2400 kcal high-carb diet equals weight loss

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by September, Jan 26, 2004.

  1. September

    September Guest

    Study links high-carbs and weight loss
    http://www.ohio.com/mld/ohio/news/7801389.htm

    CHICAGO - In the midst of the low-carb craze, a new study suggests that by eating lots of
    carbohydrates and little fat, it is possible to lose weight without actually cutting calories - and
    without exercising, either.

    The study was small, consisting of just 34 overweight adults who either ate the recommended diet
    for three months; ate the recommended diet and exercised regularly; or ate pretty much what they
    usually eat.

    All meals were prepared for participants, who were instructed to eat as much as they wanted. They
    also were told to return any uneaten food, which the researchers said enabled them to calculate
    calorie intake.

    Many doctors dispute whether people can lose weight without reducing their food intake, and at least
    one questioned the study's accuracy.

    But the diet is more compatible with conventional notions of healthful eating than the fatty, low-
    carbohydrate Atkins and South Beach diets.

    Participants on the recommended diet lost about 7 pounds without cutting calories and without
    exercise, and almost 11 pounds with 45 minutes of stationary bike-riding four times weekly. The
    control group lost no weight.

    The findings appear in Monday's Archives of Internal Medicine.

    Gary Foster, clinical director of the University of Pennsylvania's Weight and Eating Disorders
    Program, said he suspects participants who lost weight ate less than what was reported. He said that
    while he recommends a low-fat, high carb diet to patients, without calorie reduction it would be "a
    public health disaster."

    "The whole idea that you could lose weight without reducing energy intake flies in the face of 100
    years of data," Foster said.

    Lead author William Evans of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences stood by his findings.

    "Calories in minus calories out does not always determine the amount of weight loss," Evans said.
    "This is because we metabolize fats and carbohydrates very differently."

    American Dietetic Association spokeswoman Cindy Moore agreed and said with low-carb diets hogging
    the spotlight, "it may be a reminder that we can lose weight in a variety of different ways."

    Foods on the successful diets included high-fiber cereal, vegetarian chili, whole-wheat spaghetti,
    many fruits and vegetables, and skim milk. Daily calories totaled about 2,400, similar to
    participants' usual consumption.

    The control group also received prepared meals with similar calories, but the foods included
    sausage, scrambled eggs, macaroni and cheese, French fries, whole milk and fewer fruits and
    vegetables.

    The successful diet was not tested against Atkins and other low-carb regimens, which contain more
    fat and fewer carbs than the control group diet.

    Abstract from Archives of Internal Medicine:

    Effects of an Ad Libitum Low-Fat, High-Carbohydrate Diet on Body Weight, Body Composition, and Fat
    Distribution in Older Men and Women A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Nicholas P. Hays, PhD; Raymond D. Starling, PhD; Xiaolan Liu, MD; Dennis H. Sullivan, MD; Todd A.
    Trappe, PhD; James D. Fluckey, PhD; William J. Evans, PhD

    Arch Intern Med. 2004;164:210-217.

    Background: The efficacy of ad libitum low-fat diets in reducing body weight and fat in overweight
    and obese adults remains controversial.

    Methods: We examined the effect of a 12-week low-fat, high–complex carbohydrate diet alone (HI-CHO)
    and in combination with aerobic exercise training (HI-CHO + EX) on body weight and composition in 34
    individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (20 women and 14 men; mean ± SEM age, 66 ± 1 years).
    Participants were randomly assigned to a control diet (41% fat, 14% protein, 45% carbohydrates, and
    7 g of fiber per 1000 kcal), a HI-CHO diet (18% fat, 19% protein, 63% carbohydrates, and 26 g of
    fiber per 1000 kcal), or a HI-CHO diet plus endurance exercise 4 d/wk, 45 min/d, at 80% peak oxygen
    consumption (HI-CHO + EX). Participants were provided 150% of estimated energy needs and were
    instructed to consume food ad libitum. Total food intake, body composition, resting metabolic rate,
    and substrate oxidation were measured.

    Results: There was no significant difference in total food intake among the 3 groups and no
    change in energy intake over time. The HI-CHO + EX and HI-CHO groups lost more body weight (–4.8
    ± 0.9 kg [P
    = .003] and –3.2 ± 1.2 kg [P = .02]) and a higher percentage of body
    fat (–3.5% ± 0.7% [P = .01] and –2.2% ± 1.2% [P = .049]) than controls (–0.1 ± 0.6 kg and 0.2% ±
    0.6%). In addition, thigh fat area decreased in the HI-CHO (P = .003) and HI-CHO + EX (P<.001)
    groups compared with controls. High carbohydrate intake and weight loss did not result in a
    decreased resting metabolic rate or reduced fat oxidation.

    Conclusion: A high-carbohydrate diet consumed ad libitum, with no attempt at energy restriction or
    change in energy intake, results in losses of body weight and body fat in older men and women.
     
    Tags:


  2. Tcomeau

    Tcomeau Guest

    [email protected] (September) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Study links high-carbs and weight loss http://www.ohio.com/mld/ohio/news/7801389.htm
    >
    > CHICAGO - In the midst of the low-carb craze, a new study suggests that by eating lots of
    > carbohydrates and little fat, it is possible to lose weight without actually cutting calories -
    > and without exercising, either.
    >
    > The study was small, consisting of just 34 overweight adults who either ate the recommended diet
    > for three months; ate the recommended diet and exercised regularly; or ate pretty much what they
    > usually eat.
    >
    > All meals were prepared for participants, who were instructed to eat as much as they wanted. They
    > also were told to return any uneaten food, which the researchers said enabled them to calculate
    > calorie intake.
    >

    ---------------------------------
    Effects of an Ad Libitum Low-Fat, High-Carbohydrate Diet on Body Weight, Body Composition, and Fat
    Distribution in Older Men and Women A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Nicholas P. Hays, PhD; Raymond D. Starling, PhD; Xiaolan Liu, MD; Dennis H. Sullivan, MD; Todd A.
    Trappe, PhD; James D. Fluckey, PhD; William J. Evans, PhD

    Arch Intern Med. 2004;164:210-217.

    Background The efficacy of ad libitum low-fat diets in reducing body weight and fat in overweight
    and obese adults remains controversial.

    Methods We examined the effect of a 12-week low-fat, high–complex carbohydrate diet alone (HI-CHO)
    and in combination with aerobic exercise training (HI-CHO + EX) on body weight and composition in 34
    individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (20 women and 14 men; mean ± SEM age, 66 ± 1 years).
    Participants were randomly assigned to a control diet (41% fat, 14% protein, 45% carbohydrates, and
    7 g of fiber per 1000 kcal), a HI-CHO diet (18% fat, 19% protein, 63% carbohydrates, and 26 g of
    fiber per 1000 kcal), or a HI-CHO diet plus endurance exercise 4 d/wk, 45 min/d, at 80% peak oxygen
    consumption (HI-CHO + EX). Participants were provided 150% of estimated energy needs and were
    instructed to consume food ad libitum. Total food intake, body composition, resting metabolic rate,
    and substrate oxidation were measured.

    Results There was no significant difference in total food intake among the 3 groups and no change in
    energy intake over time. The HI-CHO + EX and HI-CHO groups lost more body weight (–4.8 ± 0.9 kg [P
    = .003] and –3.2 ± 1.2 kg [P = .02]) and a higher percentage of body
    fat (–3.5% ± 0.7% [P = .01] and –2.2% ± 1.2% [P = .049]) than controls (–0.1 ± 0.6 kg and 0.2% ±
    0.6%). In addition, thigh fat area decreased in the HI-CHO (P = .003) and HI-CHO + EX (P<.001)
    groups compared with controls. High carbohydrate intake and weight loss did not result in a
    decreased resting metabolic rate or reduced fat oxidation.

    Conclusion A high-carbohydrate diet consumed ad libitum, with no attempt at energy restriction or
    change in energy intake, results in losses of body weight and body fat in older men and women.

    From the Nutrition, Metabolism, and Exercise Laboratory, Donald W. Reynolds Department of
    Geriatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare
    System, Little Rock. Dr Starling is now with Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, Conn.
    The authors have no relevant financial interest in this article.

    -------------------------

    About the authors:

    Dennis H. Sullivan, M.D., Department of Geriatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences,
    Little Rock. Research on feeding tubes supported in part by Abbott Laboratories. (J. Amer. Coll.
    Nutr. 2000;19:446-50)

    William J. Evans, PhD:

    Oh lookee, the main author has written a book about.... dieting. And it isn't a low-carb diet, big
    surprise. Published last May.

    AstroFit: The Astronaut Program for Anti-Aging by William J. Evans (Author), Gerald Secor Couzens
    (Author) Paperback: 320 pages ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.81 x 8.42 x 5.53 Publisher: Free Press;
    (May 13, 2003) ISBN: 0743216822

    William J. Evans, Ph.D., a pioneer in the field of age reversal for more than twenty years, has
    worked as an expert adviser to NASA on nutrition and exercise since 1988, and is the former head of
    the Nutrition, Physical Fitness, and Rapid Rehabilitation Team of the National Space Biomedical
    Institution. He lives in Little Rock, Arkansas, with his wife and three children. --This text refers
    to the Hardcover edition.

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0743216822/qid=1075223574/sr=1-3/ref=sr_1_3/002-
    4008306-7455238?v=glance&s=books

    Gee I hope his study that found how good his diet is helps him make the top ten bestsellers list.

    At least Dr. Atkins had the ethics to let others do the studies on his diet.

    TC
     
  3. Jmk

    Jmk Guest

    tcomeau wrote:
    > At least Dr. Atkins had the ethics to let others do the studies on his diet.
    >
    > TC

    Yeah, for a fee...

    --
    jmk in NC
     
  4. September

    September Guest

    [email protected] (tcomeau) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (September) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Study links high-carbs and weight loss http://www.ohio.com/mld/ohio/news/7801389.htm
    > >
    > > CHICAGO - In the midst of the low-carb craze, a new study suggests that by eating lots of
    > > carbohydrates and little fat, it is possible to lose weight without actually cutting calories -
    > > and without exercising, either.
    > >
    > > The study was small, consisting of just 34 overweight adults who either ate the recommended diet
    > > for three months; ate the recommended diet and exercised regularly; or ate pretty much what they
    > > usually eat.
    > >
    > > All meals were prepared for participants, who were instructed to eat as much as they wanted.
    > > They also were told to return any uneaten food, which the researchers said enabled them to
    > > calculate calorie intake.
    > >
    >
    > ---------------------------------
    > Effects of an Ad Libitum Low-Fat, High-Carbohydrate Diet on Body Weight, Body Composition, and Fat
    > Distribution in Older Men and Women A Randomized Controlled Trial
    >
    > Nicholas P. Hays, PhD; Raymond D. Starling, PhD; Xiaolan Liu, MD; Dennis H. Sullivan, MD; Todd A.
    > Trappe, PhD; James D. Fluckey, PhD; William J. Evans, PhD
    >
    >
    > Arch Intern Med. 2004;164:210-217.
    >
    > Background The efficacy of ad libitum low-fat diets in reducing body weight and fat in overweight
    > and obese adults remains controversial.
    >
    > Methods We examined the effect of a 12-week low-fat, high?complex carbohydrate diet alone (HI-CHO)
    > and in combination with aerobic exercise training (HI-CHO + EX) on body weight and composition in
    > 34 individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (20 women and 14 men; mean ± SEM age, 66 ± 1
    > years). Participants were randomly assigned to a control diet (41% fat, 14% protein, 45%
    > carbohydrates, and 7 g of fiber per 1000 kcal), a HI-CHO diet (18% fat, 19% protein, 63%
    > carbohydrates, and 26 g of fiber per 1000 kcal), or a HI-CHO diet plus endurance exercise 4 d/wk,
    > 45 min/d, at 80% peak oxygen consumption (HI-CHO + EX). Participants were provided 150% of
    > estimated energy needs and were instructed to consume food ad libitum. Total food intake, body
    > composition, resting metabolic rate, and substrate oxidation were measured.
    >
    > Results There was no significant difference in total food intake among the 3 groups and no
    > change in energy intake over time. The HI-CHO + EX and HI-CHO groups lost more body weight (?4.8
    > ± 0.9 kg [P
    > = .003] and ?3.2 ± 1.2 kg [P = .02]) and a higher percentage of body
    > fat (?3.5% ± 0.7% [P = .01] and ?2.2% ± 1.2% [P = .049]) than controls (?0.1 ± 0.6 kg and 0.2% ±
    > 0.6%). In addition, thigh fat area decreased in the HI-CHO (P = .003) and HI-CHO + EX (P<.001)
    > groups compared with controls. High carbohydrate intake and weight loss did not result in a
    > decreased resting metabolic rate or reduced fat oxidation.
    >
    > Conclusion A high-carbohydrate diet consumed ad libitum, with no attempt at energy restriction or
    > change in energy intake, results in losses of body weight and body fat in older men and women.
    >
    >
    > From the Nutrition, Metabolism, and Exercise Laboratory, Donald W. Reynolds Department of
    > Geriatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare
    > System, Little Rock. Dr Starling is now with Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, Conn.
    > The authors have no relevant financial interest in this article.
    >
    > -------------------------
    >
    > About the authors:
    >
    > Dennis H. Sullivan, M.D., Department of Geriatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences,
    > Little Rock. Research on feeding tubes supported in part by Abbott Laboratories. (J. Amer. Coll.
    > Nutr. 2000;19:446-50)
    >
    >
    > William J. Evans, PhD:
    >
    > Oh lookee, the main author has written a book about.... dieting. And it isn't a low-carb diet, big
    > surprise. Published last May.
    >
    > AstroFit: The Astronaut Program for Anti-Aging by William J. Evans (Author), Gerald Secor Couzens
    > (Author) Paperback: 320 pages ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.81 x 8.42 x 5.53 Publisher: Free Press;
    > (May 13, 2003) ISBN: 0743216822
    >
    > William J. Evans, Ph.D., a pioneer in the field of age reversal for more than twenty years, has
    > worked as an expert adviser to NASA on nutrition and exercise since 1988, and is the former head
    > of the Nutrition, Physical Fitness, and Rapid Rehabilitation Team of the National Space Biomedical
    > Institution. He lives in Little Rock, Arkansas, with his wife and three children. --This text
    > refers to the Hardcover edition.
    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0743216822/qid=1075223574/sr=1-3/ref=sr_1_3/002-
    > 4008306-7455238?v=glance&s=books
    >
    > Gee I hope his study that found how good his diet is helps him make the top ten bestsellers list.
    >
    > At least Dr. Atkins had the ethics to let others do the studies on his diet.
    >
    > TC

    It has nothing to do with ethics. He didn't possess the aptitude to properly design and execute a
    study so he *had* to pay others to do it for him. Two people he paid are Eric Westman anf Jeff
    Volek, and surprise!, their studies show beneficial effects of low carb diets. How these two are any
    different from the "industry shills" you're always talking about, I have no clue. Atkins
    Nutritionals *is* an industry, in case you didn't know. Why no diatribes against them??

    And could you please explain how the data in this study came about? Did the authors just make
    it all up? Did the subjects actually gain weight? Did the subjects even exist? Inquiring minds
    want to know.
     
  5. Tcomeau

    Tcomeau Guest

    jmk <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > tcomeau wrote:
    > > At least Dr. Atkins had the ethics to let others do the studies on his diet.
    > >
    > > TC
    >
    > Yeah, for a fee...

    How can he possibly charge a fee for an independent researcher to study his diet? What researcher,
    specifically, has he charged a fee to study the Atkins diet?

    TC
     
  6. Tcomeau

    Tcomeau Guest

    [email protected] (September) wrote in message

    <snip>

    > >
    > > Gee I hope his study that found how good his diet is helps him make the top ten
    > > bestsellers list.
    > >
    > > At least Dr. Atkins had the ethics to let others do the studies on his diet.
    > >
    > > TC
    >
    > It has nothing to do with ethics. He didn't possess the aptitude to properly design and execute a
    > study so he *had* to pay others to do it for him.

    He was a least as qualified and capable as anyone to properly design and execute a study, the main
    difference is that he understands that when you do your own studies to support a commercial venture,
    you end up looking like a snake-oil salesman and you lose all credibility as a scientist, kinda like
    William J. Evans and Pritikin.

    Two people he paid are Eric Westman anf Jeff Volek, and
    > surprise!, their studies show beneficial effects of low carb diets. How these two are any
    > different from the "industry shills" you're always talking about, I have no clue. Atkins
    > Nutritionals *is* an industry, in case you didn't know. Why no diatribes against them??
    >

    The difference was that the funding was up front. If the funding is up front, then you can make up
    your own mind based on the design and the execution of the study. If the researchers do not declare
    their interests up front then the whole thing is suspect. Why did Evans not declare his interests up
    front? Why did he not have independent researchers do the research, why was he hiding his interests?

    > And could you please explain how the data in this study came about? Did the authors just make it
    > all up? Did the subjects actually gain weight? Did the subjects even exist? Inquiring minds want
    > to know.

    It really doesn't matter. The carbs were mixed up in a way that one cannot get any useful
    information regarding high-carb vs low-carb. The study means nothing, except that Evans is not very
    smart, either in business or science.

    TC
     
  7. Jmk

    Jmk Guest

    On 1/28/2004 10:25 AM, tcomeau wrote:
    > jmk <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >>tcomeau wrote:
    >>
    >>>At least Dr. Atkins had the ethics to let others do the studies on his diet.
    >>>
    >>>TC
    >>
    >>Yeah, for a fee...
    >
    >
    > How can he possibly charge a fee for an independent researcher to study his diet? What researcher,
    > specifically, has he charged a fee to study the Atkins diet?
    >
    > TC

    What independant researcher(s) do you speak of? Atkins companies provides grants to researchers
    looking into the effectivenss of their plan. Such research is not free of bias.

    --
    jmk in NC
     
  8. Tcomeau

    Tcomeau Guest

    jmk <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 1/28/2004 10:25 AM, tcomeau wrote:
    > > jmk <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > >
    > >>tcomeau wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>At least Dr. Atkins had the ethics to let others do the studies on his diet.
    > >>>
    > >>>TC
    > >>
    > >>Yeah, for a fee...
    > >
    > >
    > > How can he possibly charge a fee for an independent researcher to study his diet? What
    > > researcher, specifically, has he charged a fee to study the Atkins diet?
    > >
    > > TC
    >
    > What independant researcher(s) do you speak of? Atkins companies provides grants to researchers
    > looking into the effectivenss of their plan. Such research is not free of bias.

    Possibly not. But it is up front and honest about where the funding is coming from. The attitude is
    that there is nothing to hide. Unlike the myriad of studies that fail to disclose the source of
    funding and the conflicting interests of the researchers.

    At least with the atkins funded research you can take the funding into account when you look at the
    data, the methodology and the findings and make up your mind as to its scientific validity. Which is
    a hell of a lot more than you can say about the huge numbers of industry shills that fail to report
    their interests.

    TC
     
  9. Atkins nutritionals is one of the worst abusers and scammers in the entire food industry. I trust
    absolutely nothing that comes out of their mouth. They make fraudulent low carb products.

    i
     
  10. Tcomeau

    Tcomeau Guest

    [email protected] (September) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Study links high-carbs and weight loss http://www.ohio.com/mld/ohio/news/7801389.htm
    >
    > CHICAGO - In the midst of the low-carb craze, a new study suggests that by eating lots of
    > carbohydrates and little fat, it is possible to lose weight without actually cutting calories -
    > and without exercising, either.
    >

    Article: New High Carb Diet Study Appears to be Junk Science and Atkins Attack

    Thursday, January 29, 2004 By Steven Milloy, Fox News Already-confused dieters are no doubt reeling
    from reports this week of a new study linking a high-carbohydrate diet (search) with weight loss.
    Rather than well-conducted scientific research, though, the new study appears to be merely a junk
    science-fueled attack by government nannies on politically incorrect low-carbohydrate regimens like
    the Atkins Diet (search).

    "In the midst of the low-carb craze, a new study suggests that by eating lots of carbohydrates and
    little fat, it is possible to lose weight without actually cutting calories ? and without
    exercising, either," reported the Associated Press this week. "Revenge of the High-Carb Diet ? Ha!
    It Works, Too" was the Reuters headline. But unlike the sensationalistic media, which tend to limit
    their reporting of new study claims to regurgitated press releases and sound bites from study
    authors, I actually read the study in the Jan. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

    It didn't take long to discover why study subjects on the high-carbohydrate lost weight ? they ate
    fewer calories! The researchers divided the 34 study subjects into three groups: a control group of
    12 individuals who consumed a low-carbohydrate diet (search); a group of 11 individuals who consumed
    a high-carbohydrate diet; and a group of 11 individuals who consumed a high-carbohydrate diet and
    did aerobic exercise.

    Study subjects were provided with foods constituting 150 percent of their required daily caloric
    intake and instructed to eat as much as they wanted. Carbohydrates constituted 45 percent of the
    control groups' calories and about 62 percent for the high-carbohydrate groups. After 12 weeks, the
    study subjects on the control diet weighed the same as when the study started. But study subjects on
    the high-carbohydrate diet lost weight: about five pounds on average for those in the high-carbohydrate-
    only group and about 10 pounds for those in the high-carbohydrate-plus-exercise group. To the study
    authors and media, these superficial "results" apparently prove that you can lose weight while
    eating as many carbohydrates as you like ? and you don't even have to exercise. It might be a couch
    potato's fantasy come true ? except that the study details tell a different story.

    As it turns out, study subjects in the high-carbohydrate groups consumed about 400-600 calories less
    per day than those in the control group. Over the 12-week period of the study, then, the average
    study subject in the high-carbohydrate group consumed about 42,000 calories less than the average
    study subject in the control group. Since a pound of fat represents about 3,500 calories, it's no
    wonder why those in the high-carbohydrate group lost weight. It was because they ate less, not
    because of any magical effects of a high-carbohydrate diet.

    Although the media's apparent lack of interest in examining the actual study data is disappointing,
    the inaccurate description of the study to the media by lead author William J. Evans of the
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is even more dismaying. He told Reuters that the study
    subjects ate "around 2,500 calories per day," thereby implying that the only difference in their
    diets was the amount of carbohydrates. That's just plain misleading.

    Control group subjects averaged 2,825 calories per day during the 12-week study; high-carbohydrate
    group subjects averaged 2250 calories per day and high-carbohydrate-plus-exercise subjects averaged
    2,413 calories. Such variation over 12 weeks adds up to significant differences in total caloric
    intake and is most likely what produced the observed weight loss in the high-carbohydrate groups.
    The study authors then had the audacity to slam low-carbohydrate diets, such as the Atkins diet, as
    a means to lose weight. "Little evidence exists to support this idea," wrote the study authors. But
    it appears that there's not even that much evidence in favor of their all-the-carbs-you-can-eat
    idea. It's no secret that nutrition nannies in the federal government oppose high-protein/low-
    carbohydrate diets like the Atkins plan ? not because such diets don't work but because their fat-is-
    OK approach contradicts the nannies' low-fat dietary prescriptions of the last 30 years. (The irony
    of course is that obesity has supposedly skyrocketed while America went low-fat.)

    Evans and his group, not surprisingly, were funded by the National Institutes of Health, a
    government group that claims in bold-face on its Web site that "[High-protein/low-carb diets are]
    not a healthy way to lose weight!" That may or may not be true. Much more research is needed.
    Hopefully that research won't be conducted by biased, government-funded research hacks. Source:
    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,109890,00.htm

    ***
    Of course it's junk science. Pretty pathetic attempt too.

    TC
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>, tcomeau wrote:
    >> Study links high-carbs and weight loss
    > Article: New High Carb Diet Study Appears to be Junk Science and Atkins It didn't take long to
    > discover why study subjects on the high-carbohydrate lost weight ? they ate fewer calories! The
    > researchers divided the 34 study subjects into three groups: a control group of 12 individuals who
    > consumed a low-carbohydrate diet

    low carbing is not that different from the described experiment: severely limit one macronutrient,
    forbid junk food, put someone on eating regimen where it is hard to overeat.

    If that study is junk science, so is Dr Atkins diet, by your own logic.

    Truth is, any diet worth its salt should do something to make the dieter eat less and avoid junk
    food. Whether it is low carbing or eating only pre-made low fat foods, is secondary.

    I find that Fox News article to be absurd and even less impressive than the study it is attacking.
    Highly typical of Fox News.

    i
     
  12. taurusrc

    taurusrc Guest

    The whole problem with the wise nutrition experts is that for one person a diet may work and for
    another one the diet will not work. That is because not everyone has the same metabolism speed.

    One needs to eat less than they use - what works for one does not work for everyone.

    Ora
     
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