea at all. I was told that 105 stuff is absolutely fine for say around 200km's a week.

The guys in the shop have been very helpful and have given me a lot of advice (whether it's good or bad depends on me I guess).
My main worry is buying something that I'm not happy with in a years time. I realize that some people will say I'm being foolish and wasting money buying some of the bikes I've mentioned when I'm only starting out so to speak in this country and I can understand that opinion. I don't drive, no kids, single & not married so cost is not as much of a factor for me but I'm careful with money and just want to get the best thing I can for myself from the start. I realize that I have to spend more money on other things apart from the bike itself.

For the people that have their flame throwers ready go easy on me.

Thanks in advance,
Steve
 

caferacerwanabe

New Member
Oct 14, 2006
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If you are looking at Specialized maybe you should also look at Merida's road bike range , very big in mainland Europe , non-existent in the States due to their purchase of part of Specialized a few years back.
 

mikeg

New Member
Jun 6, 2003
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sm0241 said:
Hello everyone, probably gonna get flamed for this one but I just wanted to know what peoples thoughts are.
I moved to Sydney recently and didn't bring my bike with me although it was a modest road bike and was only used for commuting which I did nearly everyday.
I want to start cycling here but not just for commuting (actually may not commute at all), the weather and road conditions are so much better here.

I've been in a few cycle shops around Sydney and mainly the big one in Chatswood that stocks Specialized and Avanti. I looked at the Avanti Carbino 1.0, 2.0 and Corsa and also the Specialized Roubaix and Tarmac. I've sat on all of them but haven't rode any of them, basically one of the older gentlemen in the shop said that if I went out for a quick spin on any of them I'd probably prefer the Specialized (more expensive bikes but doesn't always mean better). When explaining about the Specialized range he told me that roughly speaking the Tarmacs are more of a Formula one bike for a racer whereas the Roubaixs are Forumula one for the "more" normal rider. The Roubaix and Tarmac Comps are the same price at about $3.6k and the Experts are about $4.6k. Anyone riding these and what do they think of them ? Components seems to be the only real difference between both Comps and Experts in their range with the same frame on each range although the very bright red colour woudn't be my cup of tea at all. I was told that 105 stuff is absolutely fine for say around 200km's a week.

The guys in the shop have been very helpful and have given me a lot of advice (whether it's good or bad depends on me I guess).
My main worry is buying something that I'm not happy with in a years time. I realize that some people will say I'm being foolish and wasting money buying some of the bikes I've mentioned when I'm only starting out so to speak in this country and I can understand that opinion. I don't drive, no kids, single & not married so cost is not as much of a factor for me but I'm careful with money and just want to get the best thing I can for myself from the start. I realize that I have to spend more money on other things apart from the bike itself.

For the people that have their flame throwers ready go easy on me.

Thanks in advance,
Steve

Steve

If you are looking for a touring style for longer rides (longer wheelbase, longer chainstays) the Specialized Sequoia fit this category

Mike
 

dain2772

New Member
Aug 13, 2006
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You could also try Bikebug on the pacific highway down near North Sydney - they are quite good and stock Felt, Argon, BH, Colnago...
 

Walrus

New Member
Apr 4, 2004
850
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I'm not actually sure what your question is? Feedback on those models you've suggested, advise on how much to spend, advice on what other bikes to consider?

Budget will largely determine which range of bikes you look at. If you can come up with an amount that you're happy to spend, it will be easier for us to narrow your search. 105 is a really good place to start and will serve you very well. See the cyclingnews review of the 10spd 105 groupset (http://www.cyclingnews.com/tech.php?id=tech/2007/reviews/shimano105group) and you'll see that they agree that the 105 is great, and compares very well to the more expensive Shimano options.

The best piece of advice I can give you is to take on board all the advice you get, but remember that everyone will have their own opinion...so it needs to be your decision. You're the one who'll be riding the bike, so do some research, have a test ride and buy the bike that feels right.
 

sogood

New Member
Aug 24, 2006
2,148
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After getting back to cycling, I am firming up my view that for someone who doesn't quite understand what they want or need, spending big bucks on those top end bikes is a high risk venture. Sure, they are all great bikes at those prices, but they are typically also designed with specialized objectives in mind, and may not fit your needs now, or in one year time as you evolve your cycling.

It would be wise to consider a cheaper bike or even a second hand mid-range bike, get to know your riding better, be it touring, commuting, recreation or racing, and then move onto a higher end bike if you so desire. You can consider the change over cost to be your insurance money.
 

thomas_cho

New Member
Jan 4, 2005
508
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sogood said:
After getting back to cycling, I am firming up my view that for someone who doesn't quite understand what they want or need, spending big bucks on those top end bikes is a high risk venture. Sure, they are all great bikes at those prices, but they are typically also designed with specialized objectives in mind, and may not fit your needs now, or in one year time as you evolve your cycling.

It would be wise to consider a cheaper bike or even a second hand mid-range bike, get to know your riding better, be it touring, commuting, recreation or racing, and then move onto a higher end bike if you so desire. You can consider the change over cost to be your insurance money.
Quite agree with sogood.
 

The Double Zero

New Member
Apr 15, 2005
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thomas_cho said:
Quite agree with sogood.
Double that.
It seems like buying a bike these days is like buying a computer, as soon as you think you have something good, something else comes out a month later that is superior, so deteremine your needs then buy accordingly.
 

sm0241

New Member
Jan 19, 2007
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48
Thanks for the replies, I think 105 will be fine for me and as the guy in the shop said I won't have any problems doing 200k a week on it.
I've looked at the Avanti Corsa and the Specialized Tarmac Comp a lot and consider them to be my main options. The Corsa has full Ultegra gear with an alu frame and the Tarmac has mostly 105 with a carbon frame. The Corsa is a about $2.6k and the Tarmac $3.6k and I think that both are pretty future proof for me to a certain degree anyway. I'm looking to stay within the £1.5k GBP ~ $3.7k AUD budget, I can't justify anything near £2k ~ $5k.[size=-1]

[/size]sogood,
Yep I'm pretty sure where I am and want to be in terms of my cycling. The guy in the shop mentioned racing and that's one area that I'm not sure of yet, in fact I didn't really consider it until he mentioned it. I've looked at a lot of bikes, a lot fo the top end stuff is on another planet. I think the bikes I'm considering are "top end" for me.

Walrus,
Yeah basically all you've mentioned and I think you guys have covered most of the angles at this stage.

Thanks again,
Steve
 

thomas_cho

New Member
Jan 4, 2005
508
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At 3.6K you have lots more options than just Specialized. Have you thought about Cervelo? Or Bianchi? Or even the Giant team bikes?

Have you already decided your preferred frame material?

Blackman cycles in Parramatta have Avanti, Giant and Bianchis. So you may be able to compare them with the Avanti's you have already seen. Just further down from them there is Bikebarn, which should have cervelo, orbea, and more.
 

99Honeyburst

New Member
Jan 19, 2007
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thomas_cho said:
At 3.6K you have lots more options than just Specialized. Have you thought about Cervelo? Or Bianchi? Or even the Giant team bikes?
Whoa - 3.6k for a 200km per week commuter/trainer is a lot of dough but more power to you he said jealously! :)

As Thomas_cho says that sort of money gets you into some much more exotic territory and would get you Ultegra running gear at a minimum. I'd be looking at Cannondale at that price point too.

Good luck...
 

artemidorus

New Member
Mar 10, 2004
2,307
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36
The Double Zero said:
Double that.
It seems like buying a bike these days is like buying a computer, as soon as you think you have something good, something else comes out a month later that is superior, so deteremine your needs then buy accordingly.
I don't agree. Since integrated shifters and dual pivot brakes became standard in the early to mid 90s, there has not been one major advance in road bike technology. (I'll correct myself - perhaps tyres are a little better). Since then, the manufacturers have had to concoct supposed advances: "wheelsets", composites, "aero", increasing cluster sprocket numbers. These changes mean little for 99% of road cyclists (except for bling purposes). If your 1995 bike fits you and is comfortable, and you are not an elite racer, then nothing newer is worth the upgrade.
 

thomas_cho

New Member
Jan 4, 2005
508
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Realistically its comes down to a tussle between needs and wants.

The entry level components on my commuter bike have yet to skip a beat, but yet I want Ultegra level stuff. I probably dont need it, but I certainly want it.
 

mcgsp

New Member
Feb 9, 2007
1
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0
sm0241 said:
Hello everyone, probably gonna get flamed for this one but I just wanted to know what peoples thoughts are.
I moved to Sydney recently and didn't bring my bike with me although it was a modest road bike and was only used for commuting which I did nearly everyday.
I want to start cycling here but not just for commuting (actually may not commute at all), the weather and road conditions are so much better here.

I've been in a few cycle shops around Sydney and mainly the big one in Chatswood that stocks Specialized and Avanti. I looked at the Avanti Carbino 1.0, 2.0 and Corsa and also the Specialized Roubaix and Tarmac. I've sat on all of them but haven't rode any of them, basically one of the older gentlemen in the shop said that if I went out for a quick spin on any of them I'd probably prefer the Specialized (more expensive bikes but doesn't always mean better). When explaining about the Specialized range he told me that roughly speaking the Tarmacs are more of a Formula one bike for a racer whereas the Roubaixs are Forumula one for the "more" normal rider. The Roubaix and Tarmac Comps are the same price at about $3.6k and the Experts are about $4.6k. Anyone riding these and what do they think of them ? Components seems to be the only real difference between both Comps and Experts in their range with the same frame on each range although the very bright red colour woudn't be my cup of tea at all. I was told that 105 stuff is absolutely fine for say around 200km's a week.

The guys in the shop have been very helpful and have given me a lot of advice (whether it's good or bad depends on me I guess).
My main worry is buying something that I'm not happy with in a years time. I realize that some people will say I'm being foolish and wasting money buying some of the bikes I've mentioned when I'm only starting out so to speak in this country and I can understand that opinion. I don't drive, no kids, single & not married so cost is not as much of a factor for me but I'm careful with money and just want to get the best thing I can for myself from the start. I realize that I have to spend more money on other things apart from the bike itself.

For the people that have their flame throwers ready go easy on me.

Thanks in advance,
Steve

Steve,

I've have ridden both Tarmac, and Roubaix by Specialized. The Tarmac is quicker do to its compact geomtry, it rides beautifully, but frankly if I am doing over 120kms in a day, I much prefer the Roubaix maybe because of having past back issues. It is still quick, (I am easily able to handle 20mph avg. for long rides) but frankly my body does not seem as puinished as the Tarmac. One quick note, the Roubaix Comp now has only Shimano 105 equipment installed the Roubaix. The model I purchased is Ultegra equipped, but that should not make too much of difference in your ride.

All in all you'll be happy with either bike, and should you wish to go to a lower price point, look at Specialized Elite, or entry level Felt bike.