You know you're riding into a headwind when ...

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by dkahn400, Feb 27, 2006.

  1. dkahn400

    dkahn400 Guest

    .... a 5lb potato comes rolling along the road towards you (Kennett
    Valley Run). Luckily it had the good sense to be rolling on the correct
    side of the road.

    --
    Dave...
     
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  2. You have to pedal downhill from Glencoe to the ferry.
    (Daylight 1996)

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
    Edgware.
     
  3. davek

    davek Guest

    dkahn400 wrote:
    > ... a 5lb potato comes rolling along the road towards you


    I saw that! Was it really a potato?

    d.
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, davek
    ([email protected]) wrote:
    > dkahn400 wrote:
    > > ... a 5lb potato comes rolling along the road towards you

    >
    > I saw that! Was it really a potato?


    And how did Dave weigh it?

    --
    Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
    A *National* Socialist Government did you say, Mr. Chaplin?
     
  5. dkahn400

    dkahn400 Guest

    davek wrote:
    > dkahn400 wrote:
    > > ... a 5lb potato comes rolling along the road towards you

    >
    > I saw that! Was it really a potato?


    I think it was but I didn't stop to examine it closely. It was
    unusually large for a potato though. Maybe it was a potato-coloured
    turnip?

    --
    Dave...
     
  6. dkahn400

    dkahn400 Guest

    Dave Larrington wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, davek
    > ([email protected]) wrote:
    > > dkahn400 wrote:
    > > > ... a 5lb potato comes rolling along the road towards you

    > >
    > > I saw that! Was it really a potato?

    >
    > And how did Dave weigh it?


    I didn't have to. It seemed to know the weigh by itself.

    Possibly it was Ireland's answer to tumbleweed.

    --
    Dave...
     
  7. dkahn400 wrote:

    > ... a 5lb potato comes rolling along the road towards you (Kennett
    > Valley Run). Luckily it had the good sense to be rolling on the correct
    > side of the road.
    >

    There is no such thing as a tailwind, of course. When you're cycling
    you either have a headwind or you're going really well.
     
  8. Mike Causer

    Mike Causer Guest

    On Mon, 27 Feb 2006 07:15:43 -0800, dkahn400 wrote:

    > davek wrote:
    >> dkahn400 wrote:
    >> > ... a 5lb potato comes rolling along the road towards you

    >>
    >> I saw that! Was it really a potato?

    >
    > I think it was but I didn't stop to examine it closely. It was unusually
    > large for a potato though. Maybe it was a potato-coloured turnip?


    Depends on which Kennet you were near: if it was the Cambridgeshire one
    it would have been a sugar-beet. Available at many roadside locations in
    quantities up to 20 tonnes for immediate pick-up. You want carrots?
    We've got carrots too. I'd avoid piles of onions by the roadside though,
    they seem to be the ones that are rotting -- but you'll know that from the
    smell 500m away!


    Mike
     
  9. Dave Larrington wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, Zog The Undeniable (hrothgar19
    > @yahoo.com) wrote:
    >
    >> There is no such thing as a tailwind, of course. When you're cycling
    >> you either have a headwind or you're going really well.

    >
    > I overheard a couple of the "going really well" types opining that
    > perhaps it would be more sensible if, in order to get their 200 km in,
    > they carried on heading west as far as Weston-super-Mare and got the
    > train back :)


    Which is similar to what I tried on Sunday. After slogging it into a stiff
    north easterly across Romney Marsh and up the Elham valley wind tunnel for
    hours, I decided to head west and go really well to Canterbury where I'd
    catch a train (all cancelled for engineering works). Which meant I had an
    even longer slog across the Thanet marshes, bang into the wind, for another
    hour and a half (nothing but fetch between me and Norway).
     
  10. Ian Blake

    Ian Blake Guest

    On Wed, 1 Mar 2006 11:25:51 -0000, Dave Larrington
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >I overheard a couple of the "going really well" types opining that
    >perhaps it would be more sensible if, in order to get their 200 km in,
    >they carried on heading west as far as Weston-super-Mare and got the
    >train back :)


    Really bad idea. At this time of year there always seems to be rail
    maintenance on the weekend between Taunton and Bristol so the direct
    line which includes Weston-SM is served by buses. Definitiely the
    case this year. I rode the Dunkery Dash on Sunday. I wanted a train
    to Bridgwater and back but had to use indirect trains via Westbury to
    and from Taunton instead.

    Dunkery Dash was a great ride as usual. The Quantocks were clear but
    as soon as we climbed the first Brendon hill all the fields were
    white. (The roads were OK). The turn around control was a little
    early because of ice on the higher part of Dunkery Beacon (highest
    hill on Exmoor)).
     
  11. Ian Blake wrote:

    > Dunkery Dash was a great ride as usual. The Quantocks were clear but
    > as soon as we climbed the first Brendon hill all the fields were
    > white. (The roads were OK). The turn around control was a little
    > early because of ice on the higher part of Dunkery Beacon (highest
    > hill on Exmoor)).


    I rode it last year -- remains of snow on Exmoor then as well. 2 killer
    hills: Brendon and the one on the way back (17%?). The Beacon itself wasn't
    that bad; longish, but an easy gradient.
     
  12. Ian Blake

    Ian Blake Guest

    On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 12:02:45 -0000, "Simon Bennett"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Ian Blake wrote:
    >
    >> Dunkery Dash was a great ride as usual. The Quantocks were clear but

    >
    >I rode it last year -- remains of snow on Exmoor then as well. 2 killer
    >hills: Brendon and the one on the way back (17%?). The Beacon itself wasn't
    >that bad; longish, but an easy gradient.
    >


    I use it to find out how unfit I am.

    3 years ago. I had a break from the bike. Very unfit and heavy.
    Successfully climbed Elworthy hill Bonked big time just after Bishops
    Lydeard so I walked Cothelstone hill.

    2 years ago. I decided to stop and rest halfway up Elworthy hill so I
    would not be so bad later. Climbed Cothelstone without stopping.
    Conditions were hard. Very windy and the Dunkery control was early at
    the cattle grid. My main memory is the momentry loss of control
    everytime I cycled past a farm gate.

    Last year. Pride has returned since the break. Still not a mountain
    goat but despite a bad leg (a crash on ice earlier in the week) I
    climbed all hills without stopping. I think it was colder than this
    year but it was drier and much less snow lying around. My problems
    started on the return near Raleighs Cross. My knee started to feel
    very sore and my nipples were hurting. I climb up Cothelstone and
    descend to the finish. The trains were having the usual maintenance
    problems so I decided to ride to Bristol. I head through Bridgewater
    and over the Somerset levels then the Mendips on the A38. When I get
    to Redhill I was in trouble. My leg knee hurting, I was feeling very
    hungry, very cold, and my nipples were really hurting. I walk up the
    hill then continue into Bristol. On the station I look down my vest,
    I notice my nipples had been bleeding. I have had slightly sore
    nipples on 400k audax but nothing like this. I don't have problem
    with my tits, I'm a bloke!! Anyway when I get home I looked the
    problem up on the web. Apparently this nipple abrasion is quite a
    common problem among marathon runners. Usually male, the fairer sex
    usually have a decent sports bra. Anyway I found these little
    plasters called Nip Guards that fit over the nipple and protect them.
    I use them on cold and long rides.

    This year. I thought I am exceptionally unfit and demonstrably
    overweight. The scales don't lie, unless I close my eyes. However I
    ride the ride without any incident apart from the control being down
    at the cattle grid again. Better, if not spectacular, time than
    expected and I have an easy ride to Taunton. I am not as unfit as I
    think.
     
  13. dkahn400

    dkahn400 Guest

    Ian Blake wrote:

    > Apparently this nipple abrasion is quite a
    > common problem among marathon runners. Usually male, the fairer sex
    > usually have a decent sports bra. Anyway I found these little
    > plasters called Nip Guards that fit over the nipple and protect them.
    > I use them on cold and long rides.


    Very painful when it happens to you. A blob of Vaseline is generally
    enough to prevent it.

    --
    Dave...
     
  14. dkahn400 wrote:
    > Ian Blake wrote:
    >
    >> Apparently this nipple abrasion is quite a
    >> common problem among marathon runners. Usually male, the fairer sex
    >> usually have a decent sports bra. Anyway I found these little
    >> plasters called Nip Guards that fit over the nipple and protect them.
    >> I use them on cold and long rides.

    >
    > Very painful when it happens to you. A blob of Vaseline is generally
    > enough to prevent it.


    Although I do rather like te sound of 'Nip Guards'.

    "Two pairs of Nip Guards, please!"
     
  15. > Which meant I had an even longer slog across the Thanet
    > marshes, bang into the wind, for another hour and a half (nothing but
    > fetch between me and Norway).


    And in the other direction, nothing but cabbages...
     
  16. Mark Thompson wrote:
    >> Which meant I had an even longer slog across the Thanet
    >> marshes, bang into the wind, for another hour and a half (nothing but
    >> fetch between me and Norway).

    >
    > And in the other direction, nothing but cabbages...


    True. And caulis. Not this time of year though.
     
  17. > and my nipples were really hurting

    Ah, the Terror that is nipple rash.

    It's bad enough for blokes, I hate to think what it's like for women.

    <http://public.fotki.com/10041990/cyclingrat/>

    Here we see Jandy modelling the ultimate in nipple protection: zinc oxide
    tape.









    jandy ultimate frisbee disc layout catch drop score worlds action greatest
    copa cabana shot throw

    (the above nonsense is in case he ever googles for himself)
     
  18. Simon Bennett wrote:
    > Mark Thompson wrote:
    >>> Which meant I had an even longer slog across the Thanet
    >>> marshes, bang into the wind, for another hour and a half (nothing
    >>> but fetch between me and Norway).

    >>
    >> And in the other direction, nothing but cabbages...

    >
    > True. And caulis. Not this time of year though.


    Who eats the cabbages? I mean I eat some, but not that much.

    --
    Ambrose
     
  19. >>> And in the other direction, nothing but cabbages...
    >>
    >> True. And caulis. Not this time of year though.

    >
    > Who eats the cabbages? I mean I eat some, but not that much.


    The only reason so many caulis get eaten is because they masquerade as
    mashed potato.

    p.s. The cabbages don't exist - I meant cauliflowers, but a childhood of
    reading too much Pratchett has confused the endless cauliflower fields of
    Thanet with the cabbage fields of wossname (Sto Lat?).

    While I'm wittering, it's believed that the endless and impassable
    cauliflower fields around Thanet were sown and maintained for much the same
    reason as the river Swale was dug around Sheppey.
     
  20. Mark Thompson wrote:

    > While I'm wittering, it's believed that the endless and impassable
    > cauliflower fields around Thanet were sown and maintained for much
    > the same reason as the river Swale was dug around Sheppey.


    To keep out the undesirables?
     
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