Yup ... ANOTHER noob question!

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by 66aldo, Mar 16, 2007.

  1. 66aldo

    66aldo New Member

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    Hi. Sorry is this is another one of "those" posts. :confused: I've spent some time searching through the forums for some answers and info but still don't really have the answer.

    I have an old 10 speed road racer (late 70s) which was my dad's then became my ride when I was younger (I'm 41 now and haven't ridden a bike since my mid-twenties).
    .
    I'm not sure whether or not to get a new(er) bike or mod this one. The streets are brutal for my aluminum skinnies and forget about any offroad excursions on this thing! It will be used mainly on the street and occasionally on a trail.

    I'm looking to get back into shape and do some casual riding, nothing too serious or competitive. My budget is pretty tight too (maybe trade-in and/or sell and another $200-$300 on top).

    Any help would be appreciated! :)
    Aldo
     
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  2. SEAcarlessTTLE

    SEAcarlessTTLE New Member

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    Is it in good enough shape to ride safely without replacing/fixing a lot of stuff? If, for instance, all it needs are some fresh tires* and a little tune-up, then it might be worth it to ride it around for a while. My guess is that with some riding time, you'll learn a lot about what you like/dislike about your bike, as well as what kinds of riding you're interested in. All of that info could help you make a smarter purchase if you decide to get a new bike, since there are so many options out there. Meanwhile, you're saving money...

    *I mention tires 'cause if your wheels are a standard size (e.g., 700c), your investment in tires would not be wasted if you got a new bike...unless you got a mountain bike or something (since they usually have smaller wheels).

    Welcome back to cycling...you'll love it!
     
  3. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    I have recently done up a few old 10 speed bikes just to keep busy.

    I found, if the frame is not rusty, the next limiting features are the rims and gears.

    If the rims are steel and 27x1 1/4, buy some 700c alloy wheels.

    If the rims are alloy ok. If the gears are 5 speed 14-28, then you will find the gaps a bit big and the geraring a bit low. I use Sunrace 6 speed index thumb shifters on all my upgrades.

    See below for examples:
     
  4. 66aldo

    66aldo New Member

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    Thanks for the replies!
    The bike is perfectly rideable (pedals and shifts and steers fine). My dad had the tires replaced and the bike was put into storage so they are brand new. There is no rust on it whatsoever. It does have the drop racing bars on it as well as aluminum wheels.
    I was thinking maybe going to a more upright handlebar and a more beefier tire. :confused:
     
  5. SEAcarlessTTLE

    SEAcarlessTTLE New Member

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    You might be able to raise the handlebars a bit. Your bike almost surely has a standard threaded headset, so you could follow these instructions, if you're feeling inclined, or ask a bike-savvy friend or shop mechanic:

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/handsup.html#threaded

    If the stem (part that holds the bars and goes into the frame's head tube) is too short, you might be able to find a replacement in a local shop's used parts bin. Replacing a stem isn't tricky but can be timeconsuming, depending on your current stem's design.

    As for tires, were you thinking fatter tires for a smoother ride? Assuming your wheels are a standard size (like 700c...Does it say that anywhere on those new tires?), you can probably find fatter tires that will work with them. As the chart at the bottom of this page shows, how wide a tire you can safely use with your wheel depends on the rim's inside width:

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire_sizing.html
     
  6. 66aldo

    66aldo New Member

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    Holy cow! :eek:
    I made the mistake this morning of going to an actual bike shop to check things out and ask questions! Talk about sticker shock after that trip! :rolleyes:

    Anyhow, here is a pic of my old/current 10 speed:

    [​IMG]

    I've also included these 2 shots, one of the tire that's on there and a closeup of the rim. What I figured were 700c is actually a 27 inch tire.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I'm sure there IS a difference between the 27 and 700c. Anyhow, the bike shop steered me away from a pure mountain bike and figured that maybe a "city" bike or "comfort" bike (which I think is a hybrid? :confused: ) would better suit my needs.

    I might stick to my trusty 10 speed and maybe just get a more comfortable and newer seat for my overweight butt and just ride. I can't justify spend $300 + for a second bike.
     
  7. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    Have a close look at the pix of the grey bike I posted.

    Wheels are like yours, alloy 27x1 1/4.
    I fitted new 27x1 1/4 tyres, took off the drop bars and added flat bars with Thumb index shifters and a suspension seat post and a new saddle. It all cost less than $100. ;)
     
  8. 66aldo

    66aldo New Member

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    Thanks George!
    I did see that and it looked pretty close to what I had.
    I'm not all that tech savvy but I might check into doing something similar to mine. Are your wheels aluminum?
     
  9. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    Yes, the original ones were steel and badly dented so I got a pair of aluminium alloy on special, the new rear has a spin on freewheel, I may upgrade to 7 or 8 speed later. ;)
     
  10. SEAcarlessTTLE

    SEAcarlessTTLE New Member

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    Beautiful bike! That lugwork is gorgeous...

    Yeah, I wouldn't rush to spend money...give this bike a shot. If a comfier saddle and maybe thicker bar tape (plus maybe raising the bars or getting a new stem, also cheap) doesn't make the ride comfortable enough, you can probably find still find 27x1 3/8 tires out there, too, which will definitely help.
     
  11. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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  12. 66aldo

    66aldo New Member

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    Beautiful bike! That lugwork is gorgeous... I don't get it? :confused:
     
  13. 66aldo

    66aldo New Member

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    Beautiful bike! That lugwork is gorgeous... I don't get it? :confused:

    Damnit! I hate this editing! :eek:
     
  14. SEAcarlessTTLE

    SEAcarlessTTLE New Member

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    Oh, older bikes like yours often have beautifully shaped lugs, which are the bits that join the frame tubes together. The welds on modern metal bikes look plain at best.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lugged_steel_frame_construction
     
  15. 66aldo

    66aldo New Member

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    Very interesting! It's funny the things you take for granted and never notice. :)
     
  16. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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  17. RedHotIron

    RedHotIron New Member

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    Lugged bikes are a tad heavier but i got my unknown vintage Puch about '94 & its still going strong, with upgrades. Will run it as long as i can get 7 spd cassettes. The fillet brazing on my '90 Peugeot is nice & smooth, nothing like the "ripple" industrial effect that prevails on most newer bikes i see.
     
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