Clothing

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Oughtfour, Oct 16, 2003.

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  1. Oughtfour

    Oughtfour Guest

    I've been riding for years, but it was only a year ago that I got with the program and bought padded
    shorts, a wicking jersey, and nice stiff bike shoes.

    This is such a dramatic improvement over tee shirts and running shoes that I am wondering what else
    I am missing.

    What other articles of clothing do people recommend, especially in the cooler weather? And in
    extreme weather--cold, very hot, wet?
     
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  2. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I've been riding for years, but it was only a year ago that I got with the program and bought
    > padded shorts, a wicking jersey, and nice stiff bike shoes.
    >
    > This is such a dramatic improvement over tee shirts and running shoes that I am wondering what
    > else I am missing.

    Not much; those are the main ones IMO. Do you have padded gloves? Some people (me, for one)
    find a big difference in comfort when using them over non-padded or no gloves. Not true for
    everyone, though.

    WRT the shoes, I found that pretty much any stiff-soled sneaker-style shoes work fine; I use a pair
    of cross-trainers. Stiffness is the key.

    > What other articles of clothing do people recommend, especially in the cooler weather? And in
    > extreme weather--cold, very hot, wet?

    For cooler weather, I like a long wicking material like UnderArmor Cold Gear. For really cold, you
    want wind-blocking as well.

    I don't ride when it's really wet any more, so I can't weigh in on that subject.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  3. Pat

    Pat Guest

    "OughtFour" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:bmm6sc$qqc[email protected]...
    > I've been riding for years, but it was only a year ago that I got with the program and bought
    > padded shorts, a wicking jersey, and nice stiff bike shoes.
    >
    > This is such a dramatic improvement over tee shirts and running shoes that
    I
    > am wondering what else I am missing.
    >
    > What other articles of clothing do people recommend, especially in the cooler weather? And in
    > extreme weather--cold, very hot, wet?

    You should get those fingerless gloves with the pads on the palms for general riding. In the winter,
    I go to the Army/Navy store and buy silk glove liners for $4 apiece and wear those under the bicycle
    gloves. They keep my fingers warm while keeping the tactile stimulation I prefer. One pair will last
    the entire winter. In fact, mine would have lasted longer, but I snagged them on something and
    ripped a piece out.

    What bothers me? My fingers, toes, ears, and nose. You can slip a plastic baggie over your socks
    before you put your feet in the shoes, and that will help with the cold toes. Some people wear
    balaclavas to protect the nose. I wear a polypropylene hat and pull it down over my ears . The thin
    polypropylene keeps the cold air from the helmet vents from freezing your head, and it also
    protects the ears without rendering you deaf.

    Pat in TX
     
  4. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "OughtFour" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > I've been riding for years, but it was only a year ago that I got with the program and bought
    > padded shorts, a wicking jersey, and nice stiff bike shoes.
    >
    > This is such a dramatic improvement over tee shirts and running shoes that I am wondering what
    > else I am missing.
    >
    > What other articles of clothing do people recommend, especially in the cooler weather? And in
    > extreme weather--cold, very hot, wet?

    For very cold -- windfront tights. I have some Bellwether ones. They really do the job down into the
    teens F, and probably colder.

    Vests are handy too. They keep most of the wind off, while breathing better than a full
    windbreaker. Windfront jerseys are really nice, but hard to find and very expensive, and a vest
    works just as well.

    Matt O.
     
  5. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Pat" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > You should get those fingerless gloves with the pads on the palms for general riding. In the
    > winter, I go to the Army/Navy store and buy silk glove liners for $4 apiece and wear those under
    > the bicycle gloves. They keep my fingers warm while keeping the tactile stimulation I prefer. One
    > pair will last the entire winter. In fact, mine would have lasted longer, but I snagged them on
    > something and ripped a piece out.

    That'll work, but for me the biggest problem is keeping the wind off. I

    I have some Pearl Izumi gloves that are semi-windproof, and good down to just below freezing.
    They're like "spring skiing" gloves. They get a lot of use -- for biking, skiing, and all
    around cold weather wear. I got them for Xmas 7-8 years ago. And despite all that use, they
    still look great.

    Matt O.
     
  6. Doug Purdy

    Doug Purdy Guest

    "OughtFour" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I've been riding for years, but it was only a year ago that I got with the program and bought
    > padded shorts, a wicking jersey, and nice stiff bike shoes.
    >
    > This is such a dramatic improvement over tee shirts and running shoes that
    I
    > am wondering what else I am missing.
    >
    > What other articles of clothing do people recommend, especially in the cooler weather? And in
    > extreme weather--cold, very hot, wet?

    The technical fabrics and made for biking clothes do make things a LOT more comfy for me too. But as
    you know it's all quite possible to do with ordinary clothes and for a lot less money.

    It looks like you are from southern California? If so I'm not sure what you mean by
    extreme cold/hot.

    Above 50F/10C you might consider arm &/or leg warmers. They are easy to remove on days when it will
    warm up. At 50F/10C a long sleeve jersey and vest can be nice, especially at the start, and the vest
    is easy to stuff in a jersey pocket when it warms up. Light tights are good to add here too.

    As the temperature goes lower you can switch to winter jersey, tights and wind jacket. Light booties
    or toe warmers and winter bike gloves help.

    At freezing you would probably want to add some light underwear made for high energy activity.
    Underwear comes in 3 weights and you can layer the weights too. If you haven't already you would
    switch to windblocking tights. You probably need warmer gloves or mitts and warmer booties around
    this point. Ear muffs, ear bags, helmet ear patches are some ways to keep your ears from freezing.

    As it gets colder you add more under layers. You need warmer mitts & booties, maybe multiples of
    both. When it gets very cold around here -10F/-20C with high winds you might want a neoprene face
    mask and a thin hat under your helmet.

    Some notes.

    For riding wind blocking means only on the front of vests, jackets, tights, jerseys and underwear.
    Bike shorts have pads and thus are always wind blocking.

    Some of your top layers need to fit well around the neck but sometimes with all layers tight around
    the neck I can feel a bit strangled.

    I'll leave warm to you.

    Doug Toronto
     
  7. Mark

    Mark Guest

    "OughtFour" wrote
    > I've been riding for years, but it was only a year ago that I got with the program and bought
    > padded shorts, a wicking jersey, and nice stiff bike shoes.
    >
    > This is such a dramatic improvement over tee shirts and running shoes that
    I
    > am wondering what else I am missing.
    >
    > What other articles of clothing do people recommend, especially in the cooler weather? And in
    > extreme weather--cold, very hot, wet?
    >
    >

    Cycling gloves are nice, they cushion your hands on long rides, like a lot of people have mentioned.
    The 1/2 finger jobs are good for mild weather, there are full finger models for cool weather, and
    Pearl Izumi makes a really neat glove called the "Lobster Claw" (2 fingers & thumb) for really cold
    weather. Thin glove liners (silk, polypro, Thermax, Capilene) will extend the temperature range of
    any of these.

    A few companies (Ibex, Rivendell) are bringing back high quality wool cycling clothing. They don't
    absorb body odors like the synthetics, and keep you comfortable over a wider range of temperatures
    than synthetics, but they are pricey, harder to care for (take longer to dry) and smell like a wet
    sheep when wet.

    For cold weather, Pearl Izumi and a few other people make thin skull caps that fit under a bicycle
    helmet, which goes a long way in retaining body heat.

    --
    mark
     
  8. mark <[email protected]> wrote:
    : A few companies (Ibex, Rivendell) are bringing back high quality wool cycling clothing.

    see also

    http://www.vintagevelos.com/clothing1.html http://www.vintagevelos.com/jer-acido1.html
    http://www.vintagevelos.com/jer-veloce1.html

    swobo. sniffle, sniffle. geez, they were almost indestructible. i've got a couple of never worn
    black long sleeves xl jerseys if anyone wants to make me an offer (i'm a large now).

    : you comfortable over a wider range of temperatures than synthetics, but they are pricey, harder to
    : care for (take longer to dry) and smell like a wet sheep when wet.

    hmm. i like that smell. the best advantage of wool is that you, errr, ummm .. don't have to wash it
    very much. i go almost a whole week with one jersey commuting (i'm "evaluating" the acido right now
    -- so far so good).

    it sounds a lot grosser than it is. honest.

    nothing beats it in the cold. & 'specially in the cold when wet. and they aren't bad in the heat,
    either. i've used the same jersey from 45 (w/ arm warmers) to 104 (umm, without). great for touring
    (never wash).
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  9. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Doug Purdy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:GHDjb.142260$ko%[email protected]...

    > It looks like you are from southern California? If so I'm not sure what you mean by extreme
    > cold/hot.

    There are mountains and deserts in southern CA, where in winter it regularly goes below 10F at
    night, and sometimes below 0F. And of course, extreme heat (90F+) is commonplace, anywhere more than
    a few miles from the ocean.

    CA is definately a land of extremes! That's what makes it so interesting... you can ski and surf on
    the same day!

    Matt O.
     
  10. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "David Reuteler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > mark <[email protected]> wrote:

    > : A few companies (Ibex, Rivendell) are bringing back high quality wool cycling clothing.
    >
    > see also
    >
    > http://www.vintagevelos.com/clothing1.html http://www.vintagevelos.com/jer-acido1.html
    > http://www.vintagevelos.com/jer-veloce1.html
    >
    > swobo. sniffle, sniffle. geez, they were almost indestructible. i've got a couple of never worn
    > black long sleeves xl jerseys if anyone wants to make me an offer (i'm a large now).

    Also try www.boure.com

    Matt O.
     
  11. Pat

    Pat Guest

    > hmm. i like that smell. the best advantage of wool is that you, errr, ummm .. don't have to wash
    > it very much. i go almost a whole week with one jersey commuting (i'm "evaluating" the acido right
    > now -- so far so good).
    >
    > it sounds a lot grosser than it is. honest.
    >
    > nothing beats it in the cold. & 'specially in the cold when wet. and
    they
    > aren't bad in the heat, either. i've used the same jersey from 45 (w/ arm warmers) to 104 (umm,
    > without). great for touring (never wash).
    > --
    > david reuteler

    Tour alone a lot, do you?

    pat in TX
     
  12. Pat

    Pat Guest

    > I have some Pearl Izumi gloves that are semi-windproof, and good down to
    just
    > below freezing. They're like "spring skiing" gloves. They get a lot of
    use --
    > for biking, skiing, and all around cold weather wear. I got them for Xmas
    7-8
    > years ago. And despite all that use, they still look great.
    >
    > Matt O.

    Do you ever use knee warmers? I have some leg warmers, but I am wondering about just using knee
    warmers. I can't bring myself to buy knickers. If so, which brand?

    Pat in TX
     
  13. Pat <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Tour alone a lot, do you?

    that was mean.

    ...

    but .. err, yea, mostly. i also subsist almost entirely on bean burritos.
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  14. Oughtfour

    Oughtfour Guest

    > Doug Toronto

    (and everyone else)

    Thanks, Doug, and everyone for your thoughts.

    I'm in New England, not So.Cal., but the temperature ranges you described are about what I was
    wondering about.

    Thanks again!
     
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