Your Longest Ride

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by gntlmn, Oct 22, 2003.

  1. Triplecentury

    Triplecentury New Member

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    Unfortunately you don't avoid saddle sores. I believe that it was on the Planet Ultra (fantastic website) website that I read 'pain is given but suffering is optional. I bled a little for about a week and pretty much healed up a week later.

    Believe it or not, I heard that diaper rash cream promotes healing so I am trying that now and then along with boxer style shorts as they are less constricting.

    A comfortable saddle is a great advantage, but you cannot avoid saddle sores on long rides. I'd love to hear any advice others have on this subject. ]
     


  2. Memphmann

    Memphmann New Member

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    600km, this has to be a joke? Good luck if not.

    Our ride proved painful in many areas, grotch, back, shoulders, neck, and legs. Basically felt like we lost a good bar fight. Oly three of us were willing to ride the next day. It was a shorter 3 hour slow easy spin.

    Developed knee problems when I moved to British Columbia. Those huge mountains were just a joy :). Nothing like climbing an 9% hill and five minutes into ride your legs start to ache. You realize that there still is 30 minutes of climbing left :) That was so enjoyable.....

    Memph
     
  3. Evo

    Evo New Member

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    I was the same....the longest ride I had done is 160km for the Great Melbourne Bike Ride when they still had the long challenge, that was until a couple of weekends ago when I did my first bay in a day.

    My computer showed 213.63km including the few hundred metres to and from the car. It was some of the biggest packs I have ever ridden with, and it meant that up until Frankston, I was running on 2% effort....Awesome! On the way back from Geelong, we had the most awesome tailwind...cruised at about 45km/h again on about 2% effort.
    The bit in the middle was a bit miserable...wet, cold, wet, cold, etc.

    Check out the thread in this forum....give us your story about the ride!
     
  4. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    I hear that the when the riders ride in the mid section of the peloton (the large cluster of riders) on the flats during the Tour de France, the energy expenditure is only 40 % of what they would have if they solo'd. My thought is that a good tail wind to generate those kinds of speeds will beat a draft any day, as long as it keeps blowing at your back. It doesn't take long to put a big dent out of a 600 k ride with an easy 45 kph pace.
     
  5. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    Naah...It's no joke. My inspiration is Chris Kostman who has raced many times the RAAM (Race Across AMerica). This means triple centuries for nine days in a row and all the while racing. I can't remember if it was him, but one guy rode the first 650 miles straight one year before stopping for the customary 2-3 hour rest. I'm no Chris Kostman, but what I am trying is nothing like RAAM, and my only concern about speed is not to lolleygag because it will be a matter of getting it all done before I fall asleep from being up so long. I need to remind myself to use aero bars. I bet you didn't use those in your double century because it sounds like you did it on a lark. They would be a lot easier on your arms and shoulders, not to mention being considerably easier to make way in any headwinds.
     
  6. blocka

    blocka New Member

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    Wow, you all are intimidating, to say the least! I am a newbie rider and have just started cycling on a regular basis. I look forward to some day in the future being able to say I rode for anything close to these distances. In the meantime, I'll enjoy my short rides and dream!
     
  7. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    An easy way to start riding long distances is to go on a bike tour, if you can find the time. The idea is not to get there fast, just to keep on pedaling. You'd be surprised how easy it is and how many foreigners you meet along the way. They'll ride with you and tell you their stories.

    One friend of mine started in Brazil, where he is from, and ended in Alaska, 18,000 miles away. It took him about 2 1/2 years, always pedaling easy, about 10-12 miles an hour.

    Anyway, you'll find yourself doing longer and longer rides without much effort. Even a one or two week tour will put your longest ride up there to a respectable difference. You'd be surprised.
     
  8. nomad

    nomad New Member

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    I've done Vatternrunden in Sweden 5 times (300km), it's awesome having 15999 other people going together around the lake at the same time.
    The longest race I've done is Den Store Styrkeprøven (www.styrkeproven.com). It's 540km and climbs to 1090m along the way (sorry, don't know how much that is in obsolete terms). I took 28 hours but the real racers sometimes do it under 14 hours. Don't you just hate it! :eek:)

    Efter lots of long distance races like these I can still say that I have never had a saddle sore. It was close once after the chamoix in my shorts ripped during a race and folded double. It began getting painful towards the end but I didn't dare remove them, so gritted my teeth and finished the race. Needless to say that was the last time I used those shorts. ;o)
     
  9. Memphmann

    Memphmann New Member

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    Wow, some of these distances are awesome. Thought I rode alot. Then again, I train more for speed then long distance.

    Those ppl guys who race in the RAAM are something. How about the TdF being like that?

    Memph
     
  10. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    You're being modest. I checked out that website. I see it goes from Trondheim to Oslo across Norway, but high point is 1909 m (actually, I guess you made a typo). Total up climbing is 4304 m and refreshments are posted every 50 km. It looks like an incredible ride, something to gun for if I can get at least one double century in before I think about trying it. That's a lot of climbing for one ride, not to speak of the distance.

    It looks like you're taking the honors now for longest ride: 540 km. Wow!
     
  11. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    So far, I haven't heard from any recumbent cyclists for longest ride. I have never ridden a recumbent, but I hear that 20 mph is easy to maintain due to the decreased wind resistance. It seems like you could rack up an enormous amount of miles in 24 hours on one of these. Has anyone done their longest ride on a recumbent?
     
  12. monagg

    monagg New Member

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    Carried a VistaLite 5 W and 15 W light with 4 batteries. Also had a 7 LED divers light as backup. The VistLites worked great - only needed to use the 5 W light to see where I was going.
     
  13. Alnamvet

    Alnamvet New Member

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    Huancayo to Cuzco, Peru, South America...about 500 km.
     
  14. nomad

    nomad New Member

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    Recumbents have actually been banned from both Vatternrundan and Den Store Styrkeproven as they outperformed all the big guns on their standard frames.

    There was a Dutchman on a recumbent who arrived at the finish of Den Store Styrkeproven 1,5 hours before the quickest peloton in 1997 or 1998. They then banned recumbents for the following years. As far as I could see on the web he still hasn't received his first prize for winning the competition. :(
     
  15. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    Was that for the full 540 km race? I see they list 3 races total; 2 are shorter.

    Also, I am wondering if a peloton of recumbents would give riders much of an advantage. If you don't break much wind, you don't leave much of a wake either. It would be quite a different game.

    It's interesting that they did not create a separate category for recumbents. I guess they don't want to take the thunder away from the uprights, especially if many companies sponsoring the race only build uprights, not recumbents.
     
  16. nomad

    nomad New Member

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    That was indeed in the full length race. If I remember it correctly they were three recumbents who rode together from the start. One had to stop with knee problems or similar. The other two stuck together for most of the race but towards the end one of them was stronger and finished half an hour ahead of the other.

    I agree, it is a bit peculiar but can probably be put into one word: Conservative! I always fancied the word "progressive" myself... Even if I ride an old Peugeot racer from the 80's. :)
     
  17. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    Nomad: You've got me dreaming about the Lightning F-40 with full wrap and windshield. If it had fluorescent colors it would be great for visibility. I saw one guy on the web do a 1:44 for a 50 mi time trial in one. I think he was 60 years old.

    More to the topic of this thread, another guy, aged 53 yrs, did 601.3 miles in 24 hours in a hpv, another Lightning brand bike. He said he would never do it again. That's what they say about the 1 hour too.

    Also, I noticed a web site for you riders with that faraway look in your eyes. Check this out: http://www.rusa.org/cgi-bin/eventsearch_PF.pl

    This is for "randonneurs", bikers who do long distances with no outside help. In other words, you don't get a support van. I guess you pack your own food. I see over 30,000 miles worth of races listed for 2004, starting in Anchorage, Alaska in April. Maybe I'll get that double century. It's worth a look. Notice most of the rides are in increments of a hundred miles; they don't bother with the second digit much.
     
  18. Tourer

    Tourer New Member

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    Mine was 96 miles.
    Rode from Chicago to Upper Michigan, I'm old(48), over weight and a recovering cig smoker.
    Only planned on doing 60 mi. a day, but on the last day I was real close and decided to go for it.
    Made it in at 10:00 PM, riding on a not too busy highway.
    Had to keep turning my light off and on, cause the batteries were getting low and would only turn them on when a car was coming.
    So, the next year, when I rode to St. Louis, I bought a good rechargable light system. Of course it rained almost all the way there, so this year I bought a full body rain suit, with hood.
     
  19. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    The proverbial last trip. You're like me, a strong finisher.
     
  20. Tourer

    Tourer New Member

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    Yeah, think so.
    Takes awhile to get in the groove.
    Every moring I would start out and think, What the hell am I doing !!
    Then at night I would wonder why I stopped, I should have kept going.
     
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