Your Commuter - How did it come to be?

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Hippy, May 28, 2003.

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  1. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    Wondering what everyone commutes on? What features does your bike have that makes it different to
    your race bike/xc bike/dh bike/tourer etc? What mods are you proud of? What items have you fitted
    that make your ride faster or better or easier?

    Just to start, my commuter is simply my old race bike. It's a:
    - Skansen cro-mo road frame with dodgy identifying stickers removed.
    - "prone to dropping chains" Biopace with new 6or7? speed cluster and new chain. New bits improved
    chain droppage/slip.
    - Bent forks from 1st race & 1st race crash (riding no hands requires some major leaning! :) )
    - Cheapie(c) alu wheels w/ Break-a-lot(tm) spokes.
    - Yellow Vredestein tyres (~$40ea, I think) with "tread".
    - $15 "noname" saddle, swapped from "fatty" exercise bike-style one.
    - Tiny front flashing light (1 white LED, keyring style) and Cateye 2 x C-cell front light.
    - Cheapie(c) rear red flasher so the cars know where to aim.
    - Alu micro-adjust seatpost because the old-style one with bolts in the sides ripped knicks, knicks
    that cost as much as the bike!
    - Exage 300 brakes.. um, for stopping. Some of us stop at lights :)
    - SPD/Flat pedals, off a 2nd-hand GT MTB I bought... tasty.
    - The Rattler headset, makes lots of noise over bumps, must tighten.

    hip a.k.a "bored"
     
    Tags:


  2. hippy wrote:
    >
    > Wondering what everyone commutes on?

    My bike {:)

    > What features does your bike have that makes it different to your race bike/xc bike/dh
    > bike/tourer etc?

    I don't race, even downhill, but it is my xc/mtb/tourer/commuter It is a Graecross Jackaroo, circa
    1984 {:). Okay, I've replaced the triple and rear cassette to my liking.

    > What mods are you proud of?

    Battery and 50/20w headlight, with 20/6w tail light & 2x20W bush track lights.

    > What items have you fitted that make your ride faster or better or easier?

    2.25" tyres. Campbelltown city Council has bloody awful foot paths (yep I use them for 500 metres of
    very busy and badly lit road.) They also have lips up to 3" on foot path thingos.

    Started with front and rear racks for full paniers, plus handlebar bag, for touring. Now pulling my
    second home built bob style trailer. Wonderful for shopping, carrying the welding foreign order to
    TAFE, etc. hint, do not ever give local kids rides in it(the request never end - say pre school
    only {:).

    > hip a.k.a "bored"

    obviously {:)}}}}
    --
    Terry Collins {:)}}} email: terryc at woa.com.au www: http://www.woa.com.au Wombat Outdoor
    Adventures <Bicycles, Computers, GIS, Printing,
    Publishing>

    "People without trees are like fish without clean water"
     
  3. hippy <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Wondering what everyone commutes on? What features does your bike have that makes it different to
    : your race bike/xc bike/dh bike/tourer etc? What mods are you proud of? What items have you fitted
    : that make your ride faster or better or easier?

    - Gemini frame: cro-mo, bit heavier(!) than my Merida; nicely compliant; has threaded derailleur
    mount on dropout.
    - 700 bitsa wheels: 2-cross front wheel which I built myself
    - GT seat; nicely comfy, even in work pants and undies
    - barend shifters on drop bars - 6-speed
    - Biopace 42/53 chainrings
    - $10.00 Acme computer
    - SPD road pedals - nice but minimal float
    - best mod for commuting was fitting a MTB cassette with 28T sprocket to climb up that unavoidable
    last 200m to my office
    - Exage sport groupset
    - proud of the front wheel and barends - originally had those fitted to the ends of my own version
    of bullhorn bars.

    Originally had a MTB commuter but ended up feeling disastisfied with the gearing.

    I'm planning on riding my fixed wheel bike to work on the next commute ride: 76 gear inches and
    singles; brakes both ends; Look pedals - love this bike but hate the downhills until I can get my
    cadence over 120rpm.

    Cheerz, Lynzz
     
  4. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    "Terry Collins" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Battery and 50/20w headlight, with 20/6w tail light & 2x20W bush track lights.

    That's some serious lighting! Home-made, I assume? Using a Fat Hippy design or your own?

    I get all motivated to build some and then never quite get around to doing it.. mmm 50w commuter :)

    I think my commuter's lights are inadequate, especially the fronts. I am currently looking for a
    VistaLite Nightstick battery mount so that I can fit my 2 x 15W VistaLights to it. The company is
    arguing with the distributor or something, so no products are coming in at the moment,
    unfortunately. :-(

    hip
     
  5. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    "Lindsay Rowlands" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > - 700 bitsa wheels: 2-cross front wheel which I built myself

    Wheel building, something else I want to try but will most likely never bother.. so lazy! :)

    > - barend shifters on drop bars - 6-speed

    These are kind of funky.. my race bike had these before I bought the frame and had STI fitted. Much
    better than the downtube shifters that I have on my commuter.

    > - $10.00 Acme computer

    Me: $100 bike w/ $600 Polar HRM :)

    > Originally had a MTB commuter but ended up feeling disastisfied with the gearing.

    I did heaps of commuting on my slicked up, rigid mtb too. Even got to the point of fitting panniers!
    It has now lost its "don't scratch me I'm new" appeal and is in proper MTB form with some serious
    knobbage on the tyres, suspension fork re-installed, etc :)

    > I'm planning on riding my fixed wheel bike to work on the next commute ride: 76 gear inches and
    > singles; brakes both ends; Look pedals - love this bike but hate the downhills until I can get my
    > cadence over
    120rpm.

    This is something I want to try. I'm keen to try racing track but chicken when it comes to fixies so
    I want to build one and ride it around "quietly" before attempting the race thang. When going down a
    big hill.. what do you do? Just brake if it gets going too fast or can you control its speed with
    just your legs?

    Thinking out loud: I could have two sets of wheels for my good mtb, one for commuting and one for
    mtb'ing. This would free up my current roadie commuter for a fixie conversion... hmm.. Is it
    possible to buy all the parts needed to do this or will I need to have some special tracks-ends?
    welded onto the frame?

    hip
     
  6. troyq

    troyq New Member

    Joined:
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    I ride a GT Pantera (97' i think) mtb and out of every bike i've ever ridden, this one has that 'fit'. Literally everything on it has been upgraded (or downgraded in the case of the forks which are now cro-mo instead of suspended) except the frame which I hope never changes.

    Put risers on not long ago and it definately adds 'cruise' to my riding style.

    I think the thing that makes all the difference though is slicks and tyre liners. I would recommend both but more so the tyre liners to anyone that doesnt already have them for commuting - they will save you MUCH time.
     
  7. Shabby

    Shabby New Member

    Joined:
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    8 speed Avanti sprint. Was 16 speed, but I need to work on my cadence, so I took off the 53. People still ask whether I'm a junior, even though I'm over 6 foot.

    Purple (with chunks of aluminium showing through) with blue forks, which were upgraded (?) after a unforseen adventure off a ten step drop. (Which has subsequently been bollarded off due to public liability issues of having a 96kg bloke go flying into a nearby cafe at about 35km/h).

    Polar s710i, becuase I only ride my other bike when I race, so I need the data on training, not when I race.

    Twin Smart lights with massive battery pack, which adds to my climbing ability.

    New shimano wheels, after destroying multiple hubs and rims.

    Mismatching cranks (one side generic, one side RX100). Yes, I'm so strong I broke my crank. (With a hacksaw because it's thread was buggered and I needed to change the bottom bracket.)

    Running gear: Rx100 brakes and RHS crank, Ultegra front derailleur (which only gets used to stop the chain flying off anyway, seeings I only ave one chainring). At one stage, it had every Shimano groupset from Rx100 to DuraAce on it.

    "It may be a piece of sh*t, but it's my piece of sh*t" - Cameron from Ferris Bueller.
     
  8. Andy Simpson

    Andy Simpson Guest

    "Terry Collins" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]... <gone>
    > Okay, I've replaced the triple and rear cassette to my liking.
    >
    > > What mods are you proud of?
    >
    > Battery and 50/20w headlight, with 20/6w tail light & 2x20W bush track lights.

    What batteries do you need for all that ?

    Andy
     
  9. hippy <[email protected]> wrote:

    : Thinking out loud: I could have two sets of wheels for my good mtb, one for commuting and one for
    : mtb'ing. This would free up my current roadie commuter for a fixie conversion... hmm.. Is it
    : possible to buy all the parts needed to do this or will I need to have some special tracks-ends?
    : welded onto the frame?

    An older road frame with (near) horizontal dropouts is all that's needed. I have a Raleigh Flyer
    frame and fork hanging in the garage I'll give to you!

    Here's what I did to make a fixed wheeler: used an old Sugino 65mm crankset and hacksawed off the 52
    rivetted-on steel chainring; got a 14T track rear sprocket
    (1/8") and screwed it onto the freewheel hub - with serious amounts of loctite; followed that with a
    BB lockring and ditto for the loctite. Use a chainwhip to tighten the sprocket very tight and use
    whatever you have to tighten the lockring seriously too.

    I took some time adjusting the spacers and dishing on the rear wheel to get perfect chainline.
    Bought a cheap BMX 1/8" chain for about $8 and was ready to go. I fitted brakes back and front -
    don't let anyone tell you that you don't need 'em. Oh, I swapped out the QR rear axle for a solid
    one and used washers and nuts to keep the wheel in place. A cheapo 15mm spanner sits in the seatpack
    for the inevitable roadside puncture repair - I'm running singles so carry a spare tyre too.

    I picked up some Look compatible Shimano pedals on eBay and had a package raring to go.

    Now, riding a fixie is very different to a typical roadie. You HAVE TO pedal the whole ride, and if
    you forget and try to take a rest the bike will just about push your knee through the top of your
    head - no jest.

    Once adjusted to the eccentricities, riding a fixed wheel bike is a spiritual experience. There's no
    gears to worry about so it's a matter of keeping a good cadence you can manage on the flat, mashing
    up hills and keeping your speed in check on the downhills - that's what the brakes are for.

    It's very easy to get to the point of feeling out of control going down steeper hills and the brakes
    are the only thing that will save you. It is possible to apply some back pressure on the pedals, but
    not when your cadence is around 120rpm. The bike will try to spit you off if you can't maintain
    pedal speed.

    I've found that riding the fixie has improved my cadence, made me stronger up hills and I tend to
    stay in the same gear longer on the roadie. Also a 20k ride on a fixie feels like an intense 40k
    ride on the roadie.

    I'm serious about the Raleigh. It's a 56cm c-c.

    Cheerz, Lynzz
     
  10. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    "troyq" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I ride a GT Pantera (97' i think) mtb and out of every bike i've ever

    I have a GT Talera.. dunno about the vintage though. Cro-mo, cantis, 7spd, nothing special but
    useful :).

    > ridden, this one has that 'fit'. Literally everything on it has been upgraded (or downgraded in
    > the case of the forks which are now cro-mo instead of suspended) except the frame which I hope
    > never changes.

    Get out your tape measure, pen, paper, etc and MEASURE IT! If it's that good, you'll want to use
    those measurements for any other bikes you buy, right? I'd write them down and use them for a
    custom frame :)

    > I think the thing that makes all the difference though is slicks and tyre liners. I would
    > recommend both but more so the tyre liners to anyone that doesnt already have them for commuting -
    > they will save you MUCH time.

    When I was using my Avanti MTB4ROAD I had Vredestein S-Licks... very fast! Single best upgrade you
    can make to an MTB commuter. Are tyre liners for puncture protection? I ride next to a train line
    and have bike shops near work and home so it's not such an issue for me.

    hip
     
  11. Nickzx6r

    Nickzx6r Guest

    <snip>

    > Are tyre liners for puncture protection? I ride next to a train line and have bike shops near work
    > and home so it's not such an issue for me.

    > hip

    I'll probably anger the puncture gods by saying this, but in the 15000kms or so that I've used tyre
    liners I've had only three flats.

    Two were from the same worn rim tape (several years ago) and the last was only a couple of weeks
    ago. I never could find the cause of that one but hte hole was right along the tube's seam and the
    tube had been in that tyre since the tyre was new about 4000kms ago.

    So, I reckon they're a good investment. BTW, I only have a tyre liner in the rear tyre.

    --
    Nick
     
  12. Bah

    Bah Guest

    NickZX6R <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I'll probably anger the puncture gods by saying this, but in the 15000kms or so that I've used
    > tyre liners I've had only three flats.

    I can tell you all for free that conti avenue semislicks have about the puncture resistance of hot
    cheese. They might be workable with liners but I just swapped on some irc metro duros.

    Bah.
     
  13. hippy wrote:
    >
    > "Terry Collins" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Battery and 50/20w headlight, with 20/6w tail light & 2x20W bush track lights.
    >
    > That's some serious lighting! Home-made, I assume? Using a Fat Hippy design or your own?

    Home made and yes Fat Hippy & Moz are to blame {:). What follows is a bit long, but essentially
    gives the story.

    I grew up on bottle generators, then purchased a Sturney Archer Hub, then a Sanyo bottom bracket
    model. All intermingled with various standard battery operated lights and piles of reflectors (1/2"
    - 8") over the years.

    I've also built a system for the generators that utilised full wave rectification and rechargeable
    batteries (4xC), which was modified to include a voltage doubler because I'm such a slow rider.

    All these systems over the years can best be described as something to help aware drivers see you
    and maybe you could identify what you were about to hit. Anyway, I'm in my forties now and my
    eyesight is not as good as it once was.

    Last year, I decide to do some hobby studies at TAFE and broaden my range of welding skills
    (thinking model live steam engines, bicycle racks, bicycle trailers and maybe bicycle frames
    eventually). Thus, two nights a week I am driving to TAFE and start thinking that I should be going
    by bicycle, especially since I find a route that is largely off road or back streets.

    It only takes one trawl through the collection of old lights and generators to realise that it is
    going to have to be a rechargeable battery system. My initial lighting system was my old Union,
    Sanyo, etc 6v halogen lights from the generator days onto a very little gel 6v battery a few
    years old. It is fiddly and not too reliable and quickly reminds me of what I disliked about the
    old lights.

    So whilst doing a bit internet research I come across Fat Hippy's and Moz's pages and some others.
    Ok, I buy the towball cap and a couple of halogens and think about putting it all together. Firstly
    I change tack from the tow ball design and decide to build a metal box/cover around a centre and
    side lights set up. Eventually I add a top light that is a halogen car spot (hint dump the car
    globes as they are really 14v). So that is how it all "evolved". All are individually switched - the
    switch box is an evolving design atm.

    The battery I am currently running is a 12v 18Amphour SLA from Jaycar, with one of their "automatic
    plug pack chargers. It is weighty at 6kg, but is economical and within budget. In fact, any one
    could buy a smaller SLA and the automatic charger and be safe in fiddling with it, so long as you
    understand how to wire a circuit.

    I've used NiCads and other batteries over the years and recognise they are lighter, but expensive
    for the same capacity and of limited life span. Picky on discharge and recharge as well.

    The SLA size is a compromise. Theoretically I should have a 60Amphour to run 50W front and 20W
    rear. These are my really bright lights intended for very busy roads with lots of cross lights from
    signs, etc. A 50W also is good for up to 40Kms/hr on the darkest road with my bad eyesight. On my
    commute, I only run this for 10 minutes max as I leave TAFE, so I wasn't too worried about over
    extending the battery.

    My normal lighting is the 20W front and 6W rear, which is just over the
    C/10 rating of the SLA. (C is the Amphour rating) The front light is good for me to 25kms/hr on dark
    roads and covers all the back streets and grass fields I cover riding home.

    The two x 20W side lights were intended for bush track riding. They are angled off to give a broad
    pool of light for when I have weave and dodge. They work a lot better than the single light.

    The rear also has a 6 LED emergency flasher mounted on a plate that bolts to the rack. Someone
    claimed that the flashing light attracts the drivers attention, but the solid light is necessary for
    them to judge the distance. So, I have them both. It really is cheap insurance and a hell of a lot
    cheaper than medical bills. Also, I ride with a white Bell helment and reflective vest.

    Okay, this battery is weighty, especially when I'm also pulling one of my home built bob style
    trailers, but it can handle everything at once and it is quite good for training, i.e I zoom along
    when I take it off {:).

    Future plans are to build my own led lights, which should lighten the battery load. I'm also
    interested in the Luxeon (?) 50W & 32W led lights mentioned is Silicon Chip magazine recently.

    It is unlikely I will ever get a lighter battery, as I want to start taking along a GPS enable
    laptop for detailed route logging on my day rides.

    Someday, this will get onto my www pages complete with the photos.

    --
    Terry Collins {:)}}} email: terryc at woa.com.au www: http://www.woa.com.au Wombat Outdoor
    Adventures <Bicycles, Computers, GIS, Printing,
    Publishing>

    "People without trees are like fish without clean water"
     
  14. Chester1

    Chester1 New Member

    Joined:
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    My commuter is 21 years old, the only original parts being the frame and forks. It started life with a coaster brake, then I fitted a five speed cluster with friction levers, and now it has a 7 speed with indexed downtube levers..doesn't change perfectly but it works ok.

    It has aluminium rims (27 x 1 1/4) and non stainless spokes that are so old now they are beginning to break..I have replaced 3 so far in the back wheel. The group set is a mixture of Exchage, RX100 and RSX mainly, along with a few nameless bits. K Mart tyres with thick treads (at least they look thick) which makes it good for the bumps, gutters, glass and potholes on the way to work. I have Mr Tuffys inside the tyres for extra protection against punctures. I use SPD pedals. The headlight and tailight are Cateye (halogen on the front and an old but bright 3 LED number on the back).

    So its big, old and heavy, (but then I'm big, old and heavy too). I keep the maintenance up to it, so it is well suited for the rough sort of ride to work and home again..short but furious. I'm really rather attached to it, and hope to keep it going for some years yet.
     
  15. Suzy Jackson

    Suzy Jackson Guest

    "Chester1" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > My commuter is 21 years old, the only original parts being the frame and forks. It started life
    > with a coaster brake, then I fitted a five speed cluster with friction levers, and now it has a 7
    > speed with indexed downtube levers..doesn't change perfectly but it works ok.

    Reminds me of the story of the axe...

    My commuter (which I also race on) started life sixteen years ago as a 10 speed Avanti strada, which
    my parents bought for me second hand. This was a cheap lugged steel bike, with no-name components
    and chromed steel (yuck!) 27" rims.

    One of the first upgrades I made to it was to fit downtube levers in place of the original stem
    mounted levers. I used the original Shimano 105 ones. I also fitted a matching 105 front and rear
    derailleur. Next I bought a cheap SR alloy stem and Suntour alloy cranks.

    After a year or so, the back wheel packed it in, so I built a new wheel with a Suntour hub and Nisi
    rim. This was the first wheel I ever made. I laced it 36 x four cross because the book I had on
    wheel building (De la Rosa and Kolin) said that was the way you were supposed to do it.

    Unfortunately that wheel didn't last very long. Just a few months later, I snapped the frame. I went
    bikeless for a few months, while I saved up for a "decent" frame. I chose a Tange-2 lugged steel
    frame this time, and transferred all my parts to it. The wheels wouldn't fit (being 27" rather than
    700c) so I built a new set with Mavic MA4 rims and my first ever Campy parts, a pair of Athena hubs.
    These ones were laced 36 x 3 cross, with DT double butted spokes.

    Over the next few years, I replaced most of the other components, mainly with newer Shimano 600 and
    105, or with Campy Athena. The old bars went in favour of a set of Cinelli "Giro de Italia" bars,
    and a matching Cinelli XA stem, and I found some 105 aero brake levers cheap at a bike shop. The
    gearing went from the original five speed, to six (when I bought the new frame) to seven speeds, and
    I even went indexed with a pair of 600 levers.

    I also got into racing a bit, and found a pair of single rims, which I laced 28 x 2 cross to Suntour
    superb hubs with aero spokes. At much the same time, I bought a pair of Open 4 CD rims to lace up as
    general purpose wheels.

    More recently I was looking in a bike shop, and noticed they had a pair of eight speed Campy Chorus
    hubs on sale. I already had a set of rims that would suit at home, so I snapped them up, and laced
    up a pair of wheels with my Open 4 CD rims and these new Chorus hubs, laced 32 x 3 cross with DT
    double butted spokes. I found out pretty quickly that eight speed had been discontinued by Campy,
    and the cassettes were a tad hard to find, so I ordered a nine speed freehub assembly to go on the
    hub (there goes the saving!) and put a nine speed cassette on. I ran my old seven speed levers in
    friction mode with this wheel for about a fortnight before swapping the derailleurs to Campy Chorus,
    and buying a pair of Record nine speed down-tube levers to index with the new nine speed cassette.

    Now being built in the late eighties, and also being built when I was a teenager, and everyone
    thought I was still growing, the frame was always too big for me. A couple of years ago I rectified
    this by buying a third frame. This one is my current frame; a Colnago Dream Plus. Of course my old
    headset and bottom bracket wouldn't fit on this, it being threadless and Italian, and nor would the
    stem and seatpost. I was a bit annoyed to find that they'd also quietly changed the diameter of
    handlebars in the intervening period, so had to get new handlebars. This time I went for a Record
    bottom bracket (it was on sale), Chorus headset, Chorus seatpost, ITM millennium stem, and ITM "pro
    260" bars. There were no mounts for my lovely downtube levers, so I splurged and went ergo, with a
    set of Record ergos (pre carbon) which I picked up for a song.

    Since then I've continued to replace bits, either as they wear out, as they break, but mainly when I
    see something in a bike shop that I simply must have. The brake callipers went fairly quickly,
    replaced by Campy Chorus differential ones, and more recently I replaced the bars (bent in a crash)
    with Deda ones, and the seatpost with a pretty carbon fibre Record one. People give me funny looks
    when I refer to my Colnago race bike as a "bitsa" but in reality that's what it is. Just nice bits.

    Now I'm looking at building another set of wheels, with Chorus or Record hubs and Open pro rims,
    that I can set aside for racing only, so I don't wear out those expensive racing tyres quite so
    quickly by commuting on them. In the meantime I rebuilt my old Tange frame bike with my old seven
    speed wheels and derailleurs, with the intention of commuting on that. Of course I don't, and it
    sits idle in my garage while I ride my race bike to work. I can't bear to part with it though, as it
    has far more sentimental value than the couple of hundred dollars someone would pay for it.

    I really hate to think how much money I've passed over the counter of the various bike shops I've
    frequented over the last couple of decades.

    Regards,

    Suzy

    --
    ---
    Suzy Jackson [email protected] http://www.suzyj.net
     
  16. hippy wrote:
    > Wondering what everyone commutes on?

    My all-time favourite commuting bike was stolen from outside a pub in Leeds in about 1987.

    It was a Raleigh 531 frame and fork in almost-but-not-quite-racing-bike geometry with cantilever
    brakes added and enough space for mudguards and fairly fat tyres.

    It had a front low-rider pannier rack, and best of all, it had a Sturmey-Archer three-speed *fixed*
    hub gear, a rare and wonderful piece of kit that SA long ago stopped making because only a few
    loonies understood the point of them (and because they were finicky things with a tendency to find
    neutral gears where there should be none).

    Oh, and it was painted a really tasteless piggy pink powdercoat that you didn't have to get very
    close to see the red and white pigments in.
     
  17. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    "Lindsay Rowlands" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > An older road frame with (near) horizontal dropouts is all that's needed.
    I have
    > a Raleigh Flyer frame and fork hanging in the garage I'll give to you!

    That's very generous of you. :)

    > Here's what I did to make a fixed wheeler: used an old Sugino 65mm
    crankset and

    Is the 65mm crankset important or is that just 'your' size?

    > hacksawed off the 52 rivetted-on steel chainring; got a 14T track rear
    sprocket
    > (1/8") and screwed it onto the freewheel hub - with serious amounts of
    loctite;
    > followed that with a BB lockring and ditto for the loctite. Use a
    chainwhip to
    > tighten the sprocket very tight and use whatever you have to tighten the lockring seriously too.

    Is that 14T track sprocket the same as a BMX sprocket? How did you decide the gear ratio? What is
    the reason for the BB lockring - just another level of protection to stop the sprocket coming loose?

    > I took some time adjusting the spacers and dishing on the rear wheel to
    get
    > perfect chainline. Bought a cheap BMX 1/8" chain for about $8 and was
    ready

    Is it really necessary to mess with the dishing? Could I simply space the sprocket
    in/out or will this not leave enough thread for the sprocket to hold on to?

    > Now, riding a fixie is very different to a typical roadie. You HAVE TO pedal the whole ride, and
    > if you forget and try to take a rest the bike will just about push your knee through the top of
    > your head - no jest.

    hmm sounds like fun... not! ;-)

    > It's very easy to get to the point of feeling out of control going down steeper hills and the
    > brakes are the only thing that will save you. It is possible to apply some back pressure on the
    > pedals, but not when your cadence is around 120rpm. The bike will try to spit you off if you can't
    > maintain pedal speed.

    Hmm, if/when I get one of these built, it'll be a good test of my spinning ability!

    > I'm serious about the Raleigh. It's a 56cm c-c.

    Hey, that's my size too! :) Do you live in/near Melbourne?

    Cheers for that... fixie and home-made lights will be built before I die, I promise ;-)

    hip
     
  18. Steppenw

    Steppenw Guest

    SuzyJ, you're a legend. I like that you're about evolution (repair or upgrade) rather than
    revolution (open the wallet and spend).

    You've inspired me to attempt to build my first set of wheels. Well, they won't be any >less<
    straight than my current pair of potato-crisps.

    As for commuting? How unlucky can you be - I work 500m from home. Then again, I get to ride the
    trails at lunchtime, so it all works out in the end.
     
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