Yogurt culture?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Jan 9, 2006.

  1. Hello everyone,

    I grew up in Brazil. At some point in the late 70's, early 80's, my
    mother got some yogurt culture from a friend of hers. We had fresh
    yogurt every day. I hated it, but wanted to love it because it was so
    exotic. So I ate it. :) Anyway, now, I live in New York, and am
    craving that fresh yogurt. I haven't found the type of culture my
    mother had anywhere. Maybe you know about it? I don't know the name of
    the bacteria, but the thing looked like small curd cottage cheese. It
    wasn't in powder form, and it never got mixed in with the results. We
    never ate the culture. It was sort of spongy to the touch, and white.
    Every once in a while, we had to throw or give some away, because it
    grew and multiplied. We had it on a clean plastic sieve, poured milk on
    it, and left it overnight, over a bowl. In the morning, there would be
    yogurt in the bowl. We would then rinse the culture (and sieve) very
    carefully, and repeat the whole process. Have you ever heard of this?
    Do you have any idea of what it was, what it is called, and where I can
    get some? My mother passed away almost 18 years ago. Unfortunately,
    there's nobody who would know what I am talking about.

    Thank you for your help and attention,

    Rosane.
     
    Tags:


  2. PastaLover

    PastaLover Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Hello everyone,
    >
    > I grew up in Brazil. At some point in the late 70's, early 80's, my
    > mother got some yogurt culture from a friend of hers. We had fresh
    > yogurt every day. I hated it, but wanted to love it because it was so
    > exotic. So I ate it. :) Anyway, now, I live in New York, and am
    > craving that fresh yogurt. I haven't found the type of culture my
    > mother had anywhere. Maybe you know about it? I don't know the name of
    > the bacteria, but the thing looked like small curd cottage cheese. It
    > wasn't in powder form, and it never got mixed in with the results. We
    > never ate the culture. It was sort of spongy to the touch, and white.
    > Every once in a while, we had to throw or give some away, because it
    > grew and multiplied. We had it on a clean plastic sieve, poured milk on
    > it, and left it overnight, over a bowl. In the morning, there would be
    > yogurt in the bowl. We would then rinse the culture (and sieve) very
    > carefully, and repeat the whole process. Have you ever heard of this?
    > Do you have any idea of what it was, what it is called, and where I can
    > get some? My mother passed away almost 18 years ago. Unfortunately,
    > there's nobody who would know what I am talking about.
    >
    > Thank you for your help and attention,
    >
    > Rosane.
    >


    You can get it at a health food store. Or you can possibly do it
    yourself if you can get real yogurt with live cultures in it. You simply
    save off a little of the old yogurt to make the next batch.

    When I was a kid, I used to make my own yogurt. Got the packet of
    culture at the health food store. It was a powder, if I remember. Once I
    had a good batch going, I'd just use a little of previous batch for the
    next batch. Keeping the milk the right temperature was the hard part.
     
  3. Leila

    Leila Guest

    When I was a kid in Middle America in the 70s, my Lebanese immigrant
    dad would culture yogurt from plain yogurt he bought at the store. He
    made sure it was Dannon or some other brand that didn't adulterate, and
    that it had live cultures.

    Then he scalded the milk, let it cool to (I believe) 110 degrees
    Fahrenheit. The Lebanese temp test method is - if you can hold your
    finger in it and count to ten before you must pull it out from the
    heat, it's the right temperature.

    Take a bit of yogurt (like a quarter cup for a good sized bowl of milk
    - 6 cups say) and stir the yogurt up in a coffee cup, to "break" the
    curd. Stir some of the hot milk into the cup. Then pour the whole mix
    into the yogurt, stir it once or twice, cover.

    Now comes the part where everybody fools around with different
    techniques. The LEbanese way is to bury the pot beneath all the
    blankets and winter overcoats in the house. Other folks have done
    things with styrofoam coolers, warm ovens, I don't know what else. I
    have no experience with that.

    If you use live yogurt and whole milk, and you get the temp
    approximately right, you should have yogurt in a few hours, like 8. The
    longer it sits, the "sourer" it gets.

    I've had trouble getting my yogurt to set the last times I've done it,
    but I think I'm out of practice, and I think I was using reduced fat
    milk. Possibly the yogurt cultures weren't live enough or adulterated.
    THe stuff tasted yogurty but didn't set up. I may mess with it again
    now that I've decided to eat yogurt regularly for health reasons.

    Warning to Barb - read no further

    Tonight I made sliced beets in a yogurt-garlic dressing - an idea I saw
    somewhere, possibly the SF Chronicle, possibly in an article about
    Turkish food but I'm just not sure. Could also be Clifford Wright.
    Hubby raved and used his lamb chop to lick up the last bits of
    yogurt/beet sauce.

    Don't Eastern Europeans eat beets in sour cream? Same thing.

    Leila
     
  4. Goomba38

    Goomba38 Guest

    Leila wrote:

    > Tonight I made sliced beets in a yogurt-garlic dressing - an idea I saw
    > somewhere, possibly the SF Chronicle, possibly in an article about
    > Turkish food but I'm just not sure. Could also be Clifford Wright.
    > Hubby raved and used his lamb chop to lick up the last bits of
    > yogurt/beet sauce.


    Sounds delicious! I love beets, though never thought much of them as a
    kid. Perhaps just a taste one grows up to appreciate?

    Did you add anything other than garlic to your beets/yogurt concoction?
    Goomba
     
  5. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Leila" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Tonight I made sliced beets in a yogurt-garlic dressing - an idea I saw
    > somewhere, possibly the SF Chronicle, possibly in an article about
    > Turkish food but I'm just not sure. Could also be Clifford Wright.
    > Hubby raved and used his lamb chop to lick up the last bits of
    > yogurt/beet sauce.
    >
    > Don't Eastern Europeans eat beets in sour cream? Same thing.
    >
    > Leila



    Leila, are you saying that you put garlic into some yogurt and sliced your
    beets into it?
    This is similar to the raita I use where you use small diced cucumber
    (without seeds) and a little cumin in a yogurt. Yum!

    Even if your beet yogurt/garlic is not as I have reiterated, I think I'll
    try it as I asked -- another wonderful simple dish!
    Yes, I think beets and sour cream go together in Russia.
    Thanks,
    Dee Dee
     
  6. "Leila" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:


    > Now comes the part where everybody fools around with different
    > techniques. The LEbanese way is to bury the pot beneath all the
    > blankets and winter overcoats in the house. Other folks have done
    > things with styrofoam coolers, warm ovens, I don't know what else. I
    > have no experience with that.


    I have a salton yogurt maker. I really like it as it is easy, but you
    could use the oven on a low setting.


    > If you use live yogurt and whole milk, and you get the temp
    > approximately right, you should have yogurt in a few hours, like 8. The
    > longer it sits, the "sourer" it gets.


    I like about 6 hours, not fully sour, not fully sweet.


    > I've had trouble getting my yogurt to set the last times I've done it,
    > but I think I'm out of practice, and I think I was using reduced fat
    > milk. Possibly the yogurt cultures weren't live enough or adulterated.
    > THe stuff tasted yogurty but didn't set up. I may mess with it again
    > now that I've decided to eat yogurt regularly for health reasons.


    Use some powdered milk.

    Here is a recipe that I have not tried but sounds similar to what I make
    using my yogurt maker.

    http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com/yogurt.htm

    --
    ---
    Charles Quinn

    "Choosing the lesser of two evils, is still choosing evil" - Jerry Garcia
     
  7. Leila

    Leila Guest

    Dee Randall wrote:
    > "Leila" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > Tonight I made sliced beets in a yogurt-garlic dressing - an idea I saw
    > > somewhere, possibly the SF Chronicle, possibly in an article about
    > > Turkish food but I'm just not sure. Could also be Clifford Wright.
    > > Hubby raved and used his lamb chop to lick up the last bits of
    > > yogurt/beet sauce.
    > >
    > > Don't Eastern Europeans eat beets in sour cream? Same thing.
    > >
    > > Leila

    >
    >
    > Leila, are you saying that you put garlic into some yogurt and sliced your
    > beets into it?


    More like, I spooned some yogurt over the beets, thought that chopped
    garlic would be good and added that, with some salt. Next time I'll
    pound the garlic in a mortar with the salt, then stir that into some
    yogurt, then pour the dressing over the beets.

    It's not really a raita or yogurt-with-beets; it's beets dressed with
    yogurt.

    > This is similar to the raita I use where you use small diced cucumber
    > (without seeds) and a little cumin in a yogurt. Yum!


    I love yogurt and cumin over rice, never tried it with cukes (Lebanese
    way with cukes and yogurt is to use garlic, mint and olive oil).
     
  8. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Leila" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Dee Randall wrote:
    >> "Leila" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> >
    >> > Tonight I made sliced beets in a yogurt-garlic dressing - an idea I saw
    >> > somewhere, possibly the SF Chronicle, possibly in an article about
    >> > Turkish food but I'm just not sure. Could also be Clifford Wright.
    >> > Hubby raved and used his lamb chop to lick up the last bits of
    >> > yogurt/beet sauce.
    >> >
    >> > Don't Eastern Europeans eat beets in sour cream? Same thing.
    >> >
    >> > Leila

    >>
    >>
    >> Leila, are you saying that you put garlic into some yogurt and sliced
    >> your
    >> beets into it?

    >
    > More like, I spooned some yogurt over the beets, thought that chopped
    > garlic would be good and added that, with some salt. Next time I'll
    > pound the garlic in a mortar with the salt, then stir that into some
    > yogurt, then pour the dressing over the beets.
    >
    > It's not really a raita or yogurt-with-beets; it's beets dressed with
    > yogurt.
    >
    >> This is similar to the raita I use where you use small diced cucumber
    >> (without seeds) and a little cumin in a yogurt. Yum!

    >
    > I love yogurt and cumin over rice, never tried it with cukes (Lebanese
    > way with cukes and yogurt is to use garlic, mint and olive oil).


    Thanks.
    Would you use the Lebanese way with cukes and yogurt & garlic, mint and
    olive oil, in the same way as you did the beets (dressed with yogurt)?
    Dee Dee
     
  9. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    I've never heard of this method. Did it taste different from yogurt
    in grocery stores or Greek yogurt? If not, then you can use some of
    the other methods people have suggested here for making yogurt.

    If it does taste different, then try asking some Brazilian friends or
    family.

    My neighbor is from Brazil and her mother used to make yogurt. The
    next time I see her, I will ask her about this method. But it's
    winter and we don't run into each other so often, so it will be a
    while.


    On 9 Jan 2006 13:11:59 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

    >Hello everyone,
    >
    >I grew up in Brazil. At some point in the late 70's, early 80's, my
    >mother got some yogurt culture from a friend of hers. We had fresh
    >yogurt every day. I hated it, but wanted to love it because it was so
    >exotic. So I ate it. :) Anyway, now, I live in New York, and am
    >craving that fresh yogurt. I haven't found the type of culture my
    >mother had anywhere. Maybe you know about it? I don't know the name of
    >the bacteria, but the thing looked like small curd cottage cheese. It
    >wasn't in powder form, and it never got mixed in with the results. We
    >never ate the culture. It was sort of spongy to the touch, and white.
    >Every once in a while, we had to throw or give some away, because it
    >grew and multiplied. We had it on a clean plastic sieve, poured milk on
    >it, and left it overnight, over a bowl. In the morning, there would be
    >yogurt in the bowl. We would then rinse the culture (and sieve) very
    >carefully, and repeat the whole process. Have you ever heard of this?
    >Do you have any idea of what it was, what it is called, and where I can
    >get some? My mother passed away almost 18 years ago. Unfortunately,
    >there's nobody who would know what I am talking about.
    >
    >Thank you for your help and attention,
    >
    >Rosane.
    >


    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  10. [email protected] wrote:
    > Hello everyone,
    >
    > I grew up in Brazil. At some point in the late 70's, early 80's, my
    > mother got some yogurt culture from a friend of hers. We had fresh
    > yogurt every day. I hated it, but wanted to love it because it was so
    > exotic. So I ate it. :) Anyway, now, I live in New York, and am
    > craving that fresh yogurt. I haven't found the type of culture my
    > mother had anywhere. Maybe you know about it? I don't know the name of
    > the bacteria, but the thing looked like small curd cottage cheese. It
    > wasn't in powder form, and it never got mixed in with the results. We
    > never ate the culture. It was sort of spongy to the touch, and white.
    > Every once in a while, we had to throw or give some away, because it
    > grew and multiplied. We had it on a clean plastic sieve, poured milk on
    > it, and left it overnight, over a bowl. In the morning, there would be
    > yogurt in the bowl. We would then rinse the culture (and sieve) very
    > carefully, and repeat the whole process. Have you ever heard of this?
    > Do you have any idea of what it was, what it is called, and where I can
    > get some? My mother passed away almost 18 years ago. Unfortunately,
    > there's nobody who would know what I am talking about.


    You might be dealing with "kefir" which uses "grains" to culture. Check
    health food stores in your area or look online for a source. Here's a
    quick Google result <http://tinyurl.com/c8skf>

    "Raw unpasteurised or pasteurised, full-cream, low fat or non-fat fresh
    milk is poured into a clean suitable container with the addition of
    kefir grains. The content is left to stand at room temperature for
    approx. 24 hours. The cultured-milk is strained in order to separate and
    retrieve the kefir grains from the liquid-kefir. The grains are added to
    more fresh milk, and the process is simply repeated. This simple process
    can be performed on an indefinite basis... for kefir grains are forever.
    The strained liquid-kefir may either be consumed fresh, refrigerated for
    later use, or ripened at room temperature over a period of days before
    consuming. The ripening process is useful for individuals who wish to
    reduce lactose in their kefir [ for details explaining the simple
    procedure, please follow this link situated on a separate Web Page]."
    <http://users.chariot.net.au/~dna/kefirpage.html>

    Pastorio
     
  11. Thank you everyone for your answers. Wow, I never thought to use yogurt
    sauce on beets. My horizons were not that wide. :) I have always loved
    beets. Gotta try this now.

    OH MY GAWD! That's it. I followed the link to kefir. Thank you, Bob
    Pastorio. You found it for me. Before posting here, I went around my
    area to health food stores, and asked about this. Everyone looked at me
    as if I were speaking greek, or portuguese... Now, I know what to look
    for.

    This is so great. :)

    Rosane.
     
  12. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Bob (this one) wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> Hello everyone,
    >>
    >> I grew up in Brazil. At some point in the late 70's, early 80's, my
    >> mother got some yogurt culture from a friend of hers. We had fresh
    >> yogurt every day. I hated it, but wanted to love it because it was so
    >> exotic. So I ate it. :) Anyway, now, I live in New York, and am
    >> craving that fresh yogurt. I haven't found the type of culture my
    >> mother had anywhere. Maybe you know about it? I don't know the name of
    >> the bacteria, but the thing looked like small curd cottage cheese. It
    >> wasn't in powder form, and it never got mixed in with the results. We
    >> never ate the culture. It was sort of spongy to the touch, and white.
    >> Every once in a while, we had to throw or give some away, because it
    >> grew and multiplied. We had it on a clean plastic sieve, poured milk on
    >> it, and left it overnight, over a bowl. In the morning, there would be
    >> yogurt in the bowl. We would then rinse the culture (and sieve) very
    >> carefully, and repeat the whole process. Have you ever heard of this?
    >> Do you have any idea of what it was, what it is called, and where I can
    >> get some? My mother passed away almost 18 years ago. Unfortunately,
    >> there's nobody who would know what I am talking about.

    >
    >
    > You might be dealing with "kefir" which uses "grains" to culture. Check
    > health food stores in your area or look online for a source. Here's a
    > quick Google result <http://tinyurl.com/c8skf>
    >
    > "Raw unpasteurised or pasteurised, full-cream, low fat or non-fat fresh
    > milk is poured into a clean suitable container with the addition of
    > kefir grains. The content is left to stand at room temperature for
    > approx. 24 hours. The cultured-milk is strained in order to separate and
    > retrieve the kefir grains from the liquid-kefir. The grains are added to
    > more fresh milk, and the process is simply repeated. This simple process
    > can be performed on an indefinite basis... for kefir grains are forever.
    > The strained liquid-kefir may either be consumed fresh, refrigerated for
    > later use, or ripened at room temperature over a period of days before
    > consuming. The ripening process is useful for individuals who wish to
    > reduce lactose in their kefir [ for details explaining the simple
    > procedure, please follow this link situated on a separate Web Page]."
    > <http://users.chariot.net.au/~dna/kefirpage.html>
    >
    > Pastorio



    Thanks Bob; I knew what the OP was talking about, but I didn't remember
    anything to use as a keyword to look it up ("grains", etc.)

    Best regards,
    Bob
     
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