Zzz Soy....Natural Danger?

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Dave, Oct 26, 2003.

  1. Dave

    Dave Guest

    Soy Toxins
    There's plenty yet that you didn't know about soy!

    Soy contains several naturally occurring compounds that are toxic to humans
    and animals. The soy industry frequently refers to these toxins as
    anti-nutrients, which implies that they somehow act to prevent the body
    getting the complete nutrition it needs from a food. The soy toxins (such as
    phytic acid) can certainly act in this manner, but they also have the
    ability to target specific organs, cells and enzyme pathways and their
    effects can be devastating.

    The soy toxins that Soy Online Service have concerns about are protease
    inhibitors, phytic acid, soy lectins (or haemagglutins), nitrosamines,
    manganese concentrations and the mysterious soyatoxin. Nitrosamines are not
    naturally occurring in soybeans but form during the processing of products
    such as isolated soy protein (ISP).

    As with any toxin there will be a dose at which negative effects are not
    observed. Soy Online Services have examined the scientific data on the soy
    toxins and have uncovered several alarming truths:

    There is no legislation to protect consumers from soy toxins in raw soy
    products.

    With the possible exception of soy lecithin, all soy products, no matter how
    well treated, contain low to moderate levels of soy toxins; processing
    cannot remove them all of any of them.

    The soy industry has little in the way of quality control to protect
    consumers from exposure to inadequately treated soy products.


    Protease Inhibitors

    Perhaps the best known of the soy toxins are the protease inhibitors (also
    referred to as trypsin inhibitors) which, as the name suggests, are able to
    inhibit the action of proteases (including trypsin) which are enzymes that
    are involved in the process of dismantling proteins for use by the body.

    In the rat, high levels of exposure to protease inhibitors (such as that
    found in raw soy flour) cause pancreatic cancer whereas moderate levels
    cause the rat pancreas to be more susceptible to cancer-causing agents. The
    validity of the rat model to humans has been questioned and the USFDA have
    examined the effects of protease inhibitors on the Cebus monkey (JP Harwood
    et al., Adv Exp Med Biol 1986 199: 223-37).

    The parameters of the Cebus Monkey study were as follows:

    Group Number of monkeys Dietary Protein Trypsin Inhibitor (mg/g of diet)
    1 8 Lactalbumin 0.12
    2 10 Soy Isolate 0.54
    3 6 Casein 0.08
    4 2 Soy Concentrate 2.41

    After five years of chronic ingestion to low levels of trypsin inhibitors,
    there was no discernible pancreatic damage effect in monkeys from groups
    1-3. However, one monkey in group 4 exhibited moderate diffuse acinar
    atrophy, moderate diffuse interstitial fibrosis and moderate chronic
    pancreatitis in all three sections of tissue examined. Minimal lymphoid
    hyperplasia was noted in the other group 4 monkey.

    Therefore, there is good reason to question claims that low levels of soy
    protease inhibitors pose no threat to human health. Such a statement has
    even been made by the USFDA in response to a health claim petition by
    Protein Technologies. The USFDA reported that:

    'Concerns have been raised in the past about exposure to trypsin inhibitors
    contained in soybeans because these compounds had been found to stimulate
    pancreatic hyperplasia and hypertrophy in animals. These concerns have been
    allayed because heat treatment removes most of the activity of these
    proteases. In addition, recent studies have questioned the applicability of
    the animal models, which differ from humans in the type of diet, sensitivity
    of the pancreas to trypsin inhibitors, and the anatomic sites of pancreatic
    cell proliferation and have found low rates of cancer in populations with
    dietary patterns that include soy foods' (FR 63, 217:62977-63015, 1998).

    This statement brought an angry response from Professor Irvin Leiner, the
    foremost expert on protease inhibitors. In his reply to the FDA Liener
    wrote:

    'The impression one gets from reading this section is that that there is
    little cause for concern as far as the human exposure to soybean trypsin
    inhibitors is concerned.... In the interests of a balanced treatment of the
    subject, I trust you will give due consideration to the opposing view that
    the soybean trypsin inhibitors do in fact pose a potential risk to humans
    when soy protein is incorporated into the diet.'

    So, if there is valid concern about low levels of protease inhibitors in soy
    foods, what about exposures to levels higher higher than those in the Cebus
    monkey study? Is there any chance that such exposures could occur in human
    diets?

    Soy Online Service has noted that there is considerable variability in the
    levels of protease inhibitors in commercially available foods and that there
    is little to protect consumers from exposure to high levels of protease
    inhibitors. For example, a study entitled 'Trypsin inhibitor levels in
    soy-based infant formulas and commercial soy protein isolates and
    concentrates (RW Peace et al., 1992, Food Res Int, 25: 137-141) found that
    trypsin inhibitor levels were as high as 2.72 mg/g in ready to feed soy
    formulas and 7.30 mg/g in soy protein concentrate.

    Since there is no established acceptable levels of protease inhibitors in
    foods and no protection from short-term high level (acute) exposures or long
    term low level (chronic) exposures, Soy Online Service offer the following
    advice:

    Don't feed your baby or infant a soy formula; there are alternatives!

    Avoid the direct consumption of raw or partially processed soy products such
    as soy flour or soy protein concentrate. Traditionally fermented soy foods
    are relatively free of protease inhibitors.

    When preparing your own soy foods, such as boiled or roasted soybeans or soy
    milk, ensure that they are adequately heated. The traditional Chinese method
    for preparing soybeans was a time consuming job that was left to monks. It
    involved soaking the beans first and then boiling them twice over 'the full
    length of an incense'.


    Phytates

    The term phytate refers to several compounds that are based on phytic acid
    (inositol hexaphosphate). It is the presence of multiple phosphates in
    phytates that makes them effective chelating agents, i.e. they have the
    ability to bind to certain metal ions. Obviously if metals are bound up in a
    phytate-complex, they are less available to the body ( i.e. less
    bioavailable) for nutritive purposes.

    Phytates are particularly adept at binding metals in their so-called
    divalent state, metal ions such as calcium (Ca2+), copper (Cu2+), iron
    (Fe2+), manganese (Mn2+) and zinc (Zn2+).

    Soybeans contain very high levels of phytate and their are numerous reports
    of reduced bioavailablity of various metals from foods containing soy; this
    has particular significance for vegetarians and infants fed soy-formulas.

    Vegetarians, particularly young women vegetarians, need to be aware that soy
    products affect their iron and zinc requirements and it has been recommended
    that they utilise strategies that minimise the intake of dietary phytate.

    The effects of phytate in soy-formulas are a great concern. The iron and
    zinc requirements of developing infants are well documented, particularly
    those that relate to cognitive function. There is no question that infants
    fed soy-formulas are at greater risk of reduced uptake of various essential
    minerals compared with breast-fed infants or infants fed other formulas.

    Copper bioavailability is significantly lower in rhesus monkeys fed
    low-phytate soy formula from 2 to 4 months.
    Iron absorption in infants is approximately doubled by the removal of
    phytate from soy formula; a similar effect is observed by doubling the
    ascorbic acid content of a soy formula.
    Manganese absorption is also doubled by the removal of phytate from soy
    formula, but increasing the ascorbic acid content of a soy formula
    containing the native amount of phytic acid did not improve manganese
    absorption.
    Zinc bioavailability from soy formulas is also reduced by phytate. In rhesus
    monkeys, zinc absorption was 2.0 times greater from monkey milk compared
    with soy formula, 2.2 times greater from whey-predominant formula compared
    with soy formula and 1.7 times greater from casein-predominant formula
    compared with soy formula. Zinc absorption from dephytinized soy formula was
    approximately the same as that from casein-predominant formula.

    Soy formulas are typically over-supplemented with minerals and vitamins to
    account for the deficiencies caused by phytate, but it is evident that this
    does not take care of the problems. Removal of phytate from soy formulas is
    altogether a better solution but manufactures have not shown any inclination
    do this. Why not? Phytate removal will cost $$$ and it seems to us that soy
    formula manufacturers consider economics to be more important than the well
    being of infants.

    Manganese

    The soybean plant has the ability to absorb manganese from the soil and
    concentrate it to an extent that soy-based infant formulas can contain as
    much as 200 times the level of manganese found in natural breast milk. In
    babies, excess manganese that cannot be metabolised is stored in body
    organs. Around eight percent of the excess manganese in the diet is stored
    in the brain in close proximity to the dopamine-bearing neurons responsible,
    in part, for adolescent neurological development.

    The implications are that the one in eight infants raised on soy formula
    during the first six months of life may be at risk of brain and behavioural
    disorders that do not become evident until adolescence. The following two
    links discuss the issue of manganese toxicity further.

    Is soy-based infant formula brain damaging?

    Press Release written by David Goodman, Ph.D.

    "How safe is soy infant formula?".

    Aluminium

    Aluminum and bone disorders: with specific reference to aluminum
    contamination of infant nutrients.

    Koo WW, Kaplan LA. J Am Coll Nutr. 1988 Jun;7(3):199-214.

    Enteral nutrients including human and whole cow milk have low Al, whereas
    highly processed infant formulas with multiple additives, such as soy
    formula, preterm infant formula, and formulas for specific disorders are
    heavily contaminated with Al.

    However, even with normal renal function, only 30-60% of an Al load from
    parenteral nutrition is excreted in the urine, resulting in tissue
    accumulation of Al.

    To minimize tissue burden, Al content of infant nutrients should be similar
    to "background" levels, i.e., similar to whole milk (less than 50
    micrograms/L).

    Full Abstract Here

    Vitamin B12 Deficiency

    Vitamin B 12 deficiency has been recognised as a serious result of soy
    consumption for many years. For instance JJ Rackis discusses it in January
    1974 in "Biological and Physiological Factors in Soybeans' in the J. Am. Oil
    Chemists Soc, pp 161", and Irvin E Liener examines it in 1994 in
    "Implications of Anti-Nutritional Components in Soybean Foods in Soybean" in
    Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition

    There is a simple explanation of some of the physical effects that can
    result from a deficiency of this important nutrient at. "Vegans Deficient in
    Nutrients".

    If the Moorhead trial judge had known this, would these people now be
    serving a jail term for the death of their child?

    Read about the Seventh Day Adventist Moorheads Here and Here.

    Other Toxins

    Letter to FDA CONSUMER magazine
    http://www.fda.gov/fdac/departs/2000/400_ltrs.html August 2000

    The FDA Consumer article on soy spoke of the possible risks of plant
    estrogens, but made no mention of the carcinogenic effects of protease
    inhibitors found in soy. McGuinness et al. report rats fed raw soya flour
    develop cancer of the pancreas ("The effects of long-term feeding of soya
    flour on the rat pancreas," Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 1980;
    15:497-502). They say that preheating the flour protected the animals, but
    others have said that the high heat required (130 degrees Celsius) to
    deactivate the carcinogenic trypsin inhibitors in soya flour denatures the
    soy proteins to the point that they become virtually useless. If this is so,
    one either chooses less heating, resulting in more surviving trypsin
    inhibitors, or more heating, resulting in useless protein.

    William Jarvis, Ph.D.

    Department of Health Promotion and Education

    Loma Linda University

    Loma Linda, Calif.

    Soyatoxin

    The soy industry funds millions of dollars of research each year; what
    chance is there for the discoverers of soyatoxin to get funding to continue
    their work?
     
    Tags:


  2. David Wright

    David Wright Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Dave <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Soy Toxins
    >There's plenty yet that you didn't know about soy!
    >
    >Soy contains several naturally occurring compounds that are toxic to humans
    >and animals. The soy industry frequently refers to these toxins as
    >anti-nutrients, which implies that they somehow act to prevent the body
    >getting the complete nutrition it needs from a food. The soy toxins (such as
    >phytic acid) can certainly act in this manner, but they also have the
    >ability to target specific organs, cells and enzyme pathways and their
    >effects can be devastating.
    >
    >The soy toxins that Soy Online Service have concerns about are protease


    I just looked at the web site for "Soy Online Services." Wow, what a
    collection of diatribes and fearmongering. They take a lot of highly
    ambiguous data and then announce "soy is bad."

    It's a big web site. I'd say a lot of work has gone into it. Who
    finances it? That's what I'd like to know. My cursory trip through
    PubMed didn't yield any "soy is the devil's work" papers, but perhaps
    I just didn't look hard enough.

    -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
    These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
    "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants
    were standing on my shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
     
  3. In <[email protected]>, Dave wrote:

    > Soy Toxins
    > There's plenty yet that you didn't know about soy!


    Dave, aren't you the one who tells us that foods can't be
    toxic? Soy has been used as a food in Asia for thousands
    of years. It's so important that there are actually
    holidays celebrating the discovery of soy products.

    Now, if you want to tell us that foods that have been used
    in China and Korea for thousands of years can be dangerous,
    you do run the risk that we might suspect the same of other
    long-term Asian crops.

    --
    | "Really, I'm not out to destroy Microsoft. That will just be a |
    | completely unintentional side effect. " -- Linus Torvalds |
    +--------------- D. C. Sessions <[email protected]> ----------+
     
  4. Doug

    Doug Guest

    "D. C. Sessions" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]
    > In <[email protected]>, Dave wrote:
    >
    > > Soy Toxins
    > > There's plenty yet that you didn't know about soy!

    >
    > Dave, aren't you the one who tells us that foods can't be
    > toxic? Soy has been used as a food in Asia for thousands
    > of years. It's so important that there are actually
    > holidays celebrating the discovery of soy products.
    >
    > Now, if you want to tell us that foods that have been used
    > in China and Korea for thousands of years can be dangerous,
    > you do run the risk that we might suspect the same of other
    > long-term Asian crops.
    >

    No no no,
    you got it wrong,
    soy bad
    ginseng good
    soy bad
    ginseng good
    soy bad
    ginseng good.......


    --
    "The emperor is naked!"
    "No he isn't, he's merely endorsing a clothing-optional lifestyle!"

    to email me
    Please remove "all your clothes"

    Doug
     
  5. Rich Andrews

    Rich Andrews Guest

    "Doug" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >
    > "D. C. Sessions" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:eek:[email protected]
    >> In <[email protected]>, Dave wrote:
    >>
    >> > Soy Toxins
    >> > There's plenty yet that you didn't know about soy!

    >>
    >> Dave, aren't you the one who tells us that foods can't be
    >> toxic? Soy has been used as a food in Asia for thousands
    >> of years. It's so important that there are actually
    >> holidays celebrating the discovery of soy products.
    >>
    >> Now, if you want to tell us that foods that have been used
    >> in China and Korea for thousands of years can be dangerous,
    >> you do run the risk that we might suspect the same of other
    >> long-term Asian crops.
    >>

    > No no no,
    > you got it wrong,
    > soy bad
    > ginseng good
    > soy bad
    > ginseng good
    > soy bad
    > ginseng good.......
    >


    Wabbit season!
    Duck season!
    Wabbit season ...


    r


    --
    Nothing beats the bandwidth of a station wagon filled with DLT tapes.
     
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