apparel for the wet & cold



Status
Not open for further replies.
P

Peter Cole

Guest
"Erik Brooks" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]_s01>...
> > "Bruce" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]...
> > > Waterproof and breathable fabrics work great, but you have to know their limits. It amazes me
> > > when people complain about sweating when it's
cold.
> > > If you hate sweating either unzip and cool off or give up riding!
> ><snip!> Why complain if it works so well you have too much heat!! Adjust!!
> >
> > Perhaps you haven't ridden in the rain. If you unzip your jacket, you'll
get
> > soaked.
>
> I'm a multi-year, year around Seattle bike commuter. I've ridden the rain lots, and I thought that
> Bruce's comments were the most sensible of the lot.
>
> Peter, maybe you have the wrong jacket? I'm happy with my Burley, and I've heard lots of other
> positives about the brand. I'm zipping up and down often, raining or not. The jacket should make
> it easy to make adjustments, and it's important to do the adjustments 'before you need them'. I
> view it like the excellent advice about eating and drinking during physical efforts - if you wait
> til you are hungry or thirsty, you've put off the eating or drinking too long for optimim
> performance.
>
> In the case of rainwear, I think it's important to have good pit zips, 2 way zippers, and also to
> have good fenders.

I've used jackets of all materials and features, and I've never found one that could keep up with my
sweating. I find membrane fabrics to be particularly worthless (given the high price). I also hate
anything loose or flapping when I ride. If it's below 40F and raining, I just wear a DWR treated
jacket (with vents) and plan to get wet from sweat. Synthetic fleece absorbs less than anything else
(including wool), I cover myself from head to toe in stretch fleece (jersey, tights, socks).
Smartwool is great (I have a dozen pair of socks in all lengths & weights), until it gets wet. I
know several people with Burley and PI jackets, they're OK, not miraculous.

Cold rain is about the toughest thing to ride in, with the possible exception of sub-freezing,
heavily salted, snowy roads, where you get splashed with icy brine. Of all things, I hate cold, wet
feet, butt and hands. Fenders make a world of difference. I use full neoprene foam (industrial)
gloves and latex shoe covers, neoprene booties never seemed waterproof enough.

Around here (Boston), it seems the only winter riders are the commuters and the "fitness" types (I'm
in the latter category). Sweat is much less of a problem when you're cycling at a moderate
intensity. If I was commuting, I'd just use a cape and pace myself.
 
C

Claire Petersky

Guest
"Steve Sanfratello" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:eek:[email protected]...
> The temperature is dropping around here and we've had some rainy days too. What do you suggest
> that I wear on commutes and entertainment rides?
>
> Is Gor-tex unbeatable, or can an simple fabric like nylon compete?

I am a year-round bike commuter in the Seattle area. Around here, typical winter riding is in the
lower 40s and raining. I have a Sugoi Bosui Vapor Urban jacket, (like this:
http://www.sugoi.ca/sugoimain/main.aspx?sectionStyleID=4482&color=MER) which I got on clearance at
REI one spring -- I think I paid half of the MSRP of $150 US. This jacket does a fine job of keeping
my upper torso dry. If it's very wet, rain will start to trickle in through the elastic on the
sleeves at the wrists, and also down the neck, depending.

But the reality is, if it's really raining, you'll get wet. But wet does not mean uncomfortable. It
just means wet. If you've got enough and the right layers on, you'll be wet on your legs, and have
possibly wet feet, and your gloves will be so wet you wring them out at the stoplights. But that
doesn't mean cold. I rode all wet like that on Monday last week, and was comfortable. It helps to
have wool socks, and neoprene booties for the feet, and a wool sweater under the jacket.

--
Warm Regards,

Claire Petersky Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato and .net for .com

Home of the meditative cyclist: http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm

Books just wanna be FREE! See what I mean at: http://bookcrossing.com/friend/Cpetersky
 
M

Murray

Guest
Race Face makes brilliant wet weather gear.. I ride the West Coast of Canada..daily... Race face
waterproof gloves and their Aquamax 10,000 denier..yep...10K ultralite jacket allow you to pretty
much ride under waterfalls... You must layer and ventilate appropriately for the cold, but once you
seal yourself up you arrive at your destination intact and not like a drowned rat!!! You should
consider spending a buck and getting quality gear.. It does make a world of difference if you take
your riding seriously.. If you are truly just pissing about having fun in the rain the occasional
weekend..go for the cheap stuff.. I would suggest similar quality pants and boots if you are
intending on commuting... Really, though... the poor quality plastic/rubbery gear just gets you
steamed up inside ... not at all pleasant.. Good luck.. Murray



On Mon, 24 Nov 2003 17:16:38 -0500, Steve Sanfratello <[email protected]> wrote:

>The temperature is dropping around here and we've had some rainy days too. What do you suggest that
>I wear on commutes and entertainment rides?
>
>Is Gor-tex unbeatable, or can an simple fabric like nylon compete?
>
>This Proproe suit looks interesting and cheap : http://www.rainshield.com/
>
>I've never commuted by cycle, in the winter, before so I'm looking for people with advice and
>experience with the variety of fabrics out there.
 
R

Roberth

Guest
"Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]_s51>...

<snip>

> Around here (Boston), it seems the only winter riders are the commuters and the "fitness" types
> (I'm in the latter category). Sweat is much less of a problem when you're cycling at a moderate
> intensity. If I was commuting, I'd just use a cape and pace myself.

Don't forget the messengers. never get a day off for weather.

Robert
 
B

Bbense+Rec Bicy

Guest
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

In article <[email protected]>, David Reuteler
<[email protected]> wrote:
>Jay Beattie <[email protected]> wrote:
>: There are essentially two schools of thought when it comes to dressing for rain: (1) stay as dry
>: as possible using some sort of waterproof covering, anything from a dry-suit to a cape, and (2)
>: getting wet and instead focusing on staying warm and streamline.
>
>heh. well, that nails it. i fall into number 2. wool can take a while to dry out (but not *that*
>long) but at least you're comfortable while it does. i've ridden in 0C near soaked in wool and been
>reasonably comfortable. i do wear shoe covers, thick wool socks, a wool l/s underlayer or 2, a l/s
>wool jersey and some sort of water resistant outer layer (not wool, but some light stretchy junk),
>a neck gaitor and wool glove liner and good pair of gloves made from dead cow.

_ If you're in number 2 you should take a long look at various
"soft shell" fabrics that are gaining popularity in the
backpacking/climbing/skiing world. These work a lot like
wool, but dry faster and are more wind/water resistant.

_ In particular, the pants in munich pant style make great cold weather cycling pants. You can get
this gear relatively cheap at www.mec.ca. I'm kind of suprised this gear hasn't yet crossed over
into the cycling world.

_ Booker C. Bense

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: 2.6.2

iQCVAwUBP8TLPWTWTAjn5N/lAQG0NQP8CvkRrXayfyGrBlNM99CfYlwoBNZfs22V
7Bnq04UqNQIK3bPPJKLc87xE/aqdZohDfoK8ZMeZuloT4tnZ/JRx1B8bHaH2hgCH
rhJnX5HSPBMEdxgiMlHo86T+TB4oVnaAmYmhz1QEAWqR5lW5ao/KaVxV66mBCUqo DGWkxs2lz5o= =P5JB -----END PGP
SIGNATURE-----
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads