Yippee! I'm free!

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Tom Keats, Aug 15, 2004.

  1. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    Went for a ride up just for something to do. I was actually
    heading toward the Harry Jerome Sports Centre in Burnaby, BC.
    While I was grunting it up the Barnet Hwy I spotted a strange
    sort of glint from among the roadside litter. I stopped and
    had a closer look. It was a $20 bill, slightly faded from
    the sunlight, but in otherwise good condition. I quickly
    scooped it, and continued on for awhile until I thought:
    "Waidaminnit!" So I doubled back and looked around for
    more bills, but there weren't any.

    Somewhere along the homebound leg, my cycloputer head fell
    off without my noticing. Free at last! I'm saving the
    Yanking Off Of The Wiring Harness for a little later, when
    I can truly savour the experience. The $20 is /not/ going
    toward a new computer.

    Ya win some; ya lose some. Sometimes you can even win
    by losing.


    cheers,
    Tom


    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
    Tags:


  2. Fx199

    Fx199 Guest

    >Subject: Yippee! I'm free!
    >From: [email protected] (Tom Keats)
    >Date: 8/15/2004 7:07 PM US Eastern Standard Time
    >Message-id: <[email protected]>
    >
    >Went for a ride up just for something to do. I was actually
    >heading toward the Harry Jerome Sports Centre in Burnaby, BC.
    >While I was grunting it up the Barnet Hwy I spotted a strange
    >sort of glint from among the roadside litter. I stopped and
    >had a closer look. It was a $20 bill, slightly faded from
    >the sunlight, but in otherwise good condition. I quickly
    >scooped it, and continued on for awhile until I thought:
    >"Waidaminnit!" So I doubled back and looked around for
    >more bills, but there weren't any.
    >
    >Somewhere along the homebound leg, my cycloputer head fell
    >off without my noticing. Free at last! I'm saving the
    >Yanking Off Of The Wiring Harness for a little later, when
    >I can truly savour the experience. The $20 is /not/ going
    >toward a new computer.
    >
    >Ya win some; ya lose some. Sometimes you can even win
    >by losing.
    >
    >
    >cheers,
    > Tom
    >


    uh...you never liked the bike computer?
     
  3. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Fx199) writes:

    > uh...you never liked the bike computer?


    Not since I realized I had become addicted to it,
    and had been scrupulously journalizing all my
    rides -- numbers 'n all. Screw a bunch of numbers.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  4. Fx199

    Fx199 Guest

    >Subject: Re: Yippee! I'm free!
    >From: [email protected] (Tom Keats)
    >Date: 8/15/2004 7:42 PM US Eastern Standard Time
    >Message-id: <[email protected]>
    >
    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] (Fx199) writes:
    >
    >> uh...you never liked the bike computer?

    >
    >Not since I realized I had become addicted to it,
    >and had been scrupulously journalizing all my
    >rides -- numbers 'n all. Screw a bunch of numbers.
    >
    >
    >cheers,
    > Tom




    I just want to know mileage, and maybe a cadence readout and and speed. I won't
    write anything down afterwards I promise ;-D. I was thinking Polar 520
     
  5. Glm

    Glm Guest

    On 16 Aug 2004 01:09:02 GMT, Fx199 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I just want to know mileage, and maybe a cadence readout and and speed.
    > I won't
    > write anything down afterwards I promise ;-D. I was thinking Polar 520


    I bought an S725 for myself and an S520 for a friend of mine, whom I
    thought would do well to keep an eye on his heart rate. For what it's
    worth, the S520 seems to offer pretty much everything the average cycling
    enthusiast would require: heart, cadence, speed, distance, trip, etc. The
    S150 doesn't offer cadence, and lacks a backlight, etc.

    The S520 seems rock-solid and has the functionality that most require.
    The S725 holds more files for recording data, and sports an altimeter and
    thermometer for ambient temperature.

    Haven't tried the PC-based software for either yet.
     
  6. Bill Baka

    Bill Baka Guest

    On Mon, 16 Aug 2004 02:31:55 GMT, Glm <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 16 Aug 2004 01:09:02 GMT, Fx199 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> I just want to know mileage, and maybe a cadence readout and and
    >> speed. I won't
    >> write anything down afterwards I promise ;-D. I was thinking Polar 520

    >
    > I bought an S725 for myself and an S520 for a friend of mine, whom I
    > thought would do well to keep an eye on his heart rate. For what it's
    > worth, the S520 seems to offer pretty much everything the average
    > cycling enthusiast would require: heart, cadence, speed, distance,
    > trip, etc. The S150 doesn't offer cadence, and lacks a backlight, etc.
    >
    > The S520 seems rock-solid and has the functionality that most require.
    > The S725 holds more files for recording data, and sports an altimeter
    > and thermometer for ambient temperature.
    >
    > Haven't tried the PC-based software for either yet.


    Does anybody have recommendations? I would kind of like a speedometer
    if only to see how fast I can go downhill. It felt like about 45 MPH
    today, fast enough to make my eyes water, but I would like to get
    some bragging rights. It seems like a heart rate monitor would want to
    be another instrument so it could be used off the bike, hiking and
    running in my case. Add a GPS to go with my cell phone and camera
    and I would be set. Oh, and an inclinometer. I have been riding
    all my life but never bought the neat electronic stuff.
    Is that enough questions?
    Bill Baka


    --
    Using M2, Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2/
     
  7. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Fx199) writes:

    > I just want to know mileage, and maybe a cadence readout and and speed.


    That's how I originally thought, too. But it occurred to me --
    once I've got the numbers, I might as well keep 'em. Otherwise,
    what's the point of having them? In the end, it's sort of like
    keeping old TV Guides. Oh well. I got to write some SNOBOL4
    and Perl data extraction programs, and some gnuplot scripts.

    > I won't
    > write anything down afterwards I promise ;-D.


    Once you start, that's the thin edge of the wedge.

    > I was thinking Polar 520


    Whatever tickles your fancy. I'm not disparaging
    cyclocomputers for everybody. But I guess they're
    just not for me.

    Actually, I've got an identical Cateye Astrale head
    that I found on the road a few years ago. I'll just
    have to resist using that one, too.

    Now I can start thinking about getting a camera.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  8. Hunrobe

    Hunrobe Guest

    >[email protected] (Tom Keats)

    wrote in part:

    >
    >Actually, I've got an identical Cateye Astrale head
    >that I found on the road a few years ago. I'll just
    >have to resist using that one, too.


    Allow me to help you keep off that slippery slope, Tom. Email me and I'll send
    you my address so you can mail that tool of the devil to me.

    Helpfully yours,
    Bob Hunt
     
  9. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Hunrobe) writes:
    >>[email protected] (Tom Keats)

    >
    > wrote in part:
    >
    >>
    >>Actually, I've got an identical Cateye Astrale head
    >>that I found on the road a few years ago. I'll just
    >>have to resist using that one, too.

    >
    > Allow me to help you keep off that slippery slope, Tom. Email me and I'll send
    > you my address so you can mail that tool of the devil to me.
    >
    > Helpfully yours,
    > Bob Hunt



    Heh :) I think I'll just keep it as a reminder
    of my former sinful ways.

    I'm keeping the manual, too.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  10. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Sun, 15 Aug 2004 23:10:49 -0700, <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Tom Keats) wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] (Hunrobe) writes:
    >>>[email protected] (Tom Keats)

    >>
    >> wrote in part:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>Actually, I've got an identical Cateye Astrale head
    >>>that I found on the road a few years ago. I'll just
    >>>have to resist using that one, too.

    >>
    >> Allow me to help you keep off that slippery slope, Tom. Email me and I'll send
    >> you my address so you can mail that tool of the devil to me.
    >>
    >> Helpfully yours,
    >> Bob Hunt

    >
    >
    >Heh :) I think I'll just keep it as a reminder
    >of my former sinful ways.
    >
    >I'm keeping the manual, too.
    >

    You're welcome to my pile of manuals, three harnesses and four empty
    boxes.
    --
    zk
     
  11. Glm

    Glm Guest

    On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 20:10:25 -0700, Bill Baka <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > Does anybody have recommendations? I would kind of like a speedometer
    > if only to see how fast I can go downhill. It felt like about 45 MPH
    > today, fast enough to make my eyes water, but I would like to get
    > some bragging rights. It seems like a heart rate monitor would want to
    > be another instrument so it could be used off the bike, hiking and
    > running in my case. Add a GPS to go with my cell phone and camera
    > and I would be set. Oh, and an inclinometer. I have been riding
    > all my life but never bought the neat electronic stuff.
    > Is that enough questions?
    > Bill Baka
    >
    >



    Seems like you are clear what is required. S725 would fit the bill, IMHO.
     
  12. AustinMN

    AustinMN Guest

    Tom Keats wrote:
    > [email protected] (Fx199) writes:
    >
    > > uh...you never liked the bike computer?

    >
    > Not since I realized I had become addicted to it,
    > and had been scrupulously journalizing all my
    > rides -- numbers 'n all. Screw a bunch of numbers.


    Hey, thanks for helping me out. My cycle computer gave up the ghost last
    fall and I hadn't bothered to replace it. Now I know why, and have decided
    to quit saying "I gotta get a new one."

    Austin
    --
    I'm pedaling as fast as I durn well please!
    There are no X characters in my address
     
  13. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "AustinMN" <[email protected]> writes:
    > Tom Keats wrote:
    >> [email protected] (Fx199) writes:
    >>
    >> > uh...you never liked the bike computer?

    >>
    >> Not since I realized I had become addicted to it,
    >> and had been scrupulously journalizing all my
    >> rides -- numbers 'n all. Screw a bunch of numbers.

    >
    > Hey, thanks for helping me out. My cycle computer gave up the ghost last
    > fall and I hadn't bothered to replace it. Now I know why, and have decided
    > to quit saying "I gotta get a new one."


    Well, today was my first cycloputer-free day in a long time.
    And I've gotta admit, there was some withdrawal. But it's
    not too bad, actually. Rather liberating.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  14. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Zoot Katz <[email protected]> writes:

    > You're welcome to my pile of manuals, three harnesses and four empty
    > boxes.


    Thanx, but I've already got more than enough of that kind
    of stuff. However, if you've got a spare old Olympus Stylus
    camera (or a pair of size 10 steel-toed boots) ...

    In re: bike computers:
    I have difficulty with things associated with the word:
    'harness' being connected with bicycles. It just seems
    so incongruous, and detracting from the freedom that
    bicycles offer. I've never heard of computers on
    canoes. Maybe there is such a thing, but I'd prefer
    not to hear about it. Blinders, y'know <Big F'ing Grin>

    Wires look ugly against bike frames anyways.
    Probably even worse on canoes.


    klahowya,
    Tom

    --
    -- Screw a bunch of numbers.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  15. "Tom Keats" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I've never heard of computers on
    > canoes.


    Well, I dunno about canoes, but I saw a kayak speedometer / odometer the
    other day when I was scoring a blem graphite paddle for half-price.

    Had a little doomaflidgit that hooked on to the skeg, then wires ran up to a
    little readout thing.

    Don't know how speed through the water is transduced.
     
  16. Fx199

    Fx199 Guest

    >Don't know how speed through the water is transduced.
    >
    >


    A little paddlewheel like any other water speedometer I would imagine
     
  17. Hunrobe

    Hunrobe Guest

    >[email protected]

    wrote in part:

    >Wires look ugly against bike frames anyways.


    If you don't want to drill holes in your frame- I sure didn't- you could do
    what I did on my road bike. Since the cadence pickup had to be there anyway, I
    bought a rear mount wiring harness and put both pickups on the chainstays. A
    few dabs of epoxy secured the wires to the *inside* of the chainstay, up the
    underside of the downtube, and up the front of the headtube where the brake and
    shifter cables hide it quite nicely. Except for a few inches of wiring at the
    stem it looks like a completely wireless setup.
    Or one could just chuck the computer altogether like you have and save all that
    fastidiousness for something really important. Like cleaning the tire
    sidewalls, polishing all the chrome bits, and waxing the carbon fiber ones.
    (Yeah, I admit it... I tend to obsess. <g> )

    Regards,
    Bob Hunt
     
  18. AustinMN

    AustinMN Guest

    Tom Keats wrote:
    > Well, today was my first cycloputer-free day in a long time.
    > And I've gotta admit, there was some withdrawal. But it's
    > not too bad, actually. Rather liberating.


    Maybe we need a 12 step group for recovering cycloputer addicts.

    Austin
    --
    I'm pedaling as fast as I durn well please!
    There are no X characters in my address
     
  19. "Tom Keats" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <20040815203322.04880.0[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] (Fx199) writes:
    >
    > > uh...you never liked the bike computer?

    >
    > Not since I realized I had become addicted to it,
    > and had been scrupulously journalizing all my
    > rides -- numbers 'n all. Screw a bunch of numbers.


    It's one of those interesting situations, where you make something that
    isn't a cage into one.

    I have a bike computer. When I changed my tire on RSVP, I guess I knocked
    the magnet, and for the last 3/4s of the ride I didn't have it working. My
    husband nagged me: "Why don't you stop and fix it?". Well, the question is,
    why bother? It's nice to have, but it isn't essential.

    It's now a couple of weeks past the event, and I still haven't jiggled it
    properly into place. It would have been nice to have on the kids' ride I
    led, because I'd like to lead a ride at the advertised pace. But I just let
    the kids set the pace, and didn't worry about it too much.

    When it's working, I like to see what my approximate weekly mileage is. I
    usually reset it Monday morning on the ride to work. In the winter, I'd like
    to average 75 miles; in the summer, about 125, outside of events. So, if
    it's Thursday morning, and it's the winter, and it says I've only done 45
    miles so far that week, I'll be more likely to make the effort to ride all
    the way in to the office, rather than wimping out and putting the bike on
    the bus. But if it's more or less, or it's raining pretty hard and I'd
    rather hang it up on the bus rack, it's no big.

    It's certainly not my thing to write down all these numbers, anyway. It
    doesn't have to be your thing, either. You can have a bike computer, and not
    have to be a slave to it.

    And I'll end this post with a story my friend told me from her vacation:

    > 8 year old kid: (looking at Lynne's bike) What's that?
    >
    > Lynne: That's the bike computer.
    >
    > Kid: Ooh, a bike computer?
    >
    > Lynne: Yeah, it shows how fast I'm going, how far I've gone, stuff like
    > that.
    >
    > Kid: (disappointed) Oh, I thought it was for the internet.
    >
    > Other cyclist present: (chokes on beer)


    :)


    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    please substitute yahoo for mousepotato to reply
    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    Personal page: http://www.geocities.com/cpetersky/
    See the books I've set free at: http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
  20. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Hunrobe) writes:
    >>[email protected]

    >
    > wrote in part:
    >
    >>Wires look ugly against bike frames anyways.

    >
    > If you don't want to drill holes in your frame- I sure didn't- you could do
    > what I did on my road bike. Since the cadence pickup had to be there anyway, I
    > bought a rear mount wiring harness and put both pickups on the chainstays. A
    > few dabs of epoxy secured the wires to the *inside* of the chainstay, up the
    > underside of the downtube, and up the front of the headtube where the brake and
    > shifter cables hide it quite nicely. Except for a few inches of wiring at the
    > stem it looks like a completely wireless setup.


    I especially like that it gets around having to use
    hideous zip ties.

    > Or one could just chuck the computer altogether like you have and save all that
    > fastidiousness for something really important. Like cleaning the tire
    > sidewalls, polishing all the chrome bits, and waxing the carbon fiber ones.
    > (Yeah, I admit it... I tend to obsess. <g> )


    Acch! I'm already stuck with 2-conductor lamp cord running from my
    rear wheel generator to front headlight. I gotta get me a hub
    generator, and a front wheel built around it.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
Loading...