Bike locks

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Wellman, Jun 30, 2003.

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  1. Wellman

    Wellman Guest

    I'm looking to buy one of those flexible locks made of wound up wires. I'd rather use the ones with
    a combination so I don't have to carry a key around but I don't know how safe they are. Are the
    combination locks good? (They're from Mountain Equipment Co-op for around $15 canadian with 4
    numbers and a resettable combination). Should I get a key one instead?

    Martin
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    >I'm looking to buy one of those flexible locks made of wound up wires. I'd rather use the ones with
    >a combination so I don't have to carry a key around but I don't know how safe they are. Are the
    >combination locks good? (They're from Mountain Equipment Co-op for around $15 canadian with 4
    >numbers and a resettable combination). Should I get a key one instead?

    All the ones I have seen are pretty flimsy and easy to open without knowing the combination. Also
    keep in mind that most of those cable locks can easily be cut with bolt cutters. They are not high
    security devices. As a friend of mine calls them "honest person theft prevention". They keep a caual
    thief from stealing your bike, but a real thief will have no problem with them.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  3. Mike Miles

    Mike Miles Guest

    --On Monday, June 30, 2003 6:10 PM -0400 Alex Rodriguez <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >> I'm looking to buy one of those flexible locks made of wound up wires. I'd rather use the ones
    >> with a combination so I don't have to carry a key around but I don't know how safe they are. Are
    >> the combination locks good? (They're from Mountain Equipment Co-op for around $15 canadian with 4
    >> numbers and a resettable combination). Should I get a key one instead?
    >
    > All the ones I have seen are pretty flimsy and easy to open without knowing the combination. Also
    > keep in mind that most of those cable locks can easily be cut with bolt cutters. They are not high
    > security devices. As a friend of mine calls them "honest person theft prevention". They keep a
    > caual thief from stealing your bike, but a real thief will have no problem with them.
    > ----------------- Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
    >
    >

    Unfortunately, this is true with most all locks. They really won't stop a dedicated thief, who
    carries 3ft bolt cutters (they've been known to even cut the bike rack to get the bike out) or
    possibly even a powersaw muffled with a towel. -Mike
     
  4. Wellman,

    When you consider that the weakest link in the setup is not the thick cable, but rather the thin
    tang that sticks into the combination part (you don't cut the cable, you cut the tang that sticks
    into combination part), perhaps you will consider a U type lock . Otherwise almost anything will do
    to keep a basically honest person honest.

    Regards, Ernie

    Wellman wrote:

    > I'm looking to buy one of those flexible locks made of wound up wires. I'd rather use the ones
    > with a combination so I don't have to carry a key around but I don't know how safe they are. Are
    > the combination locks good? (They're from Mountain Equipment Co-op for around $15 canadian with 4
    > numbers and a resettable combination). Should I get a key one instead?
    >
    > Martin
     
  5. Drifter

    Drifter Guest

    The type of lock you buy may depend on the value of the bike you ride or its appearance. Here in
    Vancouver, I have observed daily in the alley behind Granville Street groups of guys dismantling
    several bikes at a time. They do this at night, too, and take the wheels off and lock them to bike
    racks in the area with heavy chains and locks for safe storage until the pawn shops open in the
    morning. Removal one of the two wheels is a speciality because few cyclists lock up both wheels and
    frame. It is becoming common practice to use two good U-locks to secure a bike. In this drug
    infested city, any bike can fetch a dollar or two!

    Wellman wrote:
    >
    > I'm looking to buy one of those flexible locks made of wound up wires. I'd rather use the ones
    > with a combination so I don't have to carry a key around but I don't know how safe they are. Are
    > the combination locks good? (They're from Mountain Equipment Co-op for around $15 canadian with 4
    > numbers and a resettable combination). Should I get a key one instead?
    >
    > Martin
     
  6. Walter Mitty

    Walter Mitty Guest

    "Wellman" <[email protected]> brightened my day with his incisive wit when in
    news:[email protected] he conjectured that:

    > I'm looking to buy one of those flexible locks made of wound up wires. I'd rather use the ones
    > with a combination so I don't have to carry a key around but I don't know how safe they are. Are
    > the combination locks good? (They're from Mountain Equipment Co-op for around $15 canadian with 4
    > numbers and a resettable combination). Should I get a key one instead?
    >
    > Martin
    >
    >

    I'd recommend the ABUS steel-o-flex for this. While not, as other posters point out, secure against
    the determined thief they are better than most.

    http://www.abus.com/ez/EMain.htm

    I use a MillennioFlex to secure the front wheel to the frame,wrapping it tight against the frame to
    prevent cable cutters getting to it easily. For the rear wheel a good brand U-lock though the frame
    and wheel to a metal post - again as tight as possible to prevent a crowbar or hydraulic lift
    getting in there. Also, and I don't know if this does any good, I always angle the keyhole to that
    it's not easy to get at - maybe, just maybe, it might deter anyone picking the lock?

    --
    Walter Mitty.
     
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