budget up to $1500AUD, which mountain bike should I buy?

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by ahmondjai, Feb 10, 2007.

  1. ahmondjai

    ahmondjai New Member

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    Hi, everyone, I'm just a newbie into mountain bikes, and I'm looking to buy one now, set my budget up to $1500AUD, been looking at Avanti: Ridge Rider, Montari, Barracuda and for Giant: Alias, Talon. Any other good bikes(perhaps from other brands) are there for me to consider? Million thanks
     
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  2. nerdag

    nerdag New Member

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    You'll either get a sh*tload of opinons on this, or very few at all since it's asked pretty much every week.

    In summary of the "which bike should I get threads", your priorities should be:

    1) Get a bike with a frame that fits you - it's useless to you and you won't ride/enjoy riding it if it doesn't fit. If you need help with this, make sure you go to a bike shop that is willing to help you out (ie. try out bikes and/pr measure you up and make recommendations).

    2) Get a bike that suits your needs - if you're going to do some cross country, then a hard tail XC bike (like those you've listed) is a great choice. If you plan on downhilling, trials or jumps/street/urban, maybe something a bit beefier is better. Or if you are planning on some harder trail stuff, maybe an All Mountain duallie would be more suited.

    If you don't know, then a XC HT is a good starting point. That being the case, you may not want to spend too much on a bike because that you may end up selling later on if it isn't what you are after. New bikes depreciate very quickly.

    This leads well into the next point...

    3) Get a bike that you can afford - or rather, get the best bike that you can afford.

    If its a cheap(er) bike, you can always upgrade components as they wear out. This way, you'll also know which upgrades would be more beneficial for your riding style and needs, which will likely save you a little bit of money in the long run.

    As a starter, you're probably not going to notice a whole lot of difference between a $3000 or a $900 hardtail (I cite this example since the you've listed the hardtails above), and the dosh you save on buying a less costly bike can always be put to better components as you wear out the existing ones, or you can save it up for other things (like your rent/mortgage repayments - if you have them - to name but one example).

    8 speed vs 9 speed isn't all that important, and until you really get into it, you'll probably not notice, let alone or care for, the difference between an alivio drive train vs. deore vs. XT vs. SRAM. In practical terms, the differences aren't all that significant.

    The arguments about more expensive parts being more durable than cheaper ones carries some weight, but the differences in usable life are hard to quantify in terms of cost in dollars, aprticularly if you're not going to be putting the frame/parts through the pounding of a life or abuse (at least not just yet).

    Having said that, if you've got the money and have nothing else to spend it on, then by all means go out and buy the best bike you can afford to. With a $1500 budget, you'll be able to get a pretty good recreational MTB, and some will argue that something like the Barracuda could be used for racing (it's certainly no featherweight by racing standards, but then you're also saving a few grand over the top of the line carbon frame with full XTR).

    Second hand is only an option if you know what you're looking for - as a new face to the sport, that's probably not going to be practical, and the extra money you'll spend on a bike shop is a good investment for the expertise.

    4) Get a bike that you like the look of - Some people don't regard this as important, but if it looks good, you're probably going to want to use it more often. There's little point in buying an ugly bike that you hate riding.

    Mind you, this should be the lowest of your priorities.


    HTH,

    n
     
  3. ahmondjai

    ahmondjai New Member

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    Wow, that's a very detail reply with lots of informations and opinions which are pointing me to the right directions I guess.

    I've had a look at the bikes in the shops, while one tried to sell me the Talon, and the others are trying to sell Montari and Ridge Rider, which is getting me all confused. I understand perhaps this might sound silly, but if you compare these bikes together by looking at the specs, which of them is more a bargin to go for? assuming that you have a different bike. And what is there for me to looking at while purchasing a new bike? I can only compare the component series from shimano and sram, like which one is higher up. I know it might be annoying asking someone else to go thur all the complications, but thanks in advance anyway~~:p


     
  4. nerdag

    nerdag New Member

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    It's a common question - refer to my answer above. In this price range, the differences in quality aren't so huge that it pays to get what fits and suits, and get what you can afford.

    I'm not familiar with the componentry on each bike. In any case, bikes are for riding, not investing, so the "savings" that you might get with getting better components aren't likely to be significant, at least not in this price range.

    The most important difference might be 9sp vs. 8 sp, but even then, that's not really a big deal for a recreational rider, let alone a new buyer.

    In my opinion, the most important components on hard tail are (in order of importance): frame, fork/wheels (of equal importance, IMHO), shifters, brakes, crankset/BB, derailleurs.

    Others may disagree.

    Don't be fooled into thinking that a higher spec rear derailleur makes your bike a whole lot better - manufacturers like to stick RDs that are one group higher up than the rest of the drivetrain, simply because its cheap, and they can talk it up as being a better bike. The reality is that it might save 15-20g or so over a bike that weighs 13-14kg (not to mention a rider that is between 50-150kg!) - not a big deal, and nothing to get excited about. The shifting quality comes from the shifters, not the RD.

    So it pays to get the frame right first time - everything else you can upgrade once you wear it out.

    HTH,

    n
     
  5. Archibald

    Archibald New Member

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    if you're looking for the most "bang for your buck", consider looking at last year's models as they'll all be reduced to clear so the shops can stock this year's models.
    it's how i got a $2,200 XC HT for $1,350...
     
  6. MattyP

    MattyP New Member

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    I'm in a similar process at the moment, although my budget is $2k for a new HT to be used on weekends. Giving serious consideration to the Jamis Dragon Comp at present.

    As has been suggested, look for the best you can get for the money you want to spend, that meets your needs.

    I've found in looking in my price bracket & needs, I've found some 2006 models being sold quite cheap (eg 2006 Avanti Aggressor for $1749 down from $2399).

    I've also found some 2007 models already discounted, which allows me to make some upgrades & still stay within budget.

    I had suggested to me by shop staff on the weekend to consider the model up from the bike I'm interested in, to which I replied "if you provide the extra $1.5k to pay the difference". There's usually a reason you have a budget, sometimes shop people need to understand that.

    Happy shopping.

    Matt
     
  7. ahmondjai

    ahmondjai New Member

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    alright, thanks for all of those opinions, I went to a shop yesterday, with scott bikes, the sales was telling me the same things, so, how do you compare the frames for scott, avanti and giant?they are all within my budget~~~~

    looks like I'm getting my bike soon, and I'll be joinning the force of mountain biking~~~~


     
  8. ahmondjai

    ahmondjai New Member

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    most shops I went to, most of their sale stocks are all gone, which one have you got and from where, mind telling?? so that, I can have a look over there??

     
  9. Proteus2000

    Proteus2000 New Member

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    I am currently borrowing a ex girl friends hybrid bike.
    Looking for a new bicycle. Specs .in order of importance
    Price : $900-1300
    Gears : 24+ (Shimano Deore or better)
    Type : Light Hybrid or Road. i.e 700cc Wheels
    Weight : Lighter the better. (9 - 13kg)
    Forks : Lockable Suspension or Raked[Curved] (NOT Straight Forks too hard on hands)
    Wheels : Marvic or equivalent
    Brakes : are disc brakes better than Rim Brakes??

    Use on road and Melbourne bicycle paths (up to 100 Km rides).
    Why do I hate straight forks without Suspension. Do not like moving from
    Foot paths to roads. Jars the hands too much.

    Some Brand/Models I have been looking at
    Giant -- Perigee ~$1200 (No disc Brakes)
    Giant -- Talon ~$1245 (with Disc Brakes)


    Have about 3 weeks to look around Test and evaluate

    Does anybody Newsagent or Person have a copy of Bicycle Australia's 2006 Buyers guide. Is this worth getting a copy of. Have been looking for one.
    But Mooney Ponds newsagent sold last copy a couple of weeks ago


    Thanks for any help in advance

    Cheers James P.
     
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