you people out there riding double or tripple?



lokstah

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Sep 30, 2003
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I think it's come to a don't ask, don't tell policy, folks. We all need to install chainring covers on our road bikes.
 

dhk

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Sep 1, 2003
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Originally posted by DiabloScott
I'd say the guy with the double is in denial and he needs a triple too. If that were me getting beat by a guy with a triple I'd drop major bucks on a compact crank on my way home.

The other option I see frequently recommended is to go XT/XTR derailleur and a 32t big cog. That's a cheaper choice than a new crank for those in triple-denial.

Just more triple-trolling. How come you triple guys are so defensive?;)

No defensiveness here. But when a younger, stronger guy comes on belittle those of us that need a triple to climb the big mountains, it sounds just a little like bragging.

Understand not everyone needs a triple. One of my riding partners is in his mid-thirties, and weighs 140 lbs at 6'3". His low is the classic 39/23, and he can grind up everything I've seen in it. But, I'm 20 years older and 30 lbs heavier. The 30/25 I run now helps me stay a lot closer to him on the hard climbs than I used to with my double.

If I had LA's steady 500 W output capability, I'd climb the 10% mountain grades in 39/23 just like he does....at 12-15 mph. But, I figure I can only make about half of his sustained power, so that 2/3's of his gear would seem more than enough for me.

Note having a triple doesn't mean you have to slow down and get dropped on every hill. Out with the club on shorter rides, I still like to power over the rollers in the big ring and hang with the pack just as much as ever.

My only suggestion would be to run the gearing you need for what you climb and how you ride. Your overall performance is what matters, not how much your chainrings and cogs resemble those in the pro peleton.
 

thumbs

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Apr 9, 2004
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Originally posted by dhk
Having the triple doesn't mean you use it as an excuse to slow down and loaf up every hill.

Why not? I got mine for exactly that reason.

I'm terribly impressed by the amazing strength and speed many of you claim to have, and I hope that if you ever get a triple no one notices. For some, it seems, riding preference and ability is a source of great shame and embarassment. For those people, I highly recommend a double, and nothing biger than 23 in the back, please. Lance doesn't use easier gears; why should you?
 

dhk

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Sep 1, 2003
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Originally posted by thumbs
Originally posted by dhk
Having the triple doesn't mean you use it as an excuse to slow down and loaf up every hill.

Why not? I got mine for exactly that reason.

I'm terribly impressed by the amazing strength and speed many of you claim to have, and I hope that if you ever get a triple no one notices. For some, it seems, riding preference and ability is a source of great shame and embarassment. For those people, I highly recommend a double, and nothing biger than 23 in the back, please. Lance doesn't use easier gears; why should you?

My apologies. Should have said "....you don't HAVE to use it as an excuse to slow down and loaf up every hill." I use my triple when I want to take it easy too, like on a recovery ride day. My only point was that just having the triple doesn't mean you have to stop climbing as hard and as fast as you want to.
 

beels99

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Apr 12, 2004
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I think it's come to a don't ask, don't tell policy, folks. We all need to install chainring covers on our road bikes.

Thats a great idea :)

I for one am currently riding a double on an old univega, but my next bike (buying one in the next 2 weeks) is gonna be a triple almost definitely. I don't feel the IMMENSE weight that it adds will outweigh the fact that I get a lower range of gearing AND it makes it easier to find "That perfect gear"
 

ejglows

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Apr 3, 2004
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Originally posted by Kaboom
What kind of cranks are you riding?

Double crank...just ordered a new bike and wouldnt have it any other way...I like the idea of riding a woman`s bike with two gears...makes me feel like a man! Or at least they give me more respect when I ride with `em...God knows I wouldnt want to be a man...*grins
 

thumbs

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Apr 9, 2004
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Originally posted by dhk
My only point was that just having the triple doesn't mean you have to stop climbing as hard and as fast as you want to.

True enough. Having the gearing options means that you not only get to choose, you have to choose.
 

yak

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May 17, 2004
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well, time to jump into the great crank thread. (without getting cranky)

I'm not knocking anyone who prefers a double, my backup bike is.

My main bike is a Lemond, and came with a triple crank and 12-25 gearing. Having the triple has allowed me to change the gearing to a nice corncob 11-21 and still have some bailout for insane grades. Last time I used the triple was last summer on Mt Greylock.

And I prefer having my "everyday" small ring a 42 vs the 39. Would I use the 53 that comes with the double as much as the 52? Probably not, although a 53-11 would rock on insane descents.
 

fushman

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Feb 13, 2004
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Originally posted by yak
well, time to jump into the great crank thread. (without getting cranky)

I'm not knocking anyone who prefers a double, my backup bike is.

My main bike is a Lemond, and came with a triple crank and 12-25 gearing. Having the triple has allowed me to change the gearing to a nice corncob 11-21 and still have some bailout for insane grades. Last time I used the triple was last summer on Mt Greylock.

And I prefer having my "everyday" small ring a 42 vs the 39. Would I use the 53 that comes with the double as much as the 52? Probably not, although a 53-11 would rock on insane descents.

why have a triple if youre gonna mark on your calander the days you had to use the granny
 

Trekker2017

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Apr 23, 2004
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Tripple... because I'm 55 years old, 240 pounds and it makes it easier climbing some of the stupid hills I have to get up on my weekly routes, especially when I'm packing my camera gear.
 

limerickman

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Jan 5, 2004
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EUROSPORT STAGE 18 : GAVIA STAGE :

Today on Eurosports live commentary on the hardest stage of the years Giro (9000 ft climb !!) : Dave Harmon was discussing gear selection with the great Sean Kelly.

Sean was discussing how last year - he led a group of Irish leisure
cyclists arond the TDF Alpine climbs.
Sean readily admitted that without have a triple - HE would not be able to climb those Alpine climbs.
(This man was four times TDF green points jersey winner - and one of the all time greats).

In two weeks time, once again I will be doing the Wicklow 200
and I will meet Sean, as I do each year.
As usual, he will do this event on his double - while I will pack the treble just in case.

If it's good enough for Sean Kelly to have to pack a treble - I suggest that no one can claim that those who pack a treble
are wimps !
 

Beastt

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Sep 19, 2003
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I ride a double on my road bikes but I do know of a few short stretches in this area that quickly stress my ability with a double. If they were much longer a triple would probably be a good idea. There aren't many flat areas where I live but fortunately the climbs are rarely worse than about a 6% grade. There is one short spot about 4-miles in on a mountain where the road suddenly tilts to, as best I can figure, about a 9.2% grade and that spot makes me grind and quickly puts me well over my AT despite the fact that it's only a few hundred yards long. If I had to ride miles of that kind of slope, I'd probably be looking for a triple and a larger top cog.
 

lokstah

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Sep 30, 2003
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Originally posted by limerickman
If it's good enough for Sean Kelly to have to pack a treble - I suggest that no one can claim that those who pack a treble
are wimps !
Triples definitely turn up in elite pro races from time to time; they were fairly popular in last year's Giro (anyone spotting them this year? I've been missing the coverage) and pretty much anywhere else where they are certain to face big walls. They turned up at the SF Grand Prix -- and we'll probably see some in the Tour here and there.

Then again, you and I aren't staking our careers on maintaining 25mph over 10 miles of 15% grade climbing.
 

limerickman

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Jan 5, 2004
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Originally posted by lokstah
Triples definitely turn up in elite pro races from time to time; they were fairly popular in last year's Giro (anyone spotting them this year? I've been missing the coverage) and pretty much anywhere else where they are certain to face big walls. They turned up at the SF Grand Prix -- and we'll probably see some in the Tour here and there.

Then again, you and I aren't staking our careers on maintaining 25mph over 10 miles of 15% grade climbing.

As I said, we're fortunate to get live coverage of all the major tours - today we had the Gavia stage in this years Giro.

I can't say that I say any trebles on the leading contenders bikes.
Before the stage start today, the general consensus was that
most bikes were being fitted with a backwheel selection from
13-25 tooth setup.

Great, great stage today - Garzelli went on a break about 10 kms
from the top of the Gavia and was caught on the the final climb
of the day by Simoni, Honchar, Brad McGee !, Damiano Cunego,
and a new climber with Panaria Emmauele Sella (a great find - and
a great little climber).
Cunego won the stage.

The Dolomites are tough, tough going - harder than the TDF.
But still no sign of any trebles today !!!!!!!!!!!
 

lokstah

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Sep 30, 2003
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Garzelli was amazing. What a heartbreaker. That he melted away on the last climb was reassuring proof he's not on drugs, though. Six years ago a guy in his place would have kept the pace of his initial attack all the way through the next three climbs, and not gotten off of his bike until reaching the hotel.

:)
 

ProfTournesol

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Aug 22, 2003
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Originally posted by limerickman
As

I can't say that I say any trebles on the leading contenders bikes.
Before the stage start today, the general consensus was that
most bikes were being fitted with a backwheel selection from
13-25 tooth setup.


But still no sign of any trebles today !!!!!!!!!!!


Good effort by Brad:)
If I had a mechanic to select and install custom gear sets for each ride I did, I wouldn't bother with a triple either:)
 

limerickman

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Jan 5, 2004
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Originally posted by ProfTournesol
Good effort by Brad:)
If I had a mechanic to select and install custom gear sets for each ride I did, I wouldn't bother with a triple either:)

Brad McGee still had to cycle those mountains though : he still
managed to get over them and he did very well.
 

graf zeppelin

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May 28, 2004
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I'm riding a double and it works fine for me, though I admit to also wishing I had my own personal mechanic. ;)
 

dhk

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Sep 1, 2003
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Originally posted by Beastt
I ride a double on my road bikes but I do know of a few short stretches in this area that quickly stress my ability with a double. If they were much longer a triple would probably be a good idea. There aren't many flat areas where I live but fortunately the climbs are rarely worse than about a 6% grade. There is one short spot about 4-miles in on a mountain where the road suddenly tilts to, as best I can figure, about a 9.2% grade and that spot makes me grind and quickly puts me well over my AT despite the fact that it's only a few hundred yards long. If I had to ride miles of that kind of slope, I'd probably be looking for a triple and a larger top cog.

You've got some long steady climbs out west. Around here many of the climbs are shorter, like 600-1000 ft elevation gain, but many average 10-14%, with "walls" of 20% or more not uncommon. Even with a 30/25 triple, I still have to stand up when the grade goes over 15%, but I can maintain 3-4 mph with much less strain on the legs, as well as less stress on the bar, stem, and frame.