101 Ways To Completely Transform Your Entire Cycling Life

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by Lizel, Aug 17, 2015.

  1. Lizel

    Lizel Active Member

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    NO. 1
    To avoid muscle soreness and fatigue, don't hunch your shoulders. Tilt your head every few minutes to stave off tight neck muscles. Better yet: Stop to admire the scenery.

    NO. 2
    [​IMG]
    [SIZE=small](Brave the Woods)[/SIZE]
    By sliding rearward or forward on thesaddle, you can emphasize different muscle groups. This is useful on a long climb as a way to give various muscles a rest while others take over the work. Moving forward accentuates the quadriceps, while moving back emphasizes the hamstrings and glutes.

    NO. 3
    If you're not comfortable taking both hands off the bar, after pulling an arm warmer down with the opposite hand, use your teeth to pull the bundled fabric the rest of the way over your wrist and off.

    FREE SPEED: Three easy ways to go faster in a sprint







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    NO. 4 Don't move your upper body too much. Let your back serve as a fulcrum, with your bike swaying from side to side beneath it.

    NO. 5 Keep your shoulders behind the front wheel axle. Too much weight forward makes the bike hard to handle and could cause the rear wheel to skip up into the air.

    NO. 6 Pull on the bar with a rowing motion to counter the power of your legs. This helps transfer your energy to the pedals rather than into wasted movement.

    NO. 7
    If you don't have a chance to slow for an obstacle such as railroad tracks or a pothole, quickly pull upward on the handlebar to lift your front wheel. You may still damage the rear wheel, or it might suffer a pinch flat, but you'll prevent an impact on the front that could cause a crash.

    NO. 8
    Beware of creeping forward on the saddle and hunching your back when you're tired. Shift to a higher gear and stand to pedal periodically to prevent stiffness in your hips and back.

    NO. 9
    Relax your grip. On smooth, traffic-free pavement, practice draping your hands over the handlebar. This not only will help alleviate muscle tension, but also will reduce the amount of road vibration transmitted to your body.

    [​IMG]
    [SIZE=small](Brave the Woods)[/SIZE]

    NO. 10
    Periodically change hand position. Grasp the drops for descents or high-speed riding and the brake-lever hoods for relaxed cruising. On long climbs, hold the top of the bar to sit upright and open your chest for easier breathing. When standing, grasp the hoods lightly and gently rock the bike from side to side in sync with your pedal strokes. But always keep each thumb and a finger closed around the hood or bar to prevent yourself from losing control if you hit an unexpected bump.

    NO. 11
    Handlebar width should equal shoulder width. A wider bar opens your chest for breathing; a narrower one is generally more aerodynamic. Pick the one that favors your riding style. Position the angle of the bar so the bottom, flat portion is parallel to the ground, or else points just slightly down, toward the rear hub.

    [​IMG]

    NO. 12
    If you're leading a paceline up a hill, keep your cadence and pedal pressure constant by shifting to a lower gear.
     
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  2. Lizel

    Lizel Active Member

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    NO. 13
    Keep your arms in line with your body, not splayed elbows out. This is an easy way to make yourself more aerodynamicand go faster with no extra energy.

    NO. 14
    As your effort becomes harder, increase the force of your breaths rather than the frequency.

    NO. 15
    When riding in a group, always keep your hands in contact with your brakes, either in the drops or on the hoods. That way, you are always prepared to slow.

    NO. 16
    Cross railroad tracks near the side of the road. It's usually smoother there than in the center.

    NO. 17
    Don't stare at the rear wheel you're following in a paceline. Let your peripheral vision keep tabs while you look a couple of riders ahead to see what they're doing. Then you'll be prepared if something happens to make them veer or change speed. A paceline is like a Slinky: Little movements at the front magnify and speed up as they flow to the back of the pack.

    NO. 18
    Be extra cautious during the first 10 minutes of a rainstorm, when oil and dust float to the pavement's surface but haven't yet washed away. However: Painted road lines and steel surfaces (manhole covers, grates, railroad tracks, bridge decks, and expansion joints) get slippery right away and stay treacherous until they completely dry.

    [​IMG]
    [SIZE=small](Brave the Woods)[/SIZE]

    SURF LESSONS: How to flow through turbulent streets
    NO.19 Ride well into the lane when traffic is stop-and-go. You can usually move at least as fast as cars in heavy traffic, and if you hug the curb, you're less visible and drivers will be tempted to squeeze by you.

    NO.20 Stay far enough in the traffic lane to avoid being struck if doors on parked cars suddenly open. You'll likely hear some honks from motorists who don't understand why you won't pull to the right to let them pass—a honk in your ear hurts less than a door in your face.

    NO.21 When you stop at a light, move to the center of your lane. This prevents drivers from edging forward, trapping you between them and the curb. When the light changes, accelerate to your cruising speed before moving right to allow them to pass.

    NO.22 When you see cars stopped at cross streets, watch the front wheels for the first hint of forward movement. If you see any, get ready to brake, and yell to get the driver's attention.

    NO.23 On a road with no shoulder, ride in the right wheel track of motor vehicles to ensure you don't blend into the scenery along the edge of the road. This also gives you 3 to 4 feet of space from the edge of the pavement to let you dodge potholes or deal with wind gusts.

    NO.24 Scan the rear windows of parked cars for someone who might suddenly pull out into your lane or throw open a door. You can also spot pedestrians about to step out from between cars.

    NO.25 When you're in a bike lane and a car is making a right turn in front of your path, do not swerve out to the left and around. Slow down, stay in the lane, wait for the car to turn, then proceed.

    NO.26 Hold a straight line past cars that are intermittently parallel parked—don't weave in and out of empty spaces. Drivers might not be ready for you to suddenly reemerge into the traffic lane.

    NO. 27 If you hear a metallic click during every crank revolution, grease the pedal threads (and tighten firmly when reinstalling).

    NO. 28 A squeak is from a pedal rather than the chain if it occurs at the same place on each stroke. For conventional pedals, spray lubrication where the cage and body connect. For clipless pedals, clean all cleat contact points, then apply a silicone spray to these points and wipe off the excess. Also make sure the cleats are tight.

    NO. 29 A chirp is almost always from the chain—it is crying out for lubrication.

    NO. 30 If a chain clicks, it has a tight link. Turn the crank backward by hand and watch the chain as it winds through the rear derailleur pulleys. The inflexible link will jump. Grasp the chain on either side of the stiff link, bend it laterally to loosen it, then apply lube.

    NO. 31 If the handlebar or stem creaks during sprints or climbs, tighten the binder bolts (in front). If the noise persists, loosen the binder bolts and spray a light lubricant between the bar and stem, wipe it away to leave a thin film, then retighten firmly.

    NO. 32 Buzzing occurs when a cage, frame pump, or some other add-on vibrates, or when a cable housing quivers against the frame. To find the culprit, touch these areas while riding, then tighten, shorten, reroute, or tape as necessary.

    NO. 33 Rattles and jingles often come from a seat bag. Secure items with rubber bands or rags.

    NO. 34 Thumping is usually felt as much as heard. Common causes: dented rims and bulging or improperly seated tires.

    NO. 35 Clicks during out-of-saddle climbing and sprinting sometimes come from two spokes rubbing. Put a drop of oil on each spoke intersection.

    NO. 36 Never trust your ear. Frames transmit noises. You might swear a sound is coming from your cranks, but it could be your saddle rails. Check all possible points.

    NO. 37
    When you start to feel stressed and overwhelmed by a hard pace, try this breathing technique: Instead of actively drawing air into the lungs then passively letting it out (our normal pattern), push the air out and let it naturally flow back in. Bonus: Because of how you activate your lungs to do this, it also helps you get into a low riding position and maintain a flatter back.

    NO. 38
    On descents, your bike is much more stable when you're pedaling than when you're coasting.
    [​IMG]
    [SIZE=small](Joe Pugliese)[/SIZE]
    NO. 39
    Whenever you make the transition from standing to sitting, gain a few free inches by pushing the bike forward as you drop to the saddle.

    NO. 40
    Put your left foot down when stopping to prevent greasy chainring "tattoos" on your right calf.

    NO. 41
    Normally, applying the front brake harder than the rear is the most effective way to stop. On slick surfaces, however, braking hard up front invites a front-wheel skid, which will almost always result in a crash. Better to emphasize the rear brake. It's much easier to keep things under control if it's the back wheel that momentarily locks and slides.

    NO. 42
    Always ride with your elbows bent and your arms and shoulders relaxed. This prevents fatigue caused by muscle tension. It also allows your arms to absorb shock instead of transmitting it to your body.

    NO. 43
    When taking the lead position in a paceline, as the former leader drops to the back, don't accelerate. Maintain the same speed as when drafting so you don't cause gaps to open between the other riders.

    NO. 44
    If a headwind finally defeats you, don't let it ruin your day Accept the slower speed, shift to an easy gear, and work on your pedaling form and your ability to stay relaxed. (And don't feel bad that you pooped out: In terms of pedaling effort, a cyclist who travels 18 mph through calm air would have to work about twice as hard to maintain that speed into a mere 10-mph headwind.)

    [​IMG]
    [SIZE=small](Joe Pugliese)[/SIZE]

    NO. 45
    To build your confidence in a paceline, start by staying one bike length from the rider in front of you, then gradually close the gap as your experience and ability increase. Once you can ride comfortably within a wheel's length, you'll be getting most of the benefit of drafting, which can reduce by up to 35 percent the effort it takes to maintain a given speed.
    [​IMG]
    [SIZE=small](Joe Pugliese)[/SIZE]
    NO. 46
    To make a wet corner less treacherous, make your turn as shallow as possible. Set up wide so you enter from a shallow angle, steer straight through the turn, then exit wide. In effect, this transforms one tight turn into two shallow ones.

    NO. 47
    Occasionally take one hand off the bar and shake it. This relaxes your shoulder and elbow and encourages blood flow to your hand to prevent numbness.

    NO. 48
    When riding one-handed for any reason, grip the bar on top, next to thestem. If your hand is farther out (such as on the brake-lever hood), the bike is more likely to veer dangerously should the front wheel hit a rock, bump, or pothole.

    NO. 49
    To stave off muscle fatigue during hard, sustained pedaling, learn to "float" each leg every three or four strokes. Simply let your foot fall without exerting force.

    [​IMG]
    [SIZE=small](Brave the Woods)[/SIZE]
    HOW TO HEAL: Road rash—patches of abraded skin that result when you crash and slide across pavement—is painful but rarely serious, long-lasting, or likely to horrifically scar if you follow these six tips

    NO. 50 Quickly get to a place where you can thoroughly clean and disinfect the wound. It is less painful if done within 30 minutes of the crash, because nerve endings are still numb from the trauma.

    NO. 41
    Normally, applying the front brake harder than the rear is the most effective way to stop. On slick surfaces, however, braking hard up front invites a front-wheel skid, which will almost always result in a crash. Better to emphasize the rear brake. It's much easier to keep things under control if it's the back wheel that momentarily locks and slides.

    NO. 42
    Always ride with your elbows bent and your arms and shoulders relaxed. This prevents fatigue caused by muscle tension. It also allows your arms to absorb shock instead of transmitting it to your body.

    NO. 43
    When taking the lead position in a paceline, as the former leader drops to the back, don't accelerate. Maintain the same speed as when drafting so you don't cause gaps to open between the other riders.

    NO. 44
    If a headwind finally defeats you, don't let it ruin your day Accept the slower speed, shift to an easy gear, and work on your pedaling form and your ability to stay relaxed. (And don't feel bad that you pooped out: In terms of pedaling effort, a cyclist who travels 18 mph through calm air would have to work about twice as hard to maintain that speed into a mere 10-mph headwind.)

    [​IMG]
    [SIZE=small](Joe Pugliese)[/SIZE]

    NO. 45
    To build your confidence in a paceline, start by staying one bike length from the rider in front of you, then gradually close the gap as your experience and ability increase. Once you can ride comfortably within a wheel's length, you'll be getting most of the benefit of drafting, which can reduce by up to 35 percent the effort it takes to maintain a given speed.
    [​IMG]
    [SIZE=small](Joe Pugliese)[/SIZE]
    NO. 46
    To make a wet corner less treacherous, make your turn as shallow as possible. Set up wide so you enter from a shallow angle, steer straight through the turn, then exit wide. In effect, this transforms one tight turn into two shallow ones.

    NO. 47
    Occasionally take one hand off the bar and shake it. This relaxes your shoulder and elbow and encourages blood flow to your hand to prevent numbness.

    NO. 48
    When riding one-handed for any reason, grip the bar on top, next to thestem. If your hand is farther out (such as on the brake-lever hood), the bike is more likely to veer dangerously should the front wheel hit a rock, bump, or pothole.

    NO. 49
    To stave off muscle fatigue during hard, sustained pedaling, learn to "float" each leg every three or four strokes. Simply let your foot fall without exerting force.

    [​IMG]
    [SIZE=small](Brave the Woods)[/SIZE]
    HOW TO HEAL: Road rash—patches of abraded skin that result when you crash and slide across pavement—is painful but rarely serious, long-lasting, or likely to horrifically scar if you follow these six tips

    NO. 50 Quickly get to a place where you can thoroughly clean and disinfect the wound. It is less painful if done within 30 minutes of the crash, because nerve endings are still numb from the trauma.

    Soure and read more : http://www.bicycling.com/training/bike-skills/101-ways-completely-transform-your-entire-cycling-life
     
    Damien Lee likes this.
  3. RollingUphill

    RollingUphill New Member

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    Cool read and informative. I think it only made it up to number 50 and not 101 though. The one about hunching over is something that I'm guilty of. I always get hunched when rolling down hill. I've always though that it reduced drag. Might be wrong though. I'm going to have to try these suggestions though.
     
  4. cycleurhurkt

    cycleurhurkt New Member

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    Thank you very much for the information. These tips helped me a lot. Actually, these tips can convert you into a pro. Among all of them, No 27 was my favourite as I experience it very often.
     
  5. ZXD22

    ZXD22 Member

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    Wow thanks so much for the tips! They were very informative and there were a lot to study and learn from! Very nicely done!
     
  6. sharkantropo

    sharkantropo Member

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    Great tips, than you for the contribution. Though some are somewhat obvious, but good tips post overall. I did like how comprehensive it is.
     
  7. Damien Lee

    Damien Lee Active Member

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    Thanks Lizel! Those are all great tips and would benefit any experienced or would-be cyclist. Hunching is something that I struggled with in my early days of cycling. I realized it was contributing to muscle aches and bad posture and decided to rectify the situation.
     
  8. SirJoe

    SirJoe Active Member

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    Wow, great tips, I don't know if I will remember to put all of them into practice but they certain do help.
     
  9. cyclenthusias44

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    First of all, I would like to thank you for the wonderful post. I must say, I learned a lot from this post. I learned from all the 50 points. Thanks for the vast information.
     
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