Dutch cycling song

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Simon Mason, Sep 15, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    Every month I put on my website an obscure Dutch song from my extensive collection(usually with
    English lyrics, but in Dutch this time) . This month's offering is cycling related as the first line
    of the song is:

    "Hoe sterk is de eenzame fietser" ("How tough is the lone cyclist") except the singer has a small
    child with him on the album sleeve.

    http://www.simonmason.karoo.net/zdutch.htm
    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
    Tags:


  2. On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 17:54:12 +0100, Simon Mason wrote:
    > Every month I put on my website an obscure Dutch song [...] "Hoe sterk is de eenzame fietser"

    Obscure?! A classic! :)
     
  3. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Ewoud Dronkert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 17:54:12 +0100, Simon Mason wrote:
    > > Every month I put on my website an obscure Dutch song [...] "Hoe sterk is de eenzame fietser"
    >
    > Obscure?! A classic! :)

    Obscure to UK readers Ewoud! If I'd wanted to be obscure to Dutch readers, I would put Bo singing
    "In Your Life"/Slow Motion Mind" when he sang in English in "The Tower" in 1968 ;-)

    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  4. Martin

    Martin Guest

    "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Every month I put on my website an obscure Dutch song from my extensive collection(usually with
    > English lyrics, but in Dutch this time) . This month's offering is cycling related as the first
    > line of the song is:
    >
    > "Hoe sterk is de eenzame fietser"
    is that not what they put on cans of Grosch? OT anyone know the meaning (apart from its literal
    translation, which is "not for the pussycat, but for the cat") of "Niet voor de poos, maar voor de
    kater"? (from a Dutch postcard)
     
  5. On 16 Sep 2003 14:19:07 -0700, martin wrote:
    > OT anyone know the meaning (apart from its literal translation, which is "not for the pussycat,
    > but for the cat") of "Niet voor de [poes], maar voor de kater"? (from a Dutch postcard)

    Not for pussies, but for tomcats. ("Niet voor de poes" means: "it's quite something", and here the
    wordplay is extended to a male/female thing).
     
  6. martin wrote:

    >> "Hoe sterk is de eenzame fietser"
    >is that not what they put on cans of Gro(l)sch?

    AFAIK it's always been "vakmanschap is meesterschap" (loosely translated: " mastery through
    craftmanship"). But then I only drink Guinness, so what do I know?

    I'm allmost sure there is actually a bicycle-themed beer, but for the life of me, I can't remember
    where it's made, or what it's called.

    Mark van Gorkom.
     
  7. On Wed, 17 Sep 2003 18:15:02 GMT, Mark van Gorkom wrote:
    > I'm allmost sure there is actually a bicycle-themed beer, but for the life of me, I can't remember
    > where it's made, or what it's called.

    Don't know it. But if you're ever in Gent, be sure to visit "Het Velootje", an extremely peculiar
    little café in a side alley somewhere. All the abdij beer you'll ever want, and tens of (very) old
    bicycles up on the walls and the ceiling.
     
  8. Martin

    Martin Guest

    Ewoud Dronkert <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 16 Sep 2003 14:19:07 -0700, martin wrote:
    > > OT anyone know the meaning (apart from its literal translation, which is "not for the pussycat,
    > > but for the cat") of "Niet voor de [poes], maar voor de kater"? (from a Dutch postcard)
    >
    > Not for pussies, but for tomcats. ("Niet voor de poes" means: "it's quite something", and here the
    > wordplay is extended to a male/female thing).

    Thanks, that's been bothering me since 1989 (still don't understand the photo on the card though of
    a man carrying two beers past a window with a cat looking out of it).
     
  9. martin wrote:
    >
    > Ewoud Dronkert <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > On 16 Sep 2003 14:19:07 -0700, martin wrote:
    > > > OT anyone know the meaning (apart from its literal translation, which is "not for the
    > > > pussycat, but for the cat") of "Niet voor de [poes], maar voor de kater"? (from a Dutch
    > > > postcard)
    > >
    > > Not for pussies, but for tomcats. ("Niet voor de poes" means: "it's quite something", and here
    > > the wordplay is extended to a male/female thing).
    >
    > Thanks, that's been bothering me since 1989 (still don't understand the photo on the card though
    > of a man carrying two beers past a window with a cat looking out of it).

    It's a pun: Kater also means hangover
    --
    Marten
     
  10. On Wed, 17 Sep 2003 23:27:55 +0200, M-Gineering wrote:
    > It's a pun: Kater also means hangover

    It does, but do you really think it's meant that way? Surely not if the card was from the
    brewery itself..?! More like: a heavy beer, strong, not for pussies, only for the experienced
    (male) beer drinker.

    Anyway. I'll stop the stupid late night bar talk now.
     
  11. Martin

    Martin Guest

    Ewoud Dronkert <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Wed, 17 Sep 2003 18:15:02 GMT, Mark van Gorkom wrote:
    > > I'm allmost sure there is actually a bicycle-themed beer, but for the life of me, I can't
    > > remember where it's made, or what it's called.
    >
    > Don't know it. But if you're ever in Gent, be sure to visit "Het Velootje", an extremely peculiar
    > little café in a side alley somewhere. All the abdij beer you'll ever want, and tens of (very) old
    > bicycles up on the walls and the ceiling.

    Last time I was in Ghent we went to the Belgian equivalent of BHS, the top floor cafe sold mussels,
    chips and draught beer and nothing else (slight exaggeration). Belgian shoppers have got their
    priorities spot on!
     
  12. Martin

    Martin Guest

    Ewoud Dronkert <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Wed, 17 Sep 2003 23:27:55 +0200, M-Gineering wrote:
    > > It's a pun: Kater also means hangover
    >
    > It does, but do you really think it's meant that way? Surely not if the card was from the brewery
    > itself..?! More like: a heavy beer, strong, not for pussies, only for the experienced (male) beer
    > drinker.
    >
    Hardly, it was one of those 25cl glasses of Heineken /whatever with the froth scooped off by a
    letter opener.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...