Diet fads, research, industry profits

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Chopper, Nov 7, 2003.

  1. Chopper

    Chopper Guest

    There seems to be yet another revision in what's supposed to be good nutrition. During the '80s and
    '90s the accepted line was that fat is bad, non-sugar carbohydrates are good. That didn't make meat
    producers happy.

    Now it seems to be shifting to fat is ok, carbohydrates are bad.

    The latter view has some prominent research behind it, and apparently it's having a negative effect
    on the corporate profits of some carbo food producers.

    How much of this nutrition stuff is real, and how much is brought on by paid-for agenda "research"?

    Any opinions?

    Thanks
     
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  2. Tcomeau

    Tcomeau Guest

    "Chopper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > There seems to be yet another revision in what's supposed to be good nutrition. During the '80s
    > and '90s the accepted line was that fat is bad, non-sugar carbohydrates are good. That didn't make
    > meat producers happy.
    >
    > Now it seems to be shifting to fat is ok, carbohydrates are bad.
    >
    > The latter view has some prominent research behind it, and apparently it's having a negative
    > effect on the corporate profits of some carbo food producers.
    >
    > How much of this nutrition stuff is real, and how much is brought on by paid-for agenda
    > "research"?
    >
    > Any opinions?
    >
    > Thanks

    In the 70's, during the severe recession, the US govt cut back its support of scientific research.
    Industry stepped in. Today 70% of all research in the US is funded by industry.

    These are corporate sponsors listed on the American Diabetes Association website. I wonder how this
    might impact the research programs that they fund and the positions they take regarding the cause of
    diabetes and other nutritional matters?

    *********************************************************
    The highest level of recognition in the Corporate Recognition Program is called the Banting Circle
    Elite. The designation is named for Frederick Banting, the physician who co-discovered insulin. The
    annual total support for companies reaching this elite level is $750,000. The second level, Banting
    Circle, the third level, Platinum and the fourth level Diamond, each support the Associati $100,000,
    annually. Other sponsor levels include Gold ($50,000), Silver ($25,000) and Bronze ($15,000).

    The Banting Circle Elite Abbott Laboratories Aventis Pharmaceuticals BD Consumer Healthcare
    Bristol-Myers Squibb Company Eli Lilly and Company GlaxoSmithKline Lifescan, Inc., a Johnson &
    Johnson company Medtronic MiniMed Merck & Co., Inc. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation Novo
    Nordisk Pharmaceuticals Pfizer Inc Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America, Inc.

    Banting Circle Abbott Laboratories, Inc., MediSense Products Bayer Corporation Kraft Foods Roche
    Diagnostics Corporation

    Platinum Abbott Laboratories, Ross Product Division (Glucerna) AstraZeneca Dermik Laboratories, Inc.
    J.M. Smucker Company Merisant U.S., Inc. (Equal Sweetener) Olivio Premium Products Tenet Healthcare
    Foundation TheraSense, Inc. Wyeth Pharmaceuticals

    Diamond Archway Cookies, LLC Coolbrands International, Inc. (Eskimo Pie)
    CVS/pharmacy Ebony Magazine Equidyne Systems, Inc. General Mills, Inc. (Fiber One) Good Neighbor
    Pharmacy Health Care Products Health Magazine Hermundslie Foundation KOS Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
    MBNA Murray Sugar Free Cookies Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc. Orhto-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Inc.
    People Weekly Magazine Rite Aid Pharmacy Roche Pharmaceuticals Roundy's Inc. Schering Plough
    Healthcare Products, Inc. Specialty Brands of America (Cary's Sugar Free Cookies) The Procter &
    Gamble Company Voortman Cookies Limited Yahoo!
    ************************************************

    Corporate sponsors of the American Heart Association.

    ********************************************************PARTNERS Partners recognizes corporations
    and foundations for lifetime giving of $1,000,000 and above Archer Daniels Midland Company –
    Illinois AstraZeneca LP – Pennsylvania Aventis Pharmaceuticals – Pennsylvania Averitt
    Express Associate Charities – Tennessee Bayer Corporation – New Jersey Bristol-Myers
    Squibb Company – New Jersey The Henrietta B. and Frederick H. Bugher Foundation – New
    York Citi – Delaware GlaxoSmithKline – Pennsylvania Guidant Corporation – Indiana
    Guidant Foundation – Indiana Harriet and Robert Heilbrunn – New York The J. Willard and
    Alice S. Marriott Foundation – District of Columbia Carlos and Marguerite Mason Trust –
    Georgia Medicine Shoppe International, Inc. – Missouri Mercedes-Benz, USA, LLC – New
    Jersey Merck & Co., Inc. – Pennsylvania Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp. – New Jersey
    Omron Healthcare, Inc. – Illinois Pfizer, Inc. – New York Procter & Gamble Company
    – Ohio Random House, Inc. – New York Sanofi-Synthelabo – New York Schering-Plough
    Corporation – New Jersey Subway – Connecticut Takeda Pharmaceuticals – Illinois
    United Way of Southeastern PA – Pennsylvania Walgreen Co. – Illinois The Harry and
    Jeanette Weinberg Foundation – Hawaii Wyeth-Ayerst Pharmaceuticals – Pennsylvania
    *******************************************

    Corporate sponsors of the American Dietetic Association Foundation.

    *********************************

    December 2002

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    SPECIAL THANKS TO ADA FOUNDATION FNCE EVENT SPONSORS You can read all about the Foundation events
    and fundraising activities at this year’s conference in Philadelphia in the attached cover
    letter. The ADA Foundation would like to extend a special thank you to those sponsors who made the
    events possible.

    Healthy Weight for Kid’s Symposia HealtheTech Mead Johnson Nutritionals National Dairy Council
    The Peanut Institute

    Art of Giving Gala ConAgra Foods Food Marketing Institute Hormel HealthLabs Kraft Foods McNeill
    Nutritionals National Cattleman’s Beef Association Ross Products Division, Abbott Laboratories
    Congratulations to ADA Foundation Corporate Award Recipient, Mead Johnson Nutritionals

    The Philadelphia Challenge 5K Run and Fitness Walk Baxter -- PULSE Hormel Health Labs
    ***************************************************
     
  3. Nicholas

    Nicholas Guest

    "Chopper" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]...
    > There seems to be yet another revision in what's supposed to be good nutrition. During the '80s
    > and '90s the accepted line was that fat is bad, non-sugar carbohydrates are good. That didn't make
    > meat producers happy.
    >
    > Now it seems to be shifting to fat is ok, carbohydrates are bad.
    >
    > The latter view has some prominent research behind it, and apparently it's having a negative
    > effect on the corporate profits of some carbo food producers.
    >
    > How much of this nutrition stuff is real, and how much is brought on by paid-for agenda
    > "research"?
    >
    > Any opinions?
    >
    > Thanks

    Both are ridicolous extremism without any kind of proofs Almost anything promoted by carbo haters
    is false; and there's a good analysis showing how many of the theories of each diet endep up to be
    true or false Carbohydrates are not bad Fats are not bas Is so simple Unrefined carbohydrates are
    healthy foods that shouldn't be lacking in an healthy diet These are expecially fruits, berries and
    vegatables Essential fatty acids are necessary but needed in a small amount Ketosis can't last to
    long, even Atkins followers aknowledge that long term ketosis is dangerous, so from this point of
    view you can't live just relying on ketones and some carbohydrates is therefore necessary for long
    term health You can't live without essential fatty acids, yet even lettuce is 10% fat and not
    getting enough essential fatty acids is impossible, while the problems is getting to much linoleic
    acids and too few alpha-linolenic acid Linoleic acid need is 4g-6g, alpha-linolenic acids need is
    2g Any diet that contain 6% calories as fat provide enough essential fatty acids More essential
    fatty acids can cause serious cellular damage, while more monounsaturated fat is totally useless
    and devoid of more important nutrients So, saturated fats are useless and bad as well as trans fats
    and refined carbohydrates are useless and bad But fat per se is just not bad as well as
    carbohydrates per se are anything but bad It is mostly a matter of quality, but I also feel that
    quantity is important too In a detailed reviews on each diet (low fat, high fat, moderate fats)
    there the nutrients analysis of all the diet and higher fat diet end up to be always lacking in
    vitamins and minerals If you start from a SAD diet, then substituting refined carbohydrates with
    monounsaturated fats is an improvement But eventually substituting monounsaturated fats with
    fruits, legumes and vegetables is a further improvement That's because our fat need (6-8 grams) is
    much lower than vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals needs So, as long as your fat intake is
    adequate and of good quality and your unrefined carbohydrates (legumes, vegetable, fruits,
    berries...) is high you get enough fat and all the needed vitamins, minerals and especially
    phytochemicals and fibers If you raise you fat intake you don't add nothing needed by your body in
    your diet (as fat need is very little) but inturn you lower the consumption of fruits, legumes,
    vegetables, berries and so on lowering also vitamins, minerals, and phytochemical intake The RDA
    bood on lipid agree that as long as a varied diet contain 6% of all calories as fat, fat soluble
    absorption and gall bladder function is not compromised and your essential fatty acids intake is
    adequate We can double this amount as a safety margin From this point (12-13% as fat) it's just our
    own choice if we want to increase fat intake Yet, we should remember that the more we raise fat
    intake, the more we get nutrients that we don't need missing nutrients and phytochemicals that we
    do need Both diet are effective for weight loss

    So, don't buy the useless take home message that fats are bads or carbohydrates are bad All the
    message that are so extreme are also false and misleading Anyway some sort of fats and carbohydrates
    are actually bad: saturated, trans and refined

    Niky
     
  4. Jaym1212

    Jaym1212 Guest

    > Yet, we should remember that the more we raise fat intake, the more we get nutrients that we don't
    > need missing nutrients and phytochemicals that we do need.

    I agree.

    > Anyway some sort of fats and carbohydrates are actually bad: saturated, trans and refined.

    What is your opinion of coconut oil?
     
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