Yuca vs. Yucca

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Steve Pope, Feb 9, 2006.

  1. Steve Pope

    Steve Pope Guest

    I ate at a restaurant recently whose on-line menu stated
    they had deep-fried "yuca". I take this to be the Spanish
    word for manioc root.

    On arriving at the restaurant, the menu referred to deep-fried
    "yucca", the familiar cactus-like plant from the southwest
    and Mexico. Helen Russell in _Foraging for Dinner_ writes
    about eating the flowers of the yucca plant, but not the
    roots.

    In any case, what I was served was deep-fried roots of some
    sort, I am guessing manioc but maybe yucca roots -- are they
    edible?

    These aren't be any chance the same plant as each other?
    I'm pretty sure not.

    Steve
     
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  2. dee

    dee Guest

    Steve Pope wrote:
    > I ate at a restaurant recently whose on-line menu stated
    > they had deep-fried "yuca". I take this to be the Spanish
    > word for manioc root.
    >
    > On arriving at the restaurant, the menu referred to deep-fried
    > "yucca", the familiar cactus-like plant from the southwest
    > and Mexico. Helen Russell in _Foraging for Dinner_ writes
    > about eating the flowers of the yucca plant, but not the
    > roots.
    >
    > In any case, what I was served was deep-fried roots of some
    > sort, I am guessing manioc but maybe yucca roots -- are they
    > edible?
    >
    > These aren't be any chance the same plant as each other?
    > I'm pretty sure not.
    >
    > Steve


    Did you enjoy it? What did it taste like?
     
  3. Steve Pope

    Steve Pope Guest

    dee <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Did you enjoy it? What did it taste like?


    Yes, it was very good. A mild-flavored, reasonably tender,
    slightly vegetal and nutty tasting root. They did a
    good job of deep-frying it too.

    I haven't had manioc enough times to say for sure that
    it is the same item.

    Steve
     
  4. Steve wrote:

    > I ate at a restaurant recently whose on-line menu stated
    > they had deep-fried "yuca". I take this to be the Spanish
    > word for manioc root.
    >
    > On arriving at the restaurant, the menu referred to deep-fried
    > "yucca", the familiar cactus-like plant from the southwest
    > and Mexico. Helen Russell in _Foraging for Dinner_ writes
    > about eating the flowers of the yucca plant, but not the
    > roots.
    >
    > In any case, what I was served was deep-fried roots of some
    > sort, I am guessing manioc but maybe yucca roots -- are they
    > edible?
    >
    > These aren't be any chance the same plant as each other?
    > I'm pretty sure not.



    Well...it COULD be the same plant, but probably not. There are lots of
    plants called "yucca," and some of them have edible roots. See
    http://www.anapsid.org/resources/yucca.html for more information.

    By the way, the article uses the term "prussic acid." In case you weren't
    aware, that's a solution of hydrogen cyanide and water.

    Bob
     
  5. aem

    aem Guest

    Steve Pope wrote:
    > I ate at a restaurant recently whose on-line menu stated
    > they had deep-fried "yuca". I take this to be the Spanish
    > word for manioc root.
    >
    > On arriving at the restaurant, the menu referred to deep-fried
    > "yucca", the familiar cactus-like plant from the southwest
    > and Mexico. Helen Russell in _Foraging for Dinner_ writes
    > about eating the flowers of the yucca plant, but not the
    > roots.
    >
    > In any case, what I was served was deep-fried roots of some
    > sort, I am guessing manioc but maybe yucca roots -- are they
    > edible?
    >
    > These aren't be any chance the same plant as each other?
    > I'm pretty sure not.
    >

    They are not the same plant, and what you had was yuca, which as you
    say is manioc root. In Costa Rica you see it pretty often, think of it
    as basically a french fries substitute. -aem
     
  6. "aem" Wrote
    >>

    > They are not the same plant, and what you had was yuca, which as you
    > say is manioc root. In Costa Rica you see it pretty often, think of it
    > as basically a french fries substitute. -aem




    Thats right,
    I ate it often in Barzil, years ago, where it's called "manteca de terra"
    or - butter of the earth. Just boiled or steamed it IS incredibly buttery,
    delicious an low fat!.

    Richard.
     
  7. Steve Pope

    Steve Pope Guest

    aem <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Steve Pope wrote:


    >> In any case, what I was served was deep-fried roots of some
    >> sort, I am guessing manioc but maybe yucca roots -- are they
    >> edible?


    >They are not the same plant, and what you had was yuca, which as you
    >say is manioc root. In Costa Rica you see it pretty often, think of it
    >as basically a french fries substitute. -aem


    Thanks. This was a Peruvian restaurant, so it's got to be
    yuca. Someone probably "corrected" the spelling on the menu.

    Steve
     
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