You can't just wash that asbestos right out of your bed

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Marc Lermin, Nov 3, 2003.

  1. Marc Lermin

    Marc Lermin Guest

    You see, it tangles in with other fibers and breaks off into the air gradually! It even stays
    intertwined with your body hair. Think of that next time you lean on a plaster wall. Yes, that
    quaint "plaster and lathe" you thought was superior to sheetrock is 30% asbestos if it was made or
    patched between 1920 and 1980! Ah, the glories of the affectation of being urban vermin! And you
    like playing with the bottom of your shoes while you talk on the phone at work? Just after you
    walked all over that white construction debris on the sidwalk? You got it, dude! 30% asbestos! All
    over your belongings so you can pass it on to your grandchildren as well! Hey, isn't historic
    preservation just grand! Let's preserve all the toxic stuff to pas son to our grandchildren so we
    can say we so nobly resisted urban "sprawl"! Don't tear those toxic antiquities down! We want to
    keep on breathing them! Isn't urban affectation, grand! But then again, if you're reading this, you
    don't know, because urban luddites hate the internet because it keeps them from experiencing the
    stimulation of urban cockaroach life! And speaking of cockaroaches and pidgeons and rodents, your
    smaller fellow urban vermin (that you inevitably eat), they make nesting material from asbestos and
    spread it all over. Yes, you do eat them - they are everywhere in your beloved sprawl-less city! And
    when your office moved, did you see the debris-strwen sidewalk they parked your files on?

    =====
    They used to put asbestos in: bakelite, plaster of Paris, sheetrock joints, ceiling "sand" paint,
    foot-callous pumice, wall shingles, floor tiles, pipe insulation, skyscraper ceiling insulation,
    floortile (black-tar-like) "mastic" (even under ceramic bath tiles), and roofing shingles. They
    spread it with "don't ask, don't tell" electricians and dust-covered workers on your busses and
    dumpster leftovers on your sidewalk.

    __________________________________
    Do you Yahoo!? SBC Yahoo! DSL - Now only $29.95 per month! http://sbc.yahoo.com
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>, Marc Lermin
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You see, it tangles in with other fibers and breaks off
    SNIP!

    Do you personally know anyone who has an asbestos related problem? Do you even know anyone who knows
    anyone who has had an asbestos problem? I bet not.

    The asbestos issue is one of the most over-hyped non-issues of the past century. Tell me what the
    statistics are on the number of people dying every year from asbestos problems.
     
  3. Mark Probert

    Mark Probert Guest

    StampOutDumbPosters wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, Marc Lermin
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>You see, it tangles in with other fibers and breaks off
    >
    > SNIP!
    >
    >
    > Do you personally know anyone who has an asbestos related problem? Do you even know anyone who
    > knows anyone who has had an asbestos problem? I bet not.
    >
    > The asbestos issue is one of the most over-hyped non-issues of the past century. Tell me what the
    > statistics are on the number of people dying every year from asbestos problems.

    I investigate insurance claims, and handled several hundred asbestos related claims a year. I
    believe that my business is a microcosm of the problem in an area where asbestos was routinely used
    for decades.

    I have met numerous people suffering from asbestos related lung disease and mesothelioma. One of the
    standard interview questions is to ascertain whether they are aware of others who have similar
    problems. So far, for atleast the last ten years, this question has always been answered in the
    affirmative.

    Yes, it is a major problem, of the past, causing problems today.

    BTW, my asbestos environmental specialist points out that the amout of exposure is irrelevant, so
    long as there was *one* exposure. Some people are just more succeptible to developing problems.
     
  4. Tdkozan

    Tdkozan Guest

    "Marc Lermin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | You see, it tangles in with other fibers and breaks off into the air gradually! It even stays
    | intertwined with your body hair. Think of that next time you lean on a plaster wall. Yes, that
    | quaint "plaster and lathe" you thought was superior to sheetrock is 30% asbestos if it was made or
    | patched between 1920 and 1980! Ah, the glories of the affectation of being urban vermin! And you
    | like playing with the bottom of your shoes while you talk on the phone at work? Just after you
    | walked all over that white construction debris on the sidwalk? You got it, dude! 30% asbestos! All
    | over your belongings so you can pass it on to your grandchildren as well! Hey, isn't historic
    | preservation just grand! Let's preserve all the toxic stuff to pas son to our grandchildren so we
    | can say we so nobly resisted urban "sprawl"! Don't tear those toxic antiquities down! We want to
    | keep on breathing them! Isn't urban affectation, grand! But then again, if you're reading this,
    | you don't know, because urban luddites hate the internet because it keeps them from experiencing
    | the stimulation of urban cockaroach life! And speaking of cockaroaches and pidgeons and rodents,
    | your smaller fellow urban vermin (that you inevitably eat), they make nesting material from
    | asbestos and spread it all over. Yes, you do eat them - they are everywhere in your beloved
    | sprawl-less city! And when your office moved, did you see the debris-strwen sidewalk they parked
    | your files on?
    |
    | =====
    | They used to put asbestos in: bakelite, plaster of Paris, sheetrock joints, ceiling "sand" paint,
    | foot-callous pumice, wall shingles, floor tiles, pipe insulation, skyscraper ceiling insulation,
    | floortile (black-tar-like) "mastic" (even under ceramic bath tiles), and roofing shingles. They
    | spread it with "don't ask, don't tell" electricians and dust-covered workers on your busses and
    | dumpster leftovers on your sidewalk.
    |

    Well, you're right about everything except you don't bother to mention that the type of asbestos in
    everything you mention isn't the "bad" kind.

    TK
    --
    Cogito ergo bibo
     
  5. On Mon, 23 Jun 2003, StampOutDumbPosters wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, Marc Lermin
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > You see, it tangles in with other fibers and breaks off
    > SNIP!
    >
    >
    > Do you personally know anyone who has an asbestos related problem? Do you even know anyone who
    > knows anyone who has had an asbestos problem? I bet not.
    >
    > The asbestos issue is one of the most over-hyped non-issues of the past century. Tell me what the
    > statistics are on the number of people dying every year from asbestos problems.

    This is a pretty lousy criteria for evaluating this problem. I used to work on ships where
    asbestos was treated pretty cavalierly. Occasionally would walk past rooms where there was a lot
    of dust in the air.

    When I left the shipyard, they gave me a breath capacity test, and a special X-ray and sent me a
    paper declaring my lungs to be asbestos free at the time I left. I'm lucky that nothing has happened
    to me so far, but a friend who retired from there and who did work in those kind of environments for
    years until he was promoted, is developing some asthma problems recently. Unfortunately, his loyalty
    prevents him from claiming any kind of worker compensation from the shipyard.

    --alvin
     
  6. David Hughes

    David Hughes Guest

    TDKozan wrote:
    > "Marc Lermin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > | You see, it tangles in with other fibers and breaks off into the air gradually! It even stays
    > | intertwined with your body hair. Think of that next time you lean on a plaster wall. Yes, that
    > | quaint "plaster and lathe" you thought was superior to sheetrock is 30% asbestos if it was made
    > | or patched between 1920 and 1980! Ah, the glories of the affectation of being urban vermin! And
    > | you like playing with the bottom of your shoes while you talk on the phone at work? Just after
    > | you walked all over that white construction debris on the sidwalk? You got it, dude! 30%
    > | asbestos! All over your belongings so you can pass it on to your grandchildren as well! Hey,
    > | isn't historic preservation just grand! Let's preserve all the toxic stuff to pas son to our
    > | grandchildren so we can say we so nobly resisted urban "sprawl"! Don't tear those toxic
    > | antiquities down! We want to keep on breathing them! Isn't urban affectation, grand! But then
    > | again, if you're reading this, you don't know, because urban luddites hate the internet because
    > | it keeps them from experiencing the stimulation of urban cockaroach life! And speaking of
    > | cockaroaches and pidgeons and rodents, your smaller fellow urban vermin (that you inevitably
    > | eat), they make nesting material from asbestos and spread it all over. Yes, you do eat them -
    > | they are everywhere in your beloved sprawl-less city! And when your office moved, did you see
    > | the debris-strwen sidewalk they parked your files on?
    > |
    > | =====
    > | They used to put asbestos in: bakelite, plaster of Paris, sheetrock joints, ceiling "sand"
    > | paint, foot-callous pumice, wall shingles, floor tiles, pipe insulation, skyscraper ceiling
    > | insulation, floortile (black-tar-like) "mastic" (even under ceramic bath tiles), and roofing
    > | shingles. They spread it with "don't ask, don't tell" electricians and dust-covered workers on
    > | your busses and dumpster leftovers on your sidewalk.
    > |
    >
    > Well, you're right about everything except you don't bother to
    mention that
    > the type of asbestos in everything you mention isn't the "bad" kind.
    >
    > TK

    Well, that and suggesting that asbestos is toxic. It's not. Rather,
    * some * types of asbestos are potentially long duration irritants. And his list of things
    containing asbestos covers only a tiny fraction of known uses.
     
Loading...