Clear Channel

Discussion in 'rec.bicycles.soc archive' started by Burr, Oct 6, 2003.

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  1. Burr

    Burr Guest

    Any body heard any more about this mess??? Any body getting any replies this time?

    Burr
     
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  2. Burr <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Any body heard any more about this mess??? Any body getting any replies this time?

    I've been in frequent communication with the local (WDCG) station manager because the station
    selected me for communication with the local cycling community. However, few other people are
    getting any response, because the station management is getting so many emails and so many voice
    mails that they cannot possibly read or pay attention to them all. Last I heard, their email
    accounts and voice mail systems have become practically useless for the time being.

    I suggest that if you want serious attention to an inquiry or comment, you should send a
    professional-looking and polite postal mail letter to the station or Clear Channel management. This
    is more likely to get read and get attention, because it is clearer that the writer is a real
    person and not a virtual identity on the Internet. Also, it doesn't create a denial-of-service
    effect on their electronic communications system (which if that is the intent of mass emailings, is
    probably illegal.)

    Steve Goodridge http://www.humantransport.org/bicycledriving/wdcg.htm
     
  3. Karen M.

    Karen M. Guest

    Burr wrote:
    > Any body heard any more about this mess??? Any body getting any replies this time?

    Just this, circulated on CrankMail (Cleveland). It's from the LA (and I don't mean the TdF winner)
    Times. --Karen M.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~` Mikes vs. bikes

    Cyclists fail to see humor in DJs' calls for assaults.

    By J. Michael Kennedy, Times Staff Writer

    Kevin Bray was, well, shocked, when he heard that shock jocks were urging their listeners to run
    bicyclists off the road. He was horrified when he found out it had happened at least three times
    since July, in each case at stations owned by radio behemoth Clear Channel — first in
    Cleveland, then Houston and finally at a station in Raleigh, N.C. To Bray, an avid cyclist and
    veteran North Carolina highway patrolman, there seemed to be an ominous pattern developing.

    "All I can say is, 'Who's next?' " said Bray, who has filed a complaint against the Raleigh station
    with the Federal Communications Commission. "What these people are doing is some sort of sick
    marketing ploy."

    That thought has also occurred to Patrick McCormick, director of communications for the
    40,000-member League of American Bicyclists, an organization dedicated to preserving cyclists'
    rights. He said his group has been deluged with complaints now that three major radio markets have
    been beset by the same anticyclist comments. "We're still contemplating what we're going to do as a
    national organization," McCormick said.

    The incidents have stirred rage in the cycling world. In each incident, disc jockeys derided
    cyclists and encouraged listeners to run them down. In the latest example, at Raleigh station
    WDCG-FM, disc jockeys Bob Dumas and Madison Lane began their rant against cyclists on Sept. 22. In
    the course of the program, listeners flooded their telephone lines to vent about cyclists, including
    one woman who boasted that her father intentionally hit one while they were on the way to church.
    One of the DJs promoted the joys of hitting cyclists with Yoohoo bottles.

    When patrolman Bray heard about the program, he wrote an e-mail to the shock jocks, warning them
    they were instructing the motoring public in how to commit assault with a deadly weapon - their
    cars. Bray also informed them that he was reporting them to the FCC.

    "I don't know much about radio broadcasting," he wrote. "But I have enough sense to know that these
    acts are either illegal or contrary to the code of ethics you should be bound by when the FCC allows
    you to go on the air."

    The station's initial response came from station manager Kenneth Spitzer, who referred to the show
    as "animated banter." But after a demonstration outside the station and the threat by advertisers to
    pull out, Spitzer issued a public apology on the air Thursday.

    The first of the anticyclist diatribe occurred last July in Cleveland, when WMJI-FM disc jockeys
    suggested cyclists be rammed off the road. One of those who got on the phone to defend cyclists was
    Lois Cowan, who co-owns four bike shops in the Cleveland area.

    "I was repeatedly called a buffoon, an idiot and a PMS sufferer who couldn't take a joke," she said.
    "Then there were three hours of calls from people saying, 'Yeah, you guys are right.' "

    The session left Cowan in tears, but she immediately swung into action, helping engineer a
    bombardment of calls and e-mails to the station. In the end, the station called a truce and agreed
    to, among other things, hundreds of public-service announcements about the need to share the road.

    The Houston incident also took place in September, and the timing of the show infuriated the city's
    cycling community. On Aug. 30, a woman driving a pickup truck had lost control and slammed into a
    20-bike pace line, killing two riders and injuring eight others. Three days later, the disc jockeys
    at station KLOL-FM went on their antibiking rampage, setting off another round of protests.

    "When you incite people to violence, you've crossed the line," insisted Houston cyclist Frank
    Karbarz, who helped organize against the station. "They did it almost like a tutorial. It wasn't
    humorous. It was how to hurt someone."

    Cowan doesn't believe that Clear Channel, which owns more than 1,200 radio stations in the U.S., is
    encouraging the anticycling venom. She said it's more probable that word spread among disc jockeys
    that knocking cyclists is sure to push emotional buttons with their listeners.

    Clear Channel, for its part, said through a spokesperson that each station was "operated and
    produced independently," and "each station is working to correct the problem in their city."

    But noted cycling writer Ed Pavelka said he felt the three incidents have at least the makings of a
    trend. "First it was Cleveland, then Houston and Raleigh," he said. "Either someone's not getting
    the message, or someone's doing it with intent."

    In 2001, 728 cyclists were killed in accidents involving motor vehicles in the United States. And an
    additional 45,000 cyclists were injured.

    Legally, cyclists are afforded the same rights as motorists. Lawyer Gary Brustin, who specializes in
    cycling cases, noted that some motorists just don't like sharing the road with bikes. "They just
    don't like them."

    http://www.latimes.com/features/outdoors/la-os-bike7oct07,1,7316055.story?coll=la-headlines-outdoors

    OR

    http://tinyurl.com/q2jk
     
  4. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Burr <[email protected]> writes:
    > Your post makes it sound like we are wrong to complain, that we are the bad ones!!

    Really? I just "got" that mass electronic communications tend to backlog and are readily deletable,
    and therefore can get missed; traditional post can circumvent those problems, and perhaps better
    ensure that your complaints get noticed.

    In other words, I think Steven was trying to help folks to get their message across.

    The price of a postage stamp is no great strain.

    And if the Truth may be invoked, email *is* eminently more ignorable than snail mail.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  5. Burr

    Burr Guest

    I wrote the LA Times last asking them to do a story!!!! I also wrote the WSJ and asked for
    their help!!!

    Maybe I'll send the LA story to the WSJ to push a little.

    Burr
     
  6. Burr

    Burr Guest

    Steven, I was not trying to jam their email account or spam or jam their VM. The first time I wrote
    about the first two deals I did get nice replies back that I posted here. This time I have not heard
    a work and YES I also filed a complaint with the FCC, wrote the local LA Times and the WSJ asking
    for their help and I think I got some and I am going after the WSJ again, I have paid my money for
    years and I hope they will help. Your post makes it sound like we are wrong to complain, that we are
    the bad ones!! If I had my way they would be shut down for six months this time and for ever the
    next time and I hope it does hurt their stock. I had a guy jam me to the edge of the road Sunday
    while I was riding, he missed my handle bars by a foot and was going maybe 40 mph or better. The
    local police here in California do a good job of "trying" to help cyclist if they see someone
    messing with us but they don't see much.

    Burr

    Steven Goodridge wrote:

    > Burr <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >>Any body heard any more about this mess??? Any body getting any replies this time?
    >>
    >
    > I've been in frequent communication with the local (WDCG) station manager because the station
    > selected me for communication with the local cycling community. However, few other people are
    > getting any response, because the station management is getting so many emails and so many voice
    > mails that they cannot possibly read or pay attention to them all. Last I heard, their email
    > accounts and voice mail systems have become practically useless for the time being.
    >
    > I suggest that if you want serious attention to an inquiry or comment, you should send a
    > professional-looking and polite postal mail letter to the station or Clear Channel management.
    > This is more likely to get read and get attention, because it is clearer that the writer is a real
    > person and not a virtual identity on the Internet. Also, it doesn't create a denial-of-service
    > effect on their electronic communications system (which if that is the intent of mass emailings,
    > is probably illegal.)
    >
    > Steve Goodridge http://www.humantransport.org/bicycledriving/wdcg.htm
     
  7. [email protected] (Tom Keats) wrote:
    > In other words, I think Steven was trying to help folks to get their message across.
    >
    > The price of a postage stamp is no great strain.
    >
    > And if the Truth may be invoked, email *is* eminently more ignorable than snail mail.

    Yes, postal mail on paper is more likely to be viewed as authentic, and requires a more physical act
    to read and respond. People who write postal mail also tend to organize their thoughts better, and
    tend to be more polite.

    WDCG's management says that they are getting a lot of very nasty, threatening emails and voice
    messages. I don't think these help; and at this point the station is virtually ignoring their email
    and voice mail. I imagine that most people will want to contact higher-ups at Clear Channel or the
    FCC anyway, if their intent is (a) to prevent this in other areas of the country, or (b) to obtain
    greater gains in terms of public education.

    Steve Goodridge
     
  8. Karen M.

    Karen M. Guest

    Controversy to be covered by Good Morning America Weds Oct 15.

    --Karen M.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    > One for the good guys From: "Lois Cowan" <[email protected]> Date: Thu, 9 Oct 2003 15:31:01
    > -0700 To: <[email protected]>
    >
    >
    > Score one more for the good guys!!
    >
    > You may have been following the Clear Channel Radio versus bicycles controversy. Many of you have
    > been instrumental in the fight by writing, calling and e-mailing management and their advertisers.
    > Thank you for your efforts and your help.
    >
    > This afternoon, Good Morning America taped an interview from Century Cycles' Solon store regarding
    > the issue. Unless a big story breaks, the segment is due to air Wednesday, October 15.
    >
    > It's a great opportunity to do some public education. Who knows how my comments will be editted,
    > but cross your fingers that the piece helps get the message out to Share the Roads!
     
  9. Burr

    Burr Guest

    THANKS

    Burr Diamondback Road Bike REI Touring Bike Schwinn City Bike So. California Deserts

    Thomas Reynolds wrote:
    > Burr <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >>Any body heard any more about this mess??? Any body getting any replies this time?
    >>
    >>Burr
    >
    > Not a direct answer to your question but Velonews had an interesting article about the legal
    > issues of this:
    >
    > http://velonews.gadoz.com/news/fea/5058.0.html
    >
    > Tom
     
  10. Jym Dyer

    Jym Dyer Guest

    =v= I'm on a bunch of Critical Mass email lists and I see this popping up here and there, all over
    the U.S. I think there are three dynamics at work here:

    (1) Drive-time radio basically tries to pander to its presumed audience, motorists who don't care
    about anything but getting somewhere fast. This stuff is in the same vein as the mindless
    drive-time blowhard rants about emissions controls, gas prices, tolls, and highway
    construction.

    (2) Ratings-seeking "shock jocks" whose idea of cutting- edge humor is attacking women and
    minorities, seeing bicyclists as yet another "other" to say moronic things about.

    (3) ClearChannel works to make the airwaves homogenous. If their idiot deejays screw up in one
    market, they can just move to another locale. As some of this is programmed centrally, they
    may not even need to move.

    <_Jym_
     
  11. Adrian Hands

    Adrian Hands Guest

    Excellent!

    The Bay area paper, "Contra Costa Times", has reprinted the "LA Times" article too in today's (Oct
    13) edition.

    Cyclists ride stations for dumb stunts http://www.bayarea.com/mld/cctimes/7002072.htm

    Here in Raleigh NC we've had reports of authentic cycling-oriented
    PSAs airing on a couple of other clear channel stations.

    Here's some local press reaction: http://www.newsobserver.com/news/story/2934840p-2693054c.html

    I've got some problem with referring to it as a "controversy" - I don't see what's "controversial"
    about it - inciting random potentially-lethal violence on unsuspecting road travelers is wrong and
    illegal. A broadcast radio professional engaging in such activity is inexcusable.

    [email protected] (Karen M.) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > Controversy to be covered by Good Morning America Weds Oct 15.
     
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