Affordable Campy bikes?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Kovie, Jul 1, 2004.

  1. Kovie

    Kovie Guest

    A friend of mine has been shopping around for a road bike and after many
    test rides strongly prefers Campy shifting, and a non-aluminum frame. The
    problem is finding one in her price range, which is $1200-$1600. She saw a
    Bianchi in a local store that came with Veloce 10s for $1400, but not in her
    size (51"). Can anyone advise on finding complete Campy-equipped road bikes
    in this price range, with a triple front and preferably 10 speed rear? She's
    willing to go mail order at this point as the pickings appear to be pretty
    slim here in Seattle. Everywhere she goes, it's almost all Shimano. (Not
    knocking Shimano here, she just prefers Campy.) Veloce's ok with her, as
    she's not a racer.

    Thanks!

    Kovie
    [email protected]zen
     
    Tags:


  2. On 07/01/2004 03:11 AM, in article 5zQEc.8006$%[email protected]_s01, "Kovie"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > A friend of mine has been shopping around for a road bike and after many
    > test rides strongly prefers Campy shifting, and a non-aluminum frame. The
    > problem is finding one in her price range, which is $1200-$1600. She saw a
    > Bianchi in a local store that came with Veloce 10s for $1400, but not in her
    > size (51"). Can anyone advise on finding complete Campy-equipped road bikes
    > in this price range, with a triple front and preferably 10 speed rear? She's
    > willing to go mail order at this point as the pickings appear to be pretty
    > slim here in Seattle. Everywhere she goes, it's almost all Shimano. (Not
    > knocking Shimano here, she just prefers Campy.) Veloce's ok with her, as
    > she's not a racer.




    Thought about asking the Bianchi dealer to ORDER her size?



    --
    Steven L. Sheffield
    stevens at veloworks dot com
    veloworks at worldnet dot ay tea tee dot net
    bellum pax est libertas servitus est ignoratio vis est
    ess ay ell tea ell ay kay ee sea aye tee why you ti ay aitch
    aitch tee tea pea colon [for word] slash [four ward] slash double-you
    double-yew double-ewe dot veloworks dot com [four word] slash
     
  3. Tom Robison

    Tom Robison Guest

    How about a good used bike?

    Tom
    "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:5zQEc.8006$%[email protected]_s01...
    > A friend of mine has been shopping around for a road bike and after many
    > test rides strongly prefers Campy shifting, and a non-aluminum frame. The
    > problem is finding one in her price range, which is $1200-$1600. She saw a
    > Bianchi in a local store that came with Veloce 10s for $1400, but not in

    her
    > size (51"). Can anyone advise on finding complete Campy-equipped road

    bikes
    > in this price range, with a triple front and preferably 10 speed rear?

    She's
    > willing to go mail order at this point as the pickings appear to be pretty
    > slim here in Seattle. Everywhere she goes, it's almost all Shimano. (Not
    > knocking Shimano here, she just prefers Campy.) Veloce's ok with her, as
    > she's not a racer.
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Kovie
    > [email protected]zen
    >
    >
     
  4. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Hi Kovie, To comment here, Wouldn't the local Bianchi Dealer in your
    area possibly order a bike for her?

    She seems to know exactly what size, and what grouppo she needs/wants.

    I own an NOS (2001) Bianchi Campione steel frame bike, with
    conventional geometry, and with Campy Veloce group, and have been very
    happy with the bike, particularly the Campy components. There's
    absolutely nothing wrong with Veloce, and properly maintained will
    give many years of fine service. The components are every bit as good
    as the older Nouvo Record hardware IMO.

    Naturally, not maintaining even the very best hardware can quickly
    deteriorate over time.

    Perhaps some dealers think that if they order one bike too many, that
    this is going to severly hinder them? Like it's going to put them out
    of business to order one too many bikes? I don't know?

    Going mail order is an option I suppose, and there's always a few
    dealers in the back of Bicycling Magazine who advertise good prices
    for Campy Equipped bikes.

    The only thing with going mail order, is that if there's a problem,
    there will be greater difficulty resolving any possible issues if
    there's something wrong.

    Generally bikes now days are packed very well in very strudy boxes, so
    it's not likely damage would occur enroute, but once the bike reaches
    its destination, it would need to be assembled/checked over. Actually
    not all that hard, as most the hard work is already done for the
    buyer. By buying mail order, there will be no local dealer support
    with the bike.

    Many local bike shops do offer one year free
    checkups/adjustments/repairs should something not be right, or go out
    of adjustments (Loose spokes, hard/improper shifting, tight bearings,
    defects, etc)

    Buying sight unseen though is difficult unless you know exactly what
    it is you are needing/buying. There's always the chance that when the
    bike arrives that something would not be suitable for her, or
    something she just doesn't like about the bike? In that scenario, she
    then has laid out $1200-$1600 for a bike she doesn't like, or want.
    There could be fit issues, or other minor issues such as a poor ill
    fitting saddle for example, etc, and now more cash would have to be
    spent to resolve these issues. So going mail order could possibly not
    be the cheapest/wisest way to go in the end.

    Hope these suggestions help you some. I'm hoping that whatever she
    should choose, that she is happy with the final outcome/purchase. Mark

    "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<5zQEc.8006$%[email protected]_s01>...
    > A friend of mine has been shopping around for a road bike and after many
    > test rides strongly prefers Campy shifting, and a non-aluminum frame. The
    > problem is finding one in her price range, which is $1200-$1600. She saw a
    > Bianchi in a local store that came with Veloce 10s for $1400, but not in her
    > size (51"). Can anyone advise on finding complete Campy-equipped road bikes
    > in this price range, with a triple front and preferably 10 speed rear? She's
    > willing to go mail order at this point as the pickings appear to be pretty
    > slim here in Seattle. Everywhere she goes, it's almost all Shimano. (Not
    > knocking Shimano here, she just prefers Campy.) Veloce's ok with her, as
    > she's not a racer.
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Kovie
    > [email protected]zen
     
  5. rosco

    rosco Guest

    "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:5zQEc.8006$%[email protected]_s01...
    > A friend of mine has been shopping around for a road bike and after many
    > test rides strongly prefers Campy shifting, and a non-aluminum frame. The
    > problem is finding one in her price range, which is $1200-$1600. She saw a
    > Bianchi in a local store that came with Veloce 10s for $1400, but not in

    her
    > size (51"). Can anyone advise on finding complete Campy-equipped road

    bikes
    > in this price range, with a triple front and preferably 10 speed rear?

    She's
    > willing to go mail order at this point as the pickings appear to be pretty
    > slim here in Seattle. Everywhere she goes, it's almost all Shimano. (Not
    > knocking Shimano here, she just prefers Campy.) Veloce's ok with her, as
    > she's not a racer.
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Kovie
    > [email protected]zen
    >
    >


    I got my wife a new steel Marinoni with a combination of Veloce and Centaur
    10 speed components for a little bit over $1600. We went up to Montreal to
    their factory and they did a fitting. She got to spec paint colors, paint
    pattern, decals and all the components. I've tried out her bicycle, and
    it's very nice. I can't wait to move up to Ergo shifters myself someday
    (I'm still on the downtube).
     
  6. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Kovie, To add some again here, While I only ever used one bike in my
    life that had a triple front, I didn't feel that it was essential in
    having a triple front, nor a 10-sp rear cassette.

    I would think that a double 39/53 front Chainring, with a 10-speed, or
    9-speed 13-26, or 13/29 should give her all the range she could
    possibly ever need.

    By going triple front, and 10-speed rear, the price naturally
    increases, just like buying a car with the fancy aluminum
    wheels/luxury group.

    Generally you'll find triples on a lot of modern Mountain bikes.

    I could be slightly wrong about this for her particular application,
    as I'm sure others may defend/tout the benefits/advantages of a Triple
    chainring.

    If she's climbing Alpe De Huez, well then maybe she needs these extra
    gear combos? Just my 2 cents, Mark



    "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<5zQEc.8006$%[email protected]_s01>...
    > A friend of mine has been shopping around for a road bike and after many
    > test rides strongly prefers Campy shifting, and a non-aluminum frame. The
    > problem is finding one in her price range, which is $1200-$1600. She saw a
    > Bianchi in a local store that came with Veloce 10s for $1400, but not in her
    > size (51"). Can anyone advise on finding complete Campy-equipped road bikes
    > in this price range, with a triple front and preferably 10 speed rear? She's
    > willing to go mail order at this point as the pickings appear to be pretty
    > slim here in Seattle. Everywhere she goes, it's almost all Shimano. (Not
    > knocking Shimano here, she just prefers Campy.) Veloce's ok with her, as
    > she's not a racer.
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Kovie
    > [email protected]zen
     
  7. andres muro

    andres muro Guest

    If there is a good bike shop in her area, I would suggest that she
    goes to the bike shop and ask them to order one in her size. If they
    are reluctant, it is an indication that they suck. If she is sure that
    she is a a size 51 and has a friend that can help her setting it up,
    etc, go mail order. There may be a shop in town that will appreciate
    the fact that she wants campy and help her with set up and maintenance
    for a fee. She will definitely save tons of money on ebay and it is a
    reliable source to get bikes especially from the established ebay
    shops.

    Andres



    "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<5zQEc.8006$%[email protected]_s01>...
    > A friend of mine has been shopping around for a road bike and after many
    > test rides strongly prefers Campy shifting, and a non-aluminum frame. The
    > problem is finding one in her price range, which is $1200-$1600. She saw a
    > Bianchi in a local store that came with Veloce 10s for $1400, but not in her
    > size (51"). Can anyone advise on finding complete Campy-equipped road bikes
    > in this price range, with a triple front and preferably 10 speed rear? She's
    > willing to go mail order at this point as the pickings appear to be pretty
    > slim here in Seattle. Everywhere she goes, it's almost all Shimano. (Not
    > knocking Shimano here, she just prefers Campy.) Veloce's ok with her, as
    > she's not a racer.
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Kovie
    > [email protected]zen
     
  8. andres muro

    andres muro Guest

    Hey Kovie:

    Here is one

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=7298&item=3685177825&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW

    Andres

    "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<5zQEc.8006$%[email protected]_s01>...
    > A friend of mine has been shopping around for a road bike and after many
    > test rides strongly prefers Campy shifting, and a non-aluminum frame. The
    > problem is finding one in her price range, which is $1200-$1600. She saw a
    > Bianchi in a local store that came with Veloce 10s for $1400, but not in her
    > size (51"). Can anyone advise on finding complete Campy-equipped road bikes
    > in this price range, with a triple front and preferably 10 speed rear? She's
    > willing to go mail order at this point as the pickings appear to be pretty
    > slim here in Seattle. Everywhere she goes, it's almost all Shimano. (Not
    > knocking Shimano here, she just prefers Campy.) Veloce's ok with her, as
    > she's not a racer.
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Kovie
    > [email protected]zen
     
  9. "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<5zQEc.8006$%[email protected]_s01>...
    > A friend of mine has been shopping around for a road bike and after many
    > test rides strongly prefers Campy shifting, and a non-aluminum frame. The
    > problem is finding one in her price range, which is $1200-$1600. She saw a
    > Bianchi in a local store that came with Veloce 10s for $1400, but not in her
    > size (51"). Can anyone advise on finding complete Campy-equipped road bikes
    > in this price range, with a triple front and preferably 10 speed rear? She's
    > willing to go mail order at this point as the pickings appear to be pretty
    > slim here in Seattle. Everywhere she goes, it's almost all Shimano. (Not
    > knocking Shimano here, she just prefers Campy.) Veloce's ok with her, as
    > she's not a racer.
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Kovie
    > [email protected]zen


    You might try Gary V Hobbs. He is down in Coos Bay Oregon I believe.
    Mail order. Seattle is within driving distance I suspect. A bit of a
    drive. $950 for 2004 Veloce triple build kit. Plus a frameset from
    his inventory. It looks like he has a variety in small sizes in a
    variety of materials. You may find one to your liking.

    http://www.gvhbikes.com/
     
  10. Kovie

    Kovie Guest

    "Russell Seaton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    news:<5zQEc.8006$%[email protected]_s01>...
    > > A friend of mine has been shopping around for a road bike and after many
    > > test rides strongly prefers Campy shifting, and a non-aluminum frame.

    The
    > > problem is finding one in her price range, which is $1200-$1600. She saw

    a
    > > Bianchi in a local store that came with Veloce 10s for $1400, but not in

    her
    > > size (51"). Can anyone advise on finding complete Campy-equipped road

    bikes
    > > in this price range, with a triple front and preferably 10 speed rear?

    She's
    > > willing to go mail order at this point as the pickings appear to be

    pretty
    > > slim here in Seattle. Everywhere she goes, it's almost all Shimano. (Not
    > > knocking Shimano here, she just prefers Campy.) Veloce's ok with her, as
    > > she's not a racer.
    > >
    > > Thanks!
    > >
    > > Kovie
    > > [email protected]zen

    >
    > You might try Gary V Hobbs. He is down in Coos Bay Oregon I believe.
    > Mail order. Seattle is within driving distance I suspect. A bit of a
    > drive. $950 for 2004 Veloce triple build kit. Plus a frameset from
    > his inventory. It looks like he has a variety in small sizes in a
    > variety of materials. You may find one to your liking.
    >
    > http://www.gvhbikes.com/


    Thanks! This sounds like a great place from all the options they have on
    their site. Shipping for complete bikes is only $25 so it's not necessary to
    drive there, but it's nice to know that it's not THAT far. Thanks again.

    --
    Kovie
    [email protected]zen
     
  11. Kovie

    Kovie Guest

    "Mark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Kovie, To add some again here, While I only ever used one bike in my
    > life that had a triple front, I didn't feel that it was essential in
    > having a triple front, nor a 10-sp rear cassette.
    >
    > I would think that a double 39/53 front Chainring, with a 10-speed, or
    > 9-speed 13-26, or 13/29 should give her all the range she could
    > possibly ever need.
    >
    > By going triple front, and 10-speed rear, the price naturally
    > increases, just like buying a car with the fancy aluminum
    > wheels/luxury group.
    >
    > Generally you'll find triples on a lot of modern Mountain bikes.
    >
    > I could be slightly wrong about this for her particular application,
    > as I'm sure others may defend/tout the benefits/advantages of a Triple
    > chainring.
    >
    > If she's climbing Alpe De Huez, well then maybe she needs these extra
    > gear combos? Just my 2 cents, Mark
    >
    >
    >
    > "Kovie" <kov[email protected]> wrote in message

    news:<5zQEc.8006$%[email protected]_s01>...
    > > A friend of mine has been shopping around for a road bike and after many
    > > test rides strongly prefers Campy shifting, and a non-aluminum frame.

    The
    > > problem is finding one in her price range, which is $1200-$1600. She saw

    a
    > > Bianchi in a local store that came with Veloce 10s for $1400, but not in

    her
    > > size (51"). Can anyone advise on finding complete Campy-equipped road

    bikes
    > > in this price range, with a triple front and preferably 10 speed rear?

    She's
    > > willing to go mail order at this point as the pickings appear to be

    pretty
    > > slim here in Seattle. Everywhere she goes, it's almost all Shimano. (Not
    > > knocking Shimano here, she just prefers Campy.) Veloce's ok with her, as
    > > she's not a racer.
    > >
    > > Thanks!
    > >
    > > Kovie
    > > [email protected]zen


    There's no lack of challenging hills around Seattle that call for triples,
    and they don't really add that much weight or cost to bikes these days. I
    built myself a triple last year and would have done a lot more walking had I
    gone double. And hey, aren't you required by law to have a triple once you
    turn 40? ;-)

    --
    Kovie
    [email protected]zen
     
  12. Kovie

    Kovie Guest

    "Mark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi Kovie, To comment here, Wouldn't the local Bianchi Dealer in your
    > area possibly order a bike for her?
    >
    > She seems to know exactly what size, and what grouppo she needs/wants.
    >
    > I own an NOS (2001) Bianchi Campione steel frame bike, with
    > conventional geometry, and with Campy Veloce group, and have been very
    > happy with the bike, particularly the Campy components. There's
    > absolutely nothing wrong with Veloce, and properly maintained will
    > give many years of fine service. The components are every bit as good
    > as the older Nouvo Record hardware IMO.
    >
    > Naturally, not maintaining even the very best hardware can quickly
    > deteriorate over time.
    >
    > Perhaps some dealers think that if they order one bike too many, that
    > this is going to severly hinder them? Like it's going to put them out
    > of business to order one too many bikes? I don't know?
    >
    > Going mail order is an option I suppose, and there's always a few
    > dealers in the back of Bicycling Magazine who advertise good prices
    > for Campy Equipped bikes.
    >
    > The only thing with going mail order, is that if there's a problem,
    > there will be greater difficulty resolving any possible issues if
    > there's something wrong.
    >
    > Generally bikes now days are packed very well in very strudy boxes, so
    > it's not likely damage would occur enroute, but once the bike reaches
    > its destination, it would need to be assembled/checked over. Actually
    > not all that hard, as most the hard work is already done for the
    > buyer. By buying mail order, there will be no local dealer support
    > with the bike.
    >
    > Many local bike shops do offer one year free
    > checkups/adjustments/repairs should something not be right, or go out
    > of adjustments (Loose spokes, hard/improper shifting, tight bearings,
    > defects, etc)
    >
    > Buying sight unseen though is difficult unless you know exactly what
    > it is you are needing/buying. There's always the chance that when the
    > bike arrives that something would not be suitable for her, or
    > something she just doesn't like about the bike? In that scenario, she
    > then has laid out $1200-$1600 for a bike she doesn't like, or want.
    > There could be fit issues, or other minor issues such as a poor ill
    > fitting saddle for example, etc, and now more cash would have to be
    > spent to resolve these issues. So going mail order could possibly not
    > be the cheapest/wisest way to go in the end.
    >
    > Hope these suggestions help you some. I'm hoping that whatever she
    > should choose, that she is happy with the final outcome/purchase. Mark
    >
    > "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    news:<5zQEc.8006$%[email protected]_s01>...
    > > A friend of mine has been shopping around for a road bike and after many
    > > test rides strongly prefers Campy shifting, and a non-aluminum frame.

    The
    > > problem is finding one in her price range, which is $1200-$1600. She saw

    a
    > > Bianchi in a local store that came with Veloce 10s for $1400, but not in

    her
    > > size (51"). Can anyone advise on finding complete Campy-equipped road

    bikes
    > > in this price range, with a triple front and preferably 10 speed rear?

    She's
    > > willing to go mail order at this point as the pickings appear to be

    pretty
    > > slim here in Seattle. Everywhere she goes, it's almost all Shimano. (Not
    > > knocking Shimano here, she just prefers Campy.) Veloce's ok with her, as
    > > she's not a racer.
    > >
    > > Thanks!
    > >
    > > Kovie
    > > [email protected]zen


    She'll get a complete sizing/fitting at a local bike shop first, and has
    already gone on several test rides with different component groups and
    setups, and pretty much knows what she wants at this point, so there
    shouldn't be major fit issues that can't be adjusted locally. It wouldn't
    hurt to have the fork steerer tube cut long with extra spacers just in case
    it needs lowering, though.

    --
    Kovie
    [email protected]zen
     
  13. Appkiller

    Appkiller Guest

    "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<5zQEc.8006$%[email protected]_s01>...
    > A friend of mine has been shopping around for a road bike and after many
    > test rides strongly prefers Campy shifting, and a non-aluminum frame. The
    > problem is finding one in her price range, which is $1200-$1600. She saw a
    > Bianchi in a local store that came with Veloce 10s for $1400, but not in her
    > size (51"). Can anyone advise on finding complete Campy-equipped road bikes
    > in this price range, with a triple front and preferably 10 speed rear? She's
    > willing to go mail order at this point as the pickings appear to be pretty
    > slim here in Seattle. Everywhere she goes, it's almost all Shimano. (Not
    > knocking Shimano here, she just prefers Campy.) Veloce's ok with her, as
    > she's not a racer.
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Kovie
    > [email protected]zen


    Try Marin bicycles.

    App
     
  14. ZeeExSixAre

    ZeeExSixAre Guest

    Appkiller wrote:
    > "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<5zQEc.8006$%[email protected]_s01>...
    >> A friend of mine has been shopping around for a road bike and after
    >> many test rides strongly prefers Campy shifting, and a non-aluminum
    >> frame. The problem is finding one in her price range, which is
    >> $1200-$1600. She saw a Bianchi in a local store that came with
    >> Veloce 10s for $1400, but not in her size (51"). Can anyone advise
    >> on finding complete Campy-equipped road bikes in this price range,
    >> with a triple front and preferably 10 speed rear? She's willing to
    >> go mail order at this point as the pickings appear to be pretty slim
    >> here in Seattle. Everywhere she goes, it's almost all Shimano. (Not
    >> knocking Shimano here, she just prefers Campy.) Veloce's ok with
    >> her, as she's not a racer.
    >>
    >> Thanks!
    >>
    >> Kovie
    >> [email protected]zen

    >
    > Try Marin bicycles.
    >
    > App


    According to the website, of the 2004's there's only the Stelvio that has
    Campy. Is this what you're referring to?

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  15. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On 1 Jul 2004 09:44:30 -0700, [email protected] (andres muro) wrote:

    >If there is a good bike shop in her area, I would suggest that she
    >goes to the bike shop and ask them to order one in her size. If they
    >are reluctant, it is an indication that they suck.


    There is a reality that you are not aware of. Bicycle shops are
    always in debt to the bicycle mfg. Frequently, they are late with
    their payments. When the shop wants to order another bike, they must
    pay for that bicycle plus some of their outstanding debt.
     
  16. Russ Baxter

    Russ Baxter Guest

    [email protected] (Mark) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Kovie, To add some again here, While I only ever used one bike in my
    > life that had a triple front, I didn't feel that it was essential in
    > having a triple front, nor a 10-sp rear cassette.
    >
    > I would think that a double 39/53 front Chainring, with a 10-speed, or
    > 9-speed 13-26, or 13/29 should give her all the range she could
    > possibly ever need.
    >
    > By going triple front, and 10-speed rear, the price naturally
    > increases, just like buying a car with the fancy aluminum
    > wheels/luxury group.
    >
    > Generally you'll find triples on a lot of modern Mountain bikes.
    >
    > I could be slightly wrong about this for her particular application,
    > as I'm sure others may defend/tout the benefits/advantages of a Triple
    > chainring.
    >
    > If she's climbing Alpe De Huez, well then maybe she needs these extra
    > gear combos? Just my 2 cents, Mark



    If you go with a double chainring, I would try a compact set that
    could accomodate a 48/34. It would allow a tighter cluster in back
    with the same low gear and a high gear that would suit all but racers.
     
  17. In article <5zQEc.8006$%[email protected]_s01>,
    Kovie <[email protected]> wrote:
    >A friend of mine has been shopping around for a road bike and after many
    >test rides strongly prefers Campy shifting, and a non-aluminum frame. The
    >problem is finding one in her price range, which is $1200-$1600. She saw a
    >Bianchi in a local store that came with Veloce 10s for $1400, but not in her
    >size (51"). Can anyone advise on finding complete Campy-equipped road bikes
    >in this price range, with a triple front and preferably 10 speed rear? She's
    >willing to go mail order at this point as the pickings appear to be pretty
    >slim here in Seattle. Everywhere she goes, it's almost all Shimano. (Not
    >knocking Shimano here, she just prefers Campy.) Veloce's ok with her, as
    >she's not a racer.


    For $1600 you should be able to find a build kit and an inexpensive
    frame. For example, http://www.gvhbikes.com/ sells a Veloce 10s
    triple build kit for $950. Finding a frame and fork for $650 or
    less should not be too hard. A used steel frame and fork at $650
    would be very high quality relative to new. There is not much out
    there in terms of mass-produced entry level road bikes with Campy
    parts sitting on showroom floors.

    Did the local Bianchi shop do a thorough search for a bike? If properly
    motivated they may be able to obtain one from another dealer, if Bianchi
    doesn't have one.
     
  18. In article <5zQEc.8006$%[email protected]_s01>, [email protected]zen says...
    >
    >
    >A friend of mine has been shopping around for a road bike and after many
    >test rides strongly prefers Campy shifting, and a non-aluminum frame. The
    >problem is finding one in her price range, which is $1200-$1600. She saw a
    >Bianchi in a local store that came with Veloce 10s for $1400, but not in her
    >size (51"). Can anyone advise on finding complete Campy-equipped road bikes
    >in this price range, with a triple front and preferably 10 speed rear? She's
    >willing to go mail order at this point as the pickings appear to be pretty
    >slim here in Seattle. Everywhere she goes, it's almost all Shimano. (Not
    >knocking Shimano here, she just prefers Campy.) Veloce's ok with her, as
    >she's not a racer.


    The obvious answer is to have a LBS order the right size for her.
    ------------
    Alex
     
  19. Kovie

    Kovie Guest

    Obviously. I should have mentioned in my original post that she needs this
    bike within the next week, as she's doing a 200 mile ride two weekends from
    now and wants to break it in for at least a week. Ordering would probably
    take several weeks. From the responses I've gotten it looks like ordering a
    bike from GVH is the way to go.

    --
    Kovie
    [email protected]zen


    "Alex Rodriguez" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <5zQEc.8006$%[email protected]_s01>, [email protected]zen

    says...
    > >
    > >
    > >A friend of mine has been shopping around for a road bike and after many
    > >test rides strongly prefers Campy shifting, and a non-aluminum frame. The
    > >problem is finding one in her price range, which is $1200-$1600. She saw

    a
    > >Bianchi in a local store that came with Veloce 10s for $1400, but not in

    her
    > >size (51"). Can anyone advise on finding complete Campy-equipped road

    bikes
    > >in this price range, with a triple front and preferably 10 speed rear?

    She's
    > >willing to go mail order at this point as the pickings appear to be

    pretty
    > >slim here in Seattle. Everywhere she goes, it's almost all Shimano. (Not
    > >knocking Shimano here, she just prefers Campy.) Veloce's ok with her, as
    > >she's not a racer.

    >
    > The obvious answer is to have a LBS order the right size for her.
    > ------------
    > Alex
    >
     
  20. andres muro

    andres muro Guest

    Yeahh, I forgot about gary hobbs. I bought a frame from him a while
    back. really nice guy.

    Andres

    "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<b8YEc.9067$%[email protected]_s01>...
    > "Russell Seaton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > news:<5zQEc.8006$%[email protected]_s01>...
    > > > A friend of mine has been shopping around for a road bike and after many
    > > > test rides strongly prefers Campy shifting, and a non-aluminum frame.

    > The
    > > > problem is finding one in her price range, which is $1200-$1600. She saw

    > a
    > > > Bianchi in a local store that came with Veloce 10s for $1400, but not in

    > her
    > > > size (51"). Can anyone advise on finding complete Campy-equipped road

    > bikes
    > > > in this price range, with a triple front and preferably 10 speed rear?

    > She's
    > > > willing to go mail order at this point as the pickings appear to be

    > pretty
    > > > slim here in Seattle. Everywhere she goes, it's almost all Shimano. (Not
    > > > knocking Shimano here, she just prefers Campy.) Veloce's ok with her, as
    > > > she's not a racer.
    > > >
    > > > Thanks!
    > > >
    > > > Kovie
    > > > [email protected]zen

    > >
    > > You might try Gary V Hobbs. He is down in Coos Bay Oregon I believe.
    > > Mail order. Seattle is within driving distance I suspect. A bit of a
    > > drive. $950 for 2004 Veloce triple build kit. Plus a frameset from
    > > his inventory. It looks like he has a variety in small sizes in a
    > > variety of materials. You may find one to your liking.
    > >
    > > http://www.gvhbikes.com/

    >
    > Thanks! This sounds like a great place from all the options they have on
    > their site. Shipping for complete bikes is only $25 so it's not necessary to
    > drive there, but it's nice to know that it's not THAT far. Thanks again.
     
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