Your Longest Ride

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by gntlmn, Oct 22, 2003.

  1. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    Yeah. It seemed like I would rarely get rolling before noon, and it wasn't the sun going down that would get me to stop. It was hunger. That's one thing about long rides: you sure have to put down a lot of chow.
     


  2. Tourer

    Tourer New Member

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    I'm lucky, my tennant works for the National Guard, and gives me lots of MRE's. They're great, get a meal,desert,piece of candy,toilet paper and coffee or tea.
    They are kinda heavy, but pretty tasty and are pretty balanced nutrition, and the more I eat, the lighter my load gets(theoretically)
    I try not to eat out too much, when touring, You never know what they are gonna give you in some of those small town restaurants.
     
  3. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    I had one lady in a greasy spoon diner laughing at me when I asked her if the 3 pancake order was very big. I was concerned about getting enough to eat and didn't want to wait for a second round to cook. She told me there would be no way I would be able to eat all 3. I heard her laughing at me to a fellow worker behind the grill. When they brought out the pancakes, I was surprised. They really were big, each covering the entire plate and extending beyond about 2 inches all the way around. It was an impressive stack, thick too. I ate the whole thing and pretended like it was easy, but I didn't order any more. It looked like she was a little upset. I think she must have weighed about 400 lbs. I may have been the first to eat that whole stack.

    The places I likee the best were the all you can eat places because you didn't have to wait with a roaring appetite.

    These multiple century rides I will be trying to do this spring will require me to carry my own food. I think I'll eat a lot of dried salmon and maybe some well oiled (for calories) corn bread. That ought to keep me going.
     
  4. mataliog

    mataliog New Member

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    my longest ride Athens-Sparti 257kms.Every year first Saturday of October the famous Spartaciada is the simulation of one Athenian soldier's ancient route from Sparti to Athens who announced the glorious Victory to the King.
    The same route every September doing by running from 200-300 athletes from all over the world.
    this year it was my 3 rd in a row finish.
     
  5. ccdriver

    ccdriver New Member

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    I used to do the Davis Double every year 200 miles fun ride , but after several years got bored with it. Now mostly 65 to 75 milers and centurys.
     
  6. yayaya

    yayaya New Member

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    Not as long as yours but 115miles/4 hours 28 minutes with a couple of buddys.
     
  7. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    Wow! You must be pro with a time like that. Better than 25 mph, like Tour de France riders.:D
     
  8. yayaya

    yayaya New Member

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    No not quite pros, One of the three was on U.S. National team, me and the other guy just decent Catogery 2 riders, and I was hurting badly after that effort.
     
  9. dasaint

    dasaint New Member

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    just a 135 kilometers with a 3,000 meter ascent
     
  10. Memphmann

    Memphmann New Member

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    Just gotta love those climbs. This one training route I use to take back home (British Columbia, Canada) was awesome. 142km and would take me around 6hrs. Had two huge climbs, 1st was 13kms @ 7-9%, 2nd was 14km @ 5-7%. All of this while spinning a 39x21....

    Memph
     
  11. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    What I like about climbs is that I really know how much effort I've put out to do it. On the flats, it can vary greatly depending on how hard I worked it. This is because of the exponential relationship between speed and wind resistance. This is not the case in the steep mountains. You might use a little bit more overall energy in a steep climb with a faster speed, but generally, the speed is slow enough that the wind is not a great factor. In other words, if you climb it, there is no getting around that accomplishment.

    It's a lot easier to go a long, long distance without mountains. I think that weighs very heavily on how far you can go in one ride.
     
  12. Memphmann

    Memphmann New Member

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    Just like the way the distance can be shorter, with a longer riding time and more effort used. Plus nothing like the ache in your legs after 5 minutes of climbing and know you still have 30 more minutes. Also now realize that this has become easier for weak riders because of the triple chainring. Only a baby needs this ring....

    Memph
     
  13. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    That reminds me of a race I did in '91: 10 km, 800+ meter climb, unpaved rugged road with a lot of sharp bumps and loose broken gravel. If you didn't lean forward just right, your back wheel would spin.

    I was only on my first rise at the bottom when I realized that my gears were not functioning properly. I felt like I was a notch or two too high on the gears, but there was nothing I could do except quit the race, and that was not an option to me. I wasn't going to bail out of the only formal race I'd ever entered. So I dug in deep and road on.

    The surprising thing is that I didn't collapse. I surprised myself that I really had a lot more reserve than I thought I did. If I could have dropped to a lower gear, I'm sure I would have just started dogging it. Instead I realized that I just don't push myself nearly as much as I probably should to ge a great rider. I guess I'm not as naturally competitive as the better cyclists.

    I did that climb again this summer. If I could do that 10 times straight in one day up and back, I would say that although that wouldn't be my longest ride, that would most certainly be my greatest endurance ride. If I said that I'll do that next summer, I'd probably think of an excuse not to. So I'm not going to say it; I'll see what I end up doing.
     
  14. Memphmann

    Memphmann New Member

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    You see, it is amazing what we are able to do when needed. I just hate the thought of spinning in a baby ring training when I know I shall never use it to race with. Guess it is the Jan vs Lance way of climbing. I enjoy spinning all day long on flats. But when the climbs hit, prefer to push a bigger gear......

    Memph
     
  15. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    The more horsepower you generate, however, the more likely that the big gear approach is going to result in eventual knee problems. I think that's the main reason why Lance prefers the high cadence style. I watch the tour pretty closely on OLN every year, and at one point, I heard them talking about how much wattage he gives up by spinning more, but they say it is easier on the muscles and joints. I think it takes maybe 5% more aerobic energy to maintain the speed he does, but the bottleneck is apparently the legs for him. They tested this with a heartrate monitor with different gearing and cadences. He has such incredible O2 uptake that he can afford to give up some short term gain to keep himself in the game for the long haul. On the other hand, Jan has missed an entire tour recovering from knee surgery, but he continues to push a high gear. Now, Lance is lining up for win number 6 without a problem. Consider also another notable (better word, "phenomenal") rider Miguel Indurain. He won 5 in a row with the high cadence approach that Lance uses. Miguel gave Lance some tips before his first tour. I suspect this was one of them. People look past Miguel, the more current fast cadence champion, to the other 5 time great who shared a similar style: Jacques Anquetil. They say he got it from him, but I'm not so sure. Also, Lance modified his pedaling style more recently to include more calf. This also takes more load off the big thigh muscles which you want to keep smaller in order to keep your weight down for the hills.

    So the higher cadence puts more stress on the aerobic system and the calfing puts more on the calves, each taking some stress off the thighs and knees. That's the other big reason. If you push a smaller gear, you can afford to have smaller leg muscles and thus less weight to push up the hills.

    I'm for smaller gears and faster cadences. But I don't think I need to worry about it as much as someone like Lance or probably you for that matter. The more power you generate, the more stress on the legs and the greater the risk for injury.

    This may not sound like it has much to do with this thread, but it does because these repeated stresses add up on a very long ride. This may keep you from quitting early with sore knees.
     
  16. Memphmann

    Memphmann New Member

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    It is like I'm repling to a teacher of sorts. You are correct in this last post. The reason I spin so quickly on flats, 110-120rpm is because of JR racing. We had a gear limit, o in order to go faster, we have to learn to spin faster. This can be noticed when I ride with a group. Most are in 52 or 56 and I'm spinning in 39 tooth.

    But the mountains were huge in British Columbia compared to Ontario. So when I raced in BC, I used basically the same gears. Well went from a 42 to a 39. I learn to push bigger gears to climb. Felt better then spinning. This and a bad crash caused my knee problems and finally operations. Would I use a triple now, no? Enjoy the way I ride....

    Memph
     
  17. 62vette

    62vette Well-Known Member

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    My longest ride is coming up in 10 days, 160km - the Lake Taupo Cycle Challenge in New Zealand. See http://www.cyclechallenge.org.nz. My longest training ride to date has been around 130km.

    I am targeting 5:15 as a finishing time.

    160km is one lap of the lake. There is also the option of doing two or three laps for the seriously deranged.


    Lindsay
     
  18. Memphmann

    Memphmann New Member

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    You want to average nearly 30km/h for the many hours and have not even trained at that distance. All I have to say to you is good luck and stay in a group and suck huge wheel.....

    Some ppl....

    Memph
     
  19. 62vette

    62vette Well-Known Member

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    My plan is definitely to hook into the right bunch and make it as easy as possible.

    I am not quite as unprepared as you'd think. I have trained up to and beyond my target time, but not in a bunch all the time hence the distances of my longest (and solo) rides have not covered the same distance as the event.

    I have a training plan from Mike Styliano of Performance Lab (Jon Ackland http://www.cyclingnz.com/science.phtml?n=30) who have previously seen me through a half marathon without leaving too much blood on the pavement (although quite a bit of sweat.)

    I rode a 100km event two weeks ago in 2:47 (in a good bunch,) so I'm quite happy with my preparation to date.

    Cheers,
    Lindsay
     
  20. gntlmn

    gntlmn New Member

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    Sounds like you are being realistic. I'm sure you realize that food and water intake along the way is going to be a stumbling block unless you satisfy your needs. I can stuff myself and guzzle a whole bunch of water for a 100 km ride and won't need any on the way, but the 160 km would be a different matter.
     
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