Your favourite book/lierature.

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by limerickman, Nov 2, 2007.

  1. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    In my opinion, one of the most important things that any human being can do is to be able to read.
    The ability to read informs, ones ability to learn.
    Reading allows a person the chance to learn, to get an education.

    But in other ways, reading can liberate a person and open them up to new experiences, new locations, allows them to visit times past and it allows access to thoughts and deeds of people, with whom they may never have any contact with.
    One may never get the chance to visit Antartica - but read Ernest Shackelton's biography and you're immediately placed in that desolate location.
    Thankfully many of us will never experience the life of a soldier in WW1 - but read Sassoon or Wilfred Owen and one is transported back to a time/place which can only be regarded as hellish.

    Which books have you read and which you could say have made a great impression on you?

    My list would have to include the following (in no particular order) :

    1. 1984, Animal Farm, by George Orwell.
    2. Most of Shakespeares works.
    3. Ulysses by James Joyce
    4. Strumpet City by James Plunkett
    5. Most of Charles Dickens stories.
    6. The Time Machine by HG Wells
    7. Pilgrims Progress by John Bunyan
    8. Catch-22 Joseph Heller
     
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  2. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    In no particular order:
    1. The Gates of the Forest, by Elie Wiesel
    2. The first three Foundation books, by Isaac Asimov
    3. The Metamorphosis, Franz Kafka
    4. Still Life with Woodpecker, Tom Robbins
    5. Illusions, Richard Bach
    6. The entire Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series, by Douglas Adams
    7. The Unbearable Lightness of Being, Milan Kundera
    8. Feynman Lectures on Physics, a three book series, by Richard Feynman
     
  3. Cycler6n

    Cycler6n New Member

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    The Bible, The Far Side gallerys, The Crucible, and Laura Ingalls Wilder
     
  4. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    In no particular order:
    1) Steppenwolf by Herman Hesse
    2) Dracula by Bram Stoker
    3) Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
    4) Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
    5) Oddesy and Iliad by Homer
    6) War and Peace by Leon Tolstoy
    7) Metamorphosis by Franz Kalfka
    8) The entire Lord of the Rings Trilogy and the Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkein
    9) All of the Clive Cussler Novels just for entertainment
    10) The Bicycling Guide to Complete Bicycle Maintenance & Repair for Road & Mountain Bikes by Todd Downs

    Just for a diversion, I love to read Calvin & Hobbs collections. I am also almost finished with a book called The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova which may well be added to this list.
     
  5. coneofsilence

    coneofsilence Member

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    I need to read a bit more.

    The Lord of the Rings by J R R Tolkien.
     
  6. Cycler6n

    Cycler6n New Member

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    No way! I collect Calvin and Hobbes books!
     
  7. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    Yep, my favorite is Scientific Progress Goes Boink! I was crushed when Bill Waterson decided to discontinue the comic strip. I have four different collections but I am sort of saving for the entire works in one hardbound edition. It is as thick as Webster's Unabridged Dictionary and costs $399.00.
     
  8. janiejones

    janiejones New Member

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    I read a book called Mr Popper's Penguins in about year four, and since then I have read loads of stuff from Chaucer onwards, and I still think Mr Popper is the greatest.
     
  9. fujibike

    fujibike New Member

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    John Steinbeck...Grapes of Wrath being my favorite
     
  10. Cycler6n

    Cycler6n New Member

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    Really? that much? I could have sworn it was only $150.
     
  11. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    You have the patience to read Chaucer?????:confused: Did you actually understand what you had read????:confused: Or was it an abridged version.
     
  12. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    I am pretty sure that it was close to $400 when I saw it. I would have paid $150 for it in a heartbeat.
     
  13. janiejones

    janiejones New Member

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    Yeah, I did Chaucer at uni, but I always had the modern English version right next to the "old" English - I would always sit the "old" one on top for my lecturer to see. But actually there is some good stuff in there - pretty raunchy!!!!
     
  14. Scotttri

    Scotttri Member

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    Anything by Bernard Cornwell
     
  15. Fatherzen

    Fatherzen New Member

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    Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert A. Heinlein. My senior English term paper was comparing the Martian religion to Transcendentalism by Thoreau and Emerson.

    Most anything by Shakespeare, Dickens, Steinbeck, or Twain.

    The Hornblower novels and The Good Shepard by C. S. Forester.

    Expecting Someone Taller and anything else by Tom Holt (I just finished Valhalla).

    Animal Farm, 1984, Fahrenheit 451, etc.

    The Hitchhiker's Guide series.

    I am trying to start the books by Robert Rankin, but I have misplaced the first book in the Brentford Trilogy, so I guess I will spend today cleaning my house instead.
     
  16. Richmond Roadie

    Richmond Roadie New Member

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    Great topic!

    I've been a voracious reader for as long as I can remember. Off the top of my head I've been influenced by and enjoyed the following...

    How Should We Then Live- Francis Schaeffer

    The Story of Civilization (10 volumes)- Will & Ariel Durant

    The Bible

    The Mainspring of Human Progress- Henry Grady Weaver

    Our Enemy, The State- Albert J. Nock

    Economics in One Lesson- Henry Hazlitt

    Paul Revere's Ride- David Hackett Fischer
     
  17. Oruboris

    Oruboris New Member

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    Thrilled to see so much Dickens on the list: a favorite of mine, just re-read Our Mutual Friend, am nearly finished with Bleak House. Recently read that he contributed more words to the language than anyone save Shakespeare.

    Love 'Metamorphisis', too. My take on it has always been that Gregor's family were actually better off after he changed. They seem happier when they aren't so dependent.

    I'm a big fan of Conrad and Thackery, Ibsen and O'Neill [love to read plays: big payoff for little time spent].

    For living writers, Steven Brust [though the last 'Vlad' was a let down], Cormac McCArthy [The Crossing is better than The Road], Terry Pratchett [funniest man alive], and Richard Russo [Funny in a different way-- I think he's been spying on me...]

    Oh, you Calvin fans: look out for 'Sheldon' [sheldoncomics.com]-- boy genius downloads language into his pet duck. Hilarity ensues.

    As funny as Calvin? Heck no, and shame on you for asking. Calvin was unique, and couldn't have sustained it's level forever. But Sheldon is usually inteligent, sometimes wise, almost always funny. Free in your Email, if you like.
     
  18. Karl Hungus

    Karl Hungus New Member

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    In no particluar order:

    1. Last of the Mohicans, Cooper
    2. Les Miserables, Hugo
    3. Lord of the Rings, Tolkien
    4. To Kill a Mocking Bird, Lee
    5. David Copperfield, Dickens
    6. On the Road, Kerouac
    7. Dracula, Stoker
    8. Sherlocke Holmes Complete Works, Doyle
    9. Watership Down, Adams
    10. Catcher in the Rye, Salinger
    11. Atlas Shrugged, Rynd

    I could go on and on. I love to read!

    I really must read "Ulysses" sometime but I am waiting to do it when I can audit a college class that's reading it. My wife took a graduate course in English whilein college and the whole semester was spent just on reading Ulysses. Too cool!

    Great stuff and very interesting to see others' lists!
     
  19. slewd22

    slewd22 New Member

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    The Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald
    Anything by Ernest Hemingway
    It's not about the bike - Lance Armstrong

    - These are by no means my favourites, I dont strictly have 'favourites', i just read these recently and thought they were great.
     
  20. stevecycles

    stevecycles New Member

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    1. The Bible
    2. The Left Behind Series by Tim LaHaye and Jerry Jenkins
    3. A Good Walk Spoiled - John Feinstein
    4. Since getting into cycling, anything on the sport!
     
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