DeathRide registration process changed

Discussion in 'rec.bicycles.rides archive' started by Mike Jacoubowsk, Jan 23, 2003.

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  1. We maintain a mailing list for getting out info on the Markleeville DeathRide, and have now posted a
    page detailing the experiences people have had trying to register for this year's event, as well as
    a major change in the process just announced today.

    http://www.ChainReaction.com/deathrideregstories.htm

    Please note that we're not affiliated with the DeathRide itself, or the organization running it.
    However, we have a *lot* of customers who are interested in it, so we try to get whatever info we
    can for them.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
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  2. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    I'm tired of being treated badly by Death Ride. I did it every year since '94 but missed out in
    2002. This year they required me to be sitting in front of a fast computer at 10a on a Wed to
    register. Now I'm invited to a lottery where I have no idea if I can share expenses with friends or
    have to go alone. I wonder how many reserved spots they have for the hotel keepers in the Chamber of
    Commerce this year?

    It's a business and I'm being processed. Who needs it?

    On Fri, 24 Jan 2003 04:52:17 GMT, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >We maintain a mailing list for getting out info on the Markleeville DeathRide, and have now posted
    >a page detailing the experiences people have had trying to register for this year's event, as well
    >as a major change in the process just announced today.
    >
    >http://www.ChainReaction.com/deathrideregstories.htm
    >
    >Please note that we're not affiliated with the DeathRide itself, or the organization running it.
    >However, we have a *lot* of customers who are interested in it, so we try to get whatever info we
    >can for them.
    >
    >--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  3. > I'm tired of being treated badly by Death Ride. I did it every year since '94 but missed out in
    > 2002. This year they required me to be sitting in front of a fast computer at 10a on a Wed to
    > register. Now I'm invited to a lottery where I have no idea if I can share expenses with friends
    > or have to go alone. I wonder how many reserved spots they have for the hotel keepers in the
    > Chamber of Commerce this year?
    >
    > It's a business and I'm being processed. Who needs it?I

    It's got to be a tough one for the organizers. No matter what, you can't get around the fact that
    far more people want to ride the event than will be able to. So do you price the event to demand,
    continuing to raise the fee until supply of spaces=number of riders willing to pay the price? If it
    were being run as many businesses, that would be how the price was determined. So obviously they're
    not charging all that the traffic will bear, and thus are doing a service for those who couldn't
    afford to ride if it were done otherwise.

    In your case, you've made it a regular part of your cycling life, and look forward to it every year.
    But what about the person who's been trying to ride it for some time, but has even less chance to
    get in because those who have ridden it at least once in the past three years have a much better
    shot at a ride (because they give past riders preferential treatment)? Isn't there something to be
    said for spreading the DeathRide experience to as many people as possible?

    No easy solutions. Regarding the hotel keepers, it does make some sense to have assurances that
    available rooms will be made available to those who are actually riding. And it is, of course, a
    Chamber of Commerce event, done primarily for the tourism industry of Alpine County. The fact that
    it's a cycling event is incidental. It's all about bringing in bodies and money. And there's nothing
    really wrong with that, either.

    There surely must be other models of events like this; expeditions so special to many that far more
    people want to enter than can be allowed to. How have they been handled? Any examples that most
    people would agree to be more fair? But ultimately, if something more fair is found, my guess is it
    will be something where the definition of "fair" is determined by *everyone* feeling cheated, not
    just people in certain categories.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  4. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    The point is that in 2002 there were riders who were not part of the lottery that got to ride
    because they were staying at certain establishments. I personally had that fact confirmed by the
    Death Ride office after being told the same at Davis 200.

    On Fri, 24 Jan 2003 07:04:11 GMT, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >No easy solutions. Regarding the hotel keepers, it does make some sense to have assurances that
    >available rooms will be made available to those who are actually riding.
     
  5. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    I agree that fair is only a goal and may not be a practicality.

    Do you really believe that there is any fairness in demanding that a rider access to a computer at
    10a on a weekday? Out of 5 of my regular group, two don't even know how to use a computer. I have
    several computers and had to be away at 10a.

    Fair is permitting those that apply and are not selected by lottery be permitted priority the
    following year. That registration not be transferable and ID be required at registration. I wouldn't
    like this but I'd consider it fair.

    Less fair, but more challenging, is to permit people that complete 5 passes be given priority the
    following year. I'd like this but it is unfair to majority of current riders.

    Fair would be a high fee to enter that can be raised to benefit a charity. As example, a pledge of
    $2500 min. in charitable contributions, due by May 15, to support a rider. I wouldn't like this but
    it would be a good thing to do.

    Totally fair and rational is that if I don't like the rules I don't have to play. I want more than
    being a name in a lottery. I can ride there alone or with my friends anytime I like.

    I consider myself fortunate in that I can talk about the 6 pass pin I have, freezing, being blown
    over at the Ebbets summit rest area, roasting on the way to Carson, seeing mounds of snow in July,
    eating gel packetts 6 at a time, and blowing out a rear tire going outbound and downhill on Monitor
    and stupidly using the Powerbar wrapper boot 'til getting back to my car after Ebbets.

    On Fri, 24 Jan 2003 07:04:11 GMT, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >There surely must be other models of events like this; expeditions so special to many that far more
    >people want to enter than can be allowed to. How have they been handled? Any examples that most
    >people would agree to be more fair? But ultimately, if something more fair is found, my guess is it
    >will be something where the definition of "fair" is determined by *everyone* feeling cheated, not
    >just people in certain categories.
    >
    >--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  6. Paul Kopit <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm tired of being treated badly by Death Ride. I did it every year since '94 but missed out in
    > 2002. This year they required me to be sitting in front of a fast computer at 10a on a Wed to
    > register. Now I'm invited to a lottery where I have no idea if I can share expenses with friends
    > or have to go alone. I wonder how many reserved spots they have for the hotel keepers in the
    > Chamber of Commerce this year?
    >
    > It's a business and I'm being processed. Who needs it?
    >

    Lighten up. I did the Death Ride from 1997-2000, 4 years, completing it all but the first year. I
    didn't do it in 2001 because I was too worn out from the Davis 1200K. And I didn't do it in 2002
    because I didn't get selected in the lottery. And I haven't been selected so far this year either.

    But I don't harbor ill feelings about it. I consider it a great ride and, if they can get in, would
    recommend it to anyone.

    Besides, its on public roads that you can ride any day of the week. That is exactly what I did last
    August. My wife provided support at all the usual spots. Surprisingly I enjoyed that as much as the
    Death Ride event.

    Tom
     
  7. I've never ridden the Death Ride or even tried to, so please excuse me if I'm butting in... but if
    it is so popular, why can't it be offered twice (or three or four times) a year to accommodate
    everybody? Why is there a cap on enrollment? It can't be so difficult to find staff to run it,
    particularly if volunteers were offered a priority place for the next year.

    Mike Tordoff Philadelphia
     
  8. Mike: The DeathRide requires closure of a couple of major California State highways, which is
    something very, very difficult to do. It's amazing they get away with it even once a year! So that's
    one aspect. Another would be burn-out. Yes, you can bring in a new stream of volunteers, but the top
    people who organize it can't be just anybody.

    Why the cap on enrollment? These are very narrow, very twisty roads, with very dangerous descents.
    They already have problems with cyclists running into each other at times. Adding more cyclists to
    the roads would make things more dangerous, and you'd also have problems at feed stations. Remember,
    this is in a remote area, it's not in a city where you'd have schools and such you could locate feed
    & water stations. Just about anything you do requires minimal disruption to the environment.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReaction.com

    "Michael Tordoff" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I've never ridden the Death Ride or even tried to, so please excuse me if I'm butting in... but if
    > it is so popular, why can't it be offered twice
    (or
    > three or four times) a year to accommodate everybody? Why is there a cap
    on
    > enrollment? It can't be so difficult to find staff to run it,
    particularly
    > if volunteers were offered a priority place for the next year.
    >
    > Mike Tordoff Philadelphia
     
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