Your worse enemy has arrived...

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by Mycophiles, Sep 1, 2003.

  1. Mycophiles

    Mycophiles New Member

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    I'm a smoker. Thrue and thrue.. I smoke about 3-4 packs a week. I've been smoking for about 5 years now. I was born with a aortic deficiency requireing openheart surgery when I was 14 and because nicoteen is a vasoconstrictor i've set my sights on quitting. I started smoking in college and now need to quit for many reasons other than this. 1. It's dirty. 2. It's expensive etc... etc. (not to mention deadly)

    Health wise I'm 100%. My birth defect of my aorta I have no lingering issues as it's been cleared up by surgery.

    At 18 I began riding Mt. Bikes and got into it fairly heavily with a trek 9800 and commenced to tear up the trails for a couple years. In college I quit/ cracked my bike in a fall and havent rode since.

    Back to the present situation. I'm in terrible health. I'm about 180lb at 5ft 8in with a large body structure. I eat healthy and don't drink but this isn't really helpfull if I smoke right?

    I've bought a bike and plan on getting rid of my deadly habbit of smoking. I know every single one of you is probobly frowning while reading this. I don't blame you. No one in their right mind lets themselves start such a habbit but I don't want to argue the point for obvious reasons.

    I know nutrition well enouph to know what to do on that side but untill I get my heartrate up and constant that really doesnt do anything for me. Now, I want to make a plan. Road rides 4 times a week (I work full time and go to school) is what I'm willing to commit too. I'd like some advice on how long my rides should be. I've thought maybe a two hour ride and hang it up but I'm not sure. Maybe I should get a heartrate monitor and just start timing my ride after my heartrate levels off and quit an hour after.

    Do that for a couple weeks then (if I've quit smoking by then) plan out some more strenous rides.

    I'm looking for some moral support as well as advice so any suggestions would help. :)
     
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  2. jtfleming

    jtfleming New Member

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    Good luck with quitting smoking...certainly will help you.

    It would seem to me that your next goal along side smoking is really weight loss combined with a fitness regimen. You are going to burn the most fat in the aerobic training zone, which is really pretty light to moderate intensity. The longer you ride, the more calories you burn, the more fit those legs become.

    A heart rate monitor is a good motivation tool if you can afford one. They range from about $79-300 or so. You want your heart rate to be roughly 60-80 percent of (your age subtracted from 220, which is considered the maximum human heart rate) to stay aerobic. In my case, at age 42, my max heart rate is right in the 180 range (220-42=178) and I operate aerobically around 140-160 beats/minute. Stay on the low side until you get the weight down, and

    GOOD LUCK!
     
  3. Mycophiles

    Mycophiles New Member

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    Thanks for the help.

    I guess some long rides are going to be in order.

    My poor butt. :(
     
  4. M2cycler

    M2cycler New Member

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    i don't think it bothers anyone that ur a smoker.

    with the training, just keep it consistent for a few weeks, do ur 2 hour 4 times a week thing. maybe u could make it 2 hr or 50km, whatever comes after. do that for a couple of weeks and u should be feeling pretty good.

    after that just increase it with whatever ur comfortable with.

    maybe u could ride to school

    good luck
     
  5. Blackie

    Blackie New Member

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    Good luck mate with your battle. Given that you are on 3-4 packs and reckon you need to lose a fair amount of weight, be prepared for a long battle, not an easy victory.

    I can tell you that your strategy of replacing the fags with exercise is an excellent one. I quit about 8 years ago by combining quitting with training for a marathon. The exercise gave me the highs that the fags no longer could, and it reminded me of how much damage the fags had done to my lungs.

    As I'm not an expert on quitting ciggies, I don't know what to recommend, but I'd say make a plan to reduce your intake over time - write in down in a calendar. At the same time make a realistic plan to gradually increase your exercise. Don't overdo it - you do not want to set yourself back; often I've seen 10% incremental jumps per week recommended, max.

    Remember that smoking suppresses appetite, so you may feel the need to do that. It can help to weigh yourself regularly to keep an eye on your weight. I would say if you can hold your weight constant til you quit properly, you are doing well. Then aim to lose around 1lb a week gradually by a combination of slightly more exercise/less food. Enjoy your cycling - try and join a club so you have company and they can give you advice.

    Good luck - your body will thank you for it!
     
  6. crustedfish

    crustedfish New Member

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    How far is your home from school/work?

    Remember, a great way to get some riding time in is to commute by bike to work/school.

    I'm a professional cook in Chicago, so, it didn't bother me that my 7mile commute to the Loop left me sweaty at work. I'm back in school, too, and I take my time going the 6 miles to school, so I don't get too funky.

    I used to work from 11AM to well past midnight, and even though I was dead tired, I looked forward to my riding home.

    There's a ton of ideas on making bicycle commuting easy...just google it..let me know if you need anything else..

    randy
     
  7. Aztec

    Aztec New Member

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    Congrats on the decision. Worry about precise work later. For now, your 4 rides/week, for a few hours each sounds like a great plan.
     
  8. meth24

    meth24 New Member

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    I used to smoke over 10 packs/week and quit in Dec. 2002. A few months later is when I started deciding to exercise as I was 6'3" and 175lbs. when I quit, but quickly went up to about 200+ lbs. I had never weighed over 180 or so until that point. I'm at around 190 lbs now, but my heart rate has gone back down (was at around 80-85bpm when smoking, now back to around 50-55bpm when relaxed). In much better shape now at 190 than back then at 175.

    Easiest way to stay off cigarettes is the mentality, realizing the money you saved, not waking up coughing, finding yourself being able to go farther and faster on the bike. You can taste food a little better, only downside is your sense of smell comes back and you can smell cigarettes and other nasty things, haha. Good luck with quitting and be strong.
     
  9. Mycophiles

    Mycophiles New Member

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    Thanks for all the replies.

    I work about 10 miles away but the ride is into the heart of Houston on some fairly busy roads. Looking at a map or just picturing in my mind what roads I could ride on leaves me with a blank stare. There's really no roads at all that would be safe to ride on between here and work.

    I don't mind that as I work with people and would not like smelling funky at work. I'm thinking I will find a place around my house to ride at. Presently I'm waiting on my bike. I've bought the Specialized Allez Alite but am returning it with a 500$ check to get a Specialized Allex Comp Cr-Mo. I found while riding the relatively smooth roads of my neighberhood that the aluminum is going to beat me to death if I ride everyday.

    I am overweight. My body fat % is around 39% from what I can determine with online calculators and such. That's waaay too high for my taste and I have quit smoking in the past and always I put on 10 lbs and level out. Like I said earlier I do eat healthy and don't overeat. I have just leveled out as far as weight goes. I don't stray above 185 nor go below 180 no matter what I do. I can starve myself and I dont seem to loose any weight. I havent seen myself out of the 180's since I was 22 yrs. old.

    There are so many types of diet's out there for different exercise schedules/lifestyles and whatnot. I'm not a lover of eating so It's easy for me to change my dietary habbits. I've determined that If I eat a couple eggs for breakfast... a lunch that consists of a salad and a piece of chicken and a dinner that has no fatty fats or is boiled in lard that I won't put on a lot of weight when I finally do quit. I'm not sure if there is a special diet you riders go on for your rides but I'm wondering if all I need to do for riding is make sure I have a couple health bars with me for riding and leave it at that. Maybe eat a bunch of fruit before each ride and then eat normally otherwise. I dunno. Maybe not much change in my diet is needed. Maybe a little more protein but that's all.
     
  10. serottarider

    serottarider New Member

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    If your bodyfat percentage is really 39% you're either clinically obese or very close to being so. You say that you weigh around 185 lbs and so with 39% fat you'd have a lean body mass of just under 113 lbs.

    Assuming that you want a bodyfat percentage in the "healthy-normal" range your total weight would need to be around 125 - 135 lbs, which means that you're looking to lose around 50 lbs. That's a lot of weight to shift and you should plan on it taking you several months. In fact the exercise will grow that lean body mass while losing inches (since muscle is more dense and therefore less "bulky" than fat).

    These numbers seem a bit odd, and I'd suggest that you might want to get them checked either by your Doctor or by a local health club before setting any target weights. Once you're over about 25% bodyfat the charts can become increasingly unreliable. If your body fat really is 39% your Doc should also be able to give you some strategies for success based on your individual physiology and lifestyle.

    Riding will certainly help you to gain fitness, but you'll need to watch your food intake too. Calories in need to be less than calories burned in order to lose weight. The riding will help to increase the calories burned. And watch your fat intake carefully. At 9 calories per gram "hidden" fat is a dietary minefield.

    Good luck and congratulations on making a start towards good health and fitness.
     
  11. THE RECTOR

    THE RECTOR New Member

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    Mycophiles............up until 2 years ago I smoked and drank more than you do....it just takes a lot of willpower.
    You will find that when you get off the bike you wont want a cigarette.
    The adrenaline seems to replace the craving for nicotine.

    I was 45 pounds overweight...and the same height as you.

    Just get on the bike as often as possible.....and dont eat too much extra food....the fat will just disappear with time.
    Above all, just get out and enjoy the bike!
     
  12. Memphmann

    Memphmann New Member

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    Congrats on your decision. Hope everything goes well for you. This can either be extremely hard or easy for you. The benefits shall be rewarding once you reach a level of renewed fitness.

    I to have just got back into cycling after a # of years off the bike and knee operations. Have lost 22 lbs in 6-7 weeks and feel stronger. Diet is an important aspect. There are so many types. This is what I did, and may help you. Before my morning ride, I pop two "Dyma-Burn Xtreme". They help speed up my metabolism. I ride 4-5 hrs with intervals twice a week. When I get home I eat fruit and drink fruit juice. Eat one meal a day (dinner, and only have half of what I use to serve myself) and drink litres of water and juice. We all have cravings, so use this to reward yourself. Like if you ride a distance in a fast time, reward with choc bar, pop or what-ever. I allow myself to eat potato chips and pop on Friday nights.

    Hearrate is a great way to judge your training and set more acurate goals. Remember 220-age is a rough gauge. My max should be 190, but is actually 227. But this shall give you a rough idea at what to ride at.

    Well good luck.......

    Memph
     
  13. less'go

    less'go New Member

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    Hey there,

    Wow, heartfelt post there, buddy.There are still some smokers (or recent ones) out there. I quit just a couple of months ago and have thrown all my energy into biking (and the rest of my life). It was hard at first, but I knew it was something I had to do because, well, you just aren't going to keep on smoking are you? You know you have to quit one of these days, face the music and dance? It just isn't worth it. I used the patch, marvelous invention, and went to see a tabacologist (Dr. specialized in quitting smoking, y'know?) to help me quit. It's a good time to rethink everything about your health, although I don't think you waznt to try to quit smoking and put a lot of importance on losing weight at the same time.

    I haven't biked since I was a kid, but went out and bought a simple road bike equipped with baby seat, and my new philosophy is I don't walk, I ride, and I always go out of my way... then I ride everyday, and keep my goals modest. Today, after just 2 weeks in the saddle, I biked about 12 kilometers, including some good size inclines, and I was so proud of myself.

    Don't decide you have to go really far or have some strict schedule to fill right away. Nothing better to disgust you right off the bat. Just do little stuff at first, like 2 kilometers the first day, 3 the next, 1 the next, 5 the next... and each time you add a little more, a hill, or an extra block, or whatever. Ride everyday, but some days not as much.

    You can do it, you can stop smoking and get into shape, attack the smoking and drive it away with your bike. Wanna' smoke? Go ride around the block (or the yard, or the farm, or wherever you live), a little 5 minute ride to replace the craving.

    Let me know how it goes! If you've forgotten your big plans, no time like the present to get back on them!

    Sara


    :cool:
     
  14. jkca1

    jkca1 New Member

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    Man,

    It's notes like this that drive me crazy. The day my father got out of the hospital after his heart attack he gave up smoking cold turkey. He had smoked for about 50 years, Camels and Lucky Strikes, but he quit and never went back. So if you want to quit and improve the quality of your life you know it can be done.

    Now for the moral support; I will be glad to do whatever I can to help you improve your health. If you want to exchange stories about training, eating, life etc etc I am more then willing to do my part to help you turn your life around. I have had plenty of people help me in my life and turnabout is fair play. Just let me know and good luck.

    -Jim-

    Certified Personal Trainier and father of 1 soon to be 2



     
  15. FatRoadie

    FatRoadie New Member

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    Mycophiles,

    Some would say Im in the same boat as you...Im not a smoker or drinker, however over the last couple of years while working in a supervisory capacity in the oilfield diving industry, my weight topped out at almost 320lbs....remembering back to being stationed in Germany, and riding both road and mtb while over there I decided there and then that I will not live my life grossly overweight like that... Returned to the MTB first....started dropping the weight, and then returned to the Road bike...

    Staying the course will be the hardest thing you ever do....because of the one simple fact that quitting is the easiest thing you can do...Adding 10 more miles to the ride, while being pounded by the rain is much harder than just rollin back to the truck and headin to the pub...

    My biggest problem is that even though my speed and distance are coming up to speed with the locals here.....I dont quite fit into their groups or pacelines cause I cant hold the perfect line, or dont know all the roadie stuff... My other riding partner (bike shop owner) can usually only get one ride in with me per week...Other than that Im on my own...

    I cant give you advice as Im no expert......thats why Im here...to learn something...And there is a wealth of info here....from top notch folks like ricstern and 2lap.....and others.......

    As for moral support.......hell Im right here with ya man.......6'2" 240......neck 19.5" chest 56" waist 38".......down from 320 and a 50" gut..........
    Peddlin like there is no tomorrow......cause with ateriosclerosis, diabetes, heart disease and everything else there is to get from being morbidly out of shape........There wont be a tomorrow....

    Bruce
     
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