Camino de Santiago

Discussion in 'Clydesdales 200lb / 90kg + riders' started by KitCougar, Apr 27, 2012.

  1. KitCougar

    KitCougar New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2012
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm thinking of riding the Camino de Santiago next season. Has anyone out there done it? It's roughly five-hundred miles through Spain including two mountain crossings and some rough terrain. I'm currently 293lbs though I've got a pretty big frame at 6'4". So I'm looking for any tips and advice I can get on all points here. Anything?
     
    Tags:


  2. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2004
    Messages:
    16,131
    Likes Received:
    115
    I've walked/run sections of the Camino Frances (there are 4 other camino/routes to Santiago).

    The climbs are not particularly steep and if you get good weather the Camino is an absolute pleasure to do, on the Camino Frances.

    A factor will be the time you need to complete the route.
     
  3. KitCougar

    KitCougar New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2012
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0
    Awesome! Thanks for the input! I was looking at taking the way of St. James but I assume it's similar. I expect I can finish in two and a half weeks with an extra week as a safety net (I'm a full time student and racking up debt anyway) and to revisit some places from my childhood. Does that amount of time sound reasonable to you?
     
  4. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2004
    Messages:
    16,131
    Likes Received:
    115
    You'll be fine given that time frame. I started the route from St Jean Pied de Port.
    I found that the route includes short but very steep climbs and long gradual climbs.
    The short step climbs are 300 metres to 1 kilometre on average with the longer gradual climbs being 1 to 5 kilometres in length.
    The short sharp climbs are more difficult I find.
     
  5. KitCougar

    KitCougar New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2012
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0
    Fantastic. Thank you so much for your advice, I look forward to my trip!
     
  6. Lifsrof

    Lifsrof New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    So did you have a chance to complete the Camino? We are planning on renting a couple of hybrid Canondales in late October in St Jean. I hope to complete the trip in less then two weeks. We also want to try out the great Spanish wines along they way through Navarra, Rioja, and Rias Baixas. Any advice on other "must dos" during this historic trek?
     
  7. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2004
    Messages:
    16,131
    Likes Received:
    115
    Weather in that part of the world can be changeable at this time of the year.
    The Bay of Biscay dominates the weather in that part of France and Spain so the weather can be unpredictable. I would suggest bringing plenty of rain gear with you just in case.
    Wind and rain can be a factor if the weather turns bad in that neck of the woods.

    Two weeks should be ample time to complete the Camino by bike.
    Are you staying in traditional accommodation or are you staying in hotels/hostels close to the route?
    Navarra is great city to go to explore. The old town is lovely but it get very quiet at night time. If you are staying in Navarra stay in the modern part because it's busier and more lively.

    Burgos and Leon are the other two major cities that you will pass through if you take the Camino Frances route : again like Navarra the same thing applies to both cities.
     
  8. doctorold

    doctorold Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2010
    Messages:
    345
    Likes Received:
    8
    I just walked the Camino and frankly, it's not something I would want to do on a bike. Too many rocky, craggy paths and climbs. You have to take a number of road detours to do it IMO. It's pretty country, very old world but there are better rides. Walking the camino affords you so much more enjoyment of that path. Before I walked I thought it might something I would want to do on bike but once I got there and walked many KM I concluded it was not something I wanted to do. But, it's only my opinion. Good luck.

    On a side note, after walking the camino I lost enough weight that I am no longer a clydesdale. Guess I can't post here anymore.
     
  9. doctorold

    doctorold Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2010
    Messages:
    345
    Likes Received:
    8
    I thought of another reason to walk. Meeting the people. You will meet many more people walking than if you are passing them by. Meeting people from all over the world was one of the greatest pleasures on our adventure on the Camino.
     
  10. Lifsrof

    Lifsrof New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the great info limrickman and doctorold. I would have preferred walking the path during a warmer time of the year. But this is the only time I could get off work. I hope it turns out well. Either way - it sounds like quite an experience/adventure!
    Thanks again. I'll post some results of the trip when we return.
     
Loading...
Loading...