BARBEQUE WOOD TYPES

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by D, Feb 16, 2004.

  1. D

    D Guest

    Hello, My brother and I have been smoking hogs for years with various methods. We have generally
    always used Oak wood, but on occasion used Hickory, and a real good one is Orange (citrus) tree wood
    which gives a great flavor but alas all of the citrus business has moved further south of here now.
    We always knew to stay away from sap rich woods like pine unless you wanted your meat to taste like
    turpentine. But my question is, I have a continuing supply of hege wood that comes from Sweet
    Viburnum hedge. I've been hauling this stuff off for years and I wonder if one could actually
    barbeque with this wood. I've searched for info on any poisons that might be in the wood with no
    success. Does anyone know of this type of wood being used or any information at all on it ? Thanks
    to all replies.
     
    Tags:


  2. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest

    > But my question is, I have a continuing supply of hege wood that comes from Sweet Viburnum hedge.
    > I've been hauling this stuff off for years and I wonder if one could actually barbeque with this
    > wood. I've searched for info on any poisons that might be in the wood with no success. Does
    > anyone know of this type of wood being used or any information at all on it ? Thanks to all
    > replies.

    well it does not come up in the poisonous list. there are a lot of great smoking woods. Lilac was
    fantastic. citrus as you found is good. cherry is good. burn some and see if you like the smoke
    smell from it.

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices See http://www.knight-
    toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
  3. EskWIRED

    EskWIRED Guest

    In rec.food.cooking, Steve Knight <[email protected]> wrote:

    > burn some and see if you like the smoke smell from it.

    Good advice. Just light a small splint and blow it out. Sniff the resulting smoke.

    --
    ...I'm an air-conditioned gypsy...

    - The Who
     
  4. Mark Thorson

    Mark Thorson Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > In rec.food.cooking, Steve Knight <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > burn some and see if you like the smoke smell from it.
    >
    > Good advice. Just light a small splint and blow it out. Sniff the resulting smoke.

    Lousy advice. You don't know what flavor will be imparted to the meat from that test. There may be
    volatile flavors in the smoke which won't persist in the meat, if it's allowed to cook for a long
    time. A much better test would be to buy some cheap meat and try smoking a batch with the wood.
     
  5. Loki

    Loki Guest

    il Sun, 15 Feb 2004 01:32:32 +0000 (UTC),
    [email protected] ha scritto:

    > In rec.food.cooking, Steve Knight <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > burn some and see if you like the smoke smell from it.
    >
    > Good advice. Just light a small splint and blow it out. Sniff the resulting smoke.

    Do not try this with Oleander wood, even the smoke is poisonous. Don't you have a Poisons Centre you
    can ring to find out?

    > --
    > ...I'm an air-conditioned gypsy...
    >
    > - The Who

    --
    Cheers, Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]
     
  6. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > In rec.food.cooking, Steve Knight <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > > burn some and see if you like the smoke smell from it.
    > >
    > > Good advice. Just light a small splint and blow it out. Sniff the resulting smoke.
    >
    > Lousy advice. You don't know what flavor will be imparted to the meat from that test. There may be
    > volatile flavors in the smoke which won't persist in the meat, if it's allowed to cook for a long
    > time. A much better test would be to buy some cheap meat and try smoking a batch with the wood.
    >
    >
    >

    Agreed... That is what I'd do too. Some chicken hindquarters might work. :)

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katra at centurytel dot net>,,<
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  7. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> In rec.food.cooking, Steve Knight <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> burn some and see if you like the smoke smell from it.
    >>
    >> Good advice. Just light a small splint and blow it out. Sniff the resulting smoke.
    >
    > Lousy advice. You don't know what flavor will be imparted to the meat from that test. There may be
    > volatile flavors in the smoke which won't persist in the meat, if it's allowed to cook for a long
    > time. A much better test would be to buy some cheap meat and try smoking a batch with the wood.

    Have you actually cooked much using wood as a flavoring for the food (not just meat)?

    BOB
     
  8. Zxcvbob

    Zxcvbob Guest

    Mark Thorson wrote:

    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >
    >>In rec.food.cooking, Steve Knight <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>burn some and see if you like the smoke smell from it.
    >>
    >>Good advice. Just light a small splint and blow it out. Sniff the resulting smoke.
    >
    >
    > Lousy advice. You don't know what flavor will be imparted to the meat from that test. There may be
    > volatile flavors in the smoke which won't persist in the meat, if it's allowed to cook for a long
    > time. A much better test would be to buy some cheap meat and try smoking a batch with the wood.
    >
    >

    And don't use oleander wood. HTH :)

    Best regards, Bob
     
  9. Mark Thorson wrote:
    >
    > Lousy advice. You don't know what flavor will be imparted to the meat from that test.

    No, good advice. If you get a punget odor or turpentine odor like some softwoods, you know not to
    persue it at all. While a good smoke odor may not be good on meat, I can assure you that bad smoke
    odor will not get better. .

    --
    Ed [email protected] http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
     
  10. EskWIRED

    EskWIRED Guest

    In rec.food.cooking, Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:

    > > In rec.food.cooking, Steve Knight <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > > burn some and see if you like the smoke smell from it.
    > >
    > > Good advice. Just light a small splint and blow it out. Sniff the resulting smoke.

    > Lousy advice. You don't know what flavor will be imparted to the meat from that test.

    You do if you are an experienced cook. OTOH, you might get misled.

    HTH.

    --
    ...I'm an air-conditioned gypsy...

    - The Who
     
  11. Mark Thorson

    Mark Thorson Guest

    BOB wrote:

    > Have you actually cooked much using wood as a flavoring for the food (not just meat)?

    Yes, there was a period of a few years when I was smoking three or more times a week. The vast
    majority of that was meat, though I have done a lot of experiments with non-meat foods. Twice, I
    tried to smoke potato chips (bleah!).

    From my experience, I know that there are flavors in "fresh" smoke which disappear when the food is
    allowed to continue cooking.
     
  12. Hahabogus

    Hahabogus Guest

    "Edwin Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Mark Thorson wrote:
    >>
    >> Lousy advice. You don't know what flavor will be imparted to the meat from that test.
    >
    > No, good advice. If you get a punget odor or turpentine odor like some softwoods, you know not to
    > persue it at all. While a good smoke odor may not be good on meat, I can assure you that bad smoke
    > odor will not get better. .
    >
    >

    Or maybe like poison ivy the toxins (if any) can be carried in the smoke. If the plant is identified
    as not dangerous to people, by a respectable source... Then perhaps smoke some meat with it.

    --
    Once during Prohibition I was forced to live for days on nothing but food and water.
    --------
    FIELDS, W. C.
     
  13. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > BOB wrote:
    >
    >> Have you actually cooked much using wood as a flavoring for the food (not just meat)?
    >
    > Yes, there was a period of a few years when I was smoking three or more times a week. The vast
    > majority of that was meat, though I have done a lot of experiments with non-meat foods. Twice, I
    > tried to smoke potato chips (bleah!).
    >
    > From my experience, I know that there are flavors in "fresh" smoke which disappear when the food
    > is allowed to continue cooking.

    Then you should know more about the smells/tastes that would be transferred. Like you just said,
    tastes and smells can disappear. They will *not* just show up. So, what's the problem with making a
    smell test, specifically, why is EskWIRED's comment "Lousy advice."? Maybe it's not complete, but it
    is far from "Lousy".

    BOB cooks more with fire and smoke than with my indoor appliances
     
  14. EskWIRED

    EskWIRED Guest

    In rec.food.cooking, BOB <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Then you should know more about the smells/tastes that would be transferred.

    Exactly.

    > cooks more with fire and smoke than with my indoor appliances

    You too?

    --
    ...I'm an air-conditioned gypsy...

    - The Who
     
  15. Bob

    Bob Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > In rec.food.cooking, BOB <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Then you should know more about the smells/tastes that would be transferred.
    >
    > Exactly.
    >
    >> cooks more with fire and smoke than with my indoor appliances
    >
    > You too?
    >

    Especially me. Besides the great taste, it costs more to cool the house with the oven/stove running.

    > --
    > ...I'm an air-conditioned gypsy...
    >
    > - The Who
     
  16. Blake Murphy

    Blake Murphy Guest

    On Sun, 15 Feb 2004 21:11:14 +0000 (UTC), [email protected]
    wrote:

    >In rec.food.cooking, BOB <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Then you should know more about the smells/tastes that would be transferred.
    >
    >Exactly.
    >
    >> cooks more with fire and smoke than with my indoor appliances
    >
    >You too?

    i should definitely move in with one or both of you.

    your pal, blake
     
Loading...